Making Effective Slides

  • 12,705 views
Uploaded on

Presentation about slide design, given at ANU July 2014

Presentation about slide design, given at ANU July 2014

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
12,705
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
23

Actions

Shares
Downloads
498
Comments
10
Likes
278

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. “IMPRESSIVE MEYERS, BUT LET’S STICK TO YOUR QUANTITATIVE PROJECTIONS” WELCOME TO Designing Effective Presentations
  • 2. HELLO my name is
  • 3. HELLO my name is I AM A
  • 4. TODAY I WILL BE TALKING ABOUT What is Effective Slide Design? Using Type, Images and Color Some Information Design Basics
  • 5. Slides are not a document
  • 6. The audience will either listen or read (AND YOU READ THIS FASTER THAN I CAN SAY IT)
  • 7. Less stuff on slide = Less turning your back
  • 8. > 75 WORDS = DOCUMENT 50 WORDS = TELEPROMPTER VISUAL AID = PRESENTATION SOURCE: NANCY DUARTE IN SLIDEOLOGY DRAWING ON SETH GODWIN
  • 9. Less content shows confidence in your content
  • 10. Text heavy slides are boring (AND MAKE YOUR CONTENT LOOK BORING)
  • 11. (DON’T MAKE A ‘SLIDEUMENT’*) Handouts are an alternative SOURCE: NANCY DUARTE IN SLIDEOLOGY DRAWING ON GARR RENYOLDS
  • 12. TELEPROMPTER VISUAL AID SOURCE: NANCY DUARTE IN SLIDEOLOGY DRAWING ON SETH GODWIN
  • 13. ACADEMIC CONFERENCE COMMERCIAL PITCH 3MT
  • 14. ‘Simple’ is not always so simple Making effective slides will take longer than you think (36–90 HOURS FOR A ONE HOUR PRESENTATION WITH 30 SLIDES) SOURCE: NANCY DUARTE IN SLIDEOLOGY
  • 15. THE KEY TO KEEPING SLIDES SIMPLE Figure/Ground
  • 16. Jane Austen was an English novel- ist whose works of romantic fiction, set among the landed gentry, earned her a place as one of the most widely read writers in English literature. GROUND FIGURE
  • 17. Signal to Noise Ratio
  • 18. Maximize Signal Minimize Noise
  • 19. Avoid complicated shapes behind text
  • 20. Avoid strong colors in the background Unless your type contrasts
  • 21. Avoid bright colors on white (ESPECIALLY IF YOUR TYPE IS SMALL AND/OR THERE IS A LOT OF IT)
  • 22. Use less contrasty patterns like this one
  • 23. or use sizeWHICH CAN (SORT OF, MOST OF THE TIME) OVERCOME A CONTRASTY BACKGROUND
  • 24. Line stuff up and don’t mix alignments
  • 25. Avoid ‘panel-itis’
  • 26. Don’t ‘sprinkle’
  • 27. CREATE FOCUS
  • 28. Hierarchy
  • 29. Hierarchy helps the audience read in the right order So they will understand your main point THIS SLIDE IS FOR THE FOUCAULT THEORISTS
  • 30. or making things bigger Making things brighter Create hierarchy by placing stuff at the top of the page or…
  • 31. Negative space does not need to be filled
  • 32. It creates visual ‘breathing space’
  • 33. WORKING WITH type/image/color
  • 34. Images have ‘negative space’ too
  • 35. Serif OR Sans Serif (and typefaces who can’t decide)
  • 36. typefacescommunicate
  • 37. People disagree least with: Baskerville SOURCE: ERROL MORRIS, NEW YORK TIMES 2012
  • 38. People disagree the most with: Comic Sans SOURCE: ERROL MORRIS, NEW YORK TIMES 2012
  • 39. Contrast between thick and thin strokes is hard to read
  • 40. Minimal contrast is easier to read
  • 41. Gill Sans Ultra Bold Comic Sans Optima Papyrus Futura BrushScript Times New Roman
  • 42. Do not compress or extend type (YES, EVEN TO FIT STUFF ON THE SLIDE!)
  • 43. Use weight for emphasis rather than changing the typeface
  • 44. Don’t use more than three typeface changes on one single SLIDE
  • 45. Becarefulwithjustifiedtype. Especially when in a box
  • 46. Animations can be distracting (USE THEM SPARINGLY)
  • 47. Transition noises can be cheesy (THEY CHEAPEN THE TONE)
