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  • 1. ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT MKT 302 FACULTY GUIDE ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN LIBERAL ARTS CENTER FOR ADULT AND PROFESSIONAL STUDIES CENTENARY COLLEGE COURSE DESCRIPTIONThis course provides an in-depth examination of advertising strategies and tactics. Study focuseson the key managerial implications and issues involved in selecting strategies. This course isintended to provide the practical knowledge needed in advertising management, as well as thetheories behind the practices. Advertising Management provides understanding of these issuesfacing managers today and builds a foundation for making these decisions.
  • 2. © June 2005
  • 3. TABLE OF CONTENTSPROGRAM OVERVIEW ...............................................................................................................1STUDY GROUP GUIDELINES.....................................................................................................2EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY AND PRACTICE .....................................................................3INTRODUCTION Introductory Notes to Instructors .........................................................................................4 Grading Guidelines ..............................................................................................................6 Undergraduate Letter Grade Equivalencies .........................................................................9 Topics ................................................................................................................................10 Course Objectives ..............................................................................................................11 Course Assessment Methods .............................................................................................11 Course Materials ................................................................................................................12CLASS ONE..................................................................................................................................13 Objectives ..........................................................................................................................13 Assignments.......................................................................................................................14 Activities ............................................................................................................................15CLASS TWO .................................................................................................................................19 Objectives ..........................................................................................................................19 Assignments.......................................................................................................................20 Activities ............................................................................................................................21CLASS THREE .............................................................................................................................24 Objectives ..........................................................................................................................24 Assignments.......................................................................................................................25 Activities ............................................................................................................................26CLASS FOUR ...............................................................................................................................29 Objectives ..........................................................................................................................29 Assignments.......................................................................................................................30 Activities ............................................................................................................................31CLASS FIVE .................................................................................................................................34 Objectives ..........................................................................................................................34 Assignments.......................................................................................................................35 Activities ............................................................................................................................36
  • 4. TABLE OF CONTENTSSTUDY GROUP ASSESSMENT PROFILE................................................................................38STUDY GROUP EVALUATION FORM ....................................................