  • 48. Avoid clip art and cheap looking cartoons
  • 49. use high quality images
  • 50. Don’t distort images
  • 51. Size images so they can be aligned
  • 52. This is not ‘more interesting’ it’s just messy
  • 53. Avoid Visual Clichés
  • 54. SOURCE: NANCY DUARTE IN SLIDEOLOGY
  • 55. COLOR HAS CULTURAL AND PERSONAL MEANING Red = Death? Life + Creativity? Happiness? Danger? (BUT IT IS NOT THAT SIMPLE, CONTEXT IS IMPORTANT)
  • 56. THERE ARE ONLY 5 WAYS TO ORGANIZE INFORMATION LATCH
  • 57. LOCATION ALPHABETICAL TIME CATEGORY HIERARCHY
  • 58. Arrange data by the ‘story’ you want to tell: Location / data flow about distance/geography
  • 59. Arrange data by the ‘story’ you want to tell: Location / data flow about distance/geography Alphabetical / good for non-linear/‘miscellaneous’ information
  • 60. Arrange data by the ‘story’ you want to tell: Location / data flow about distance/geography Alphabetical / good for non-linear/‘miscellaneous’ information Time / sequence/change over time
  • 61. Arrange data by the ‘story’ you want to tell: Location / data flow about distance/geography Alphabetical / good for non-linear/‘miscellaneous’ information Time / sequence/change over time Category / arrange by similarity or relatedness
  • 62. Arrange data by the ‘story’ you want to tell: Location / data flow about distance/geography Alphabetical / good for non-linear/‘miscellaneous’ information Time / sequence/change over time Category / arrange by similarity or relatedness Hierarchy / common measure (highest to lowest, best to worst)
  • 63. NANCY DUARTE’S RULES ABOUT SHOWING DATA Tell the Truth SOURCE: NANCY DUARTE IN SLIDEOLOGY
  • 64. NANCY DUARTE’S RULES ABOUT SHOWING DATA Tell the Truth Get to the Point SOURCE: NANCY DUARTE IN SLIDEOLOGY
  • 65. NANCY DUARTE’S RULES ABOUT SHOWING DATA Tell the Truth Get to the Point Pick the right tool for the job SOURCE: NANCY DUARTE IN SLIDEOLOGY
  • 66. NANCY DUARTE’S RULES ABOUT SHOWING DATA Tell the Truth Get to the Point Pick the right tool for the job Highlight what’s important SOURCE: NANCY DUARTE IN SLIDEOLOGY
  • 67. NANCY DUARTE’S RULES ABOUT SHOWING DATA Tell the Truth Get to the Point Pick the right tool for the job Highlight what’s important Keep it simple SOURCE: NANCY DUARTE IN SLIDEOLOGY
  • 68. Pick the Right Tool for the Job Bar Charts / compare items
  • 69. Pick the Right Tool for the Job Bar Charts / compare items Line Graphs / show trends over time
  • 70. Pick the Right Tool for the Job Bar Charts / compare items Line Graphs / show trends over time Pie Charts / emphasize proportions
  • 71. Pick the Right Tool for the Job Bar Charts / compare items Line Graphs / show trends over time Pie Charts / emphasize proportions Flowcharts / show process and connectedness
  • 72. Scale 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Skill Development 86% 77% 90% 96% 92% 89% 92% Goals and Expectations 75% 80% 83% 88% 92% 87% 88% Examination 74% 62% 72% 77% 79% 80% 78% Supervision 64% 65% 70% 80% 74% 72% 75% Infrastructure 52% 44% 60% 68% 67% 65% 74% Intellectual Climate 45% 34% 49% 54% 56% 55% 59% Overall Satisfaction 68% 69% 73% 87% 85% 78% 75%
  • 73.  
  • 74. Highlight what’s important
  • 75. 100 95 90 85 80 75 70 65 60 55 50 45 40 35 30 % 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 SKILL DEVELOPMENT GOALS AND EXPECTATIONS EXAMINATION SUPERVISION INFRASTRUCTURE INTELLECTUAL CLIMATE OVERALL SATISFACTION
  • 76. Remember: Signal to Noise
  • 77. Nancy Duarte’s book: Slideology slideology.com Really Bad Powerpoint by Seth Godin: sethgodin.com/freeprize/reallybad-1.pdf presentationzen.com Typeface Research: opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/ 2012/08/08/hear-all-ye-people-hearken-o-earth/
  • 78. Any Questions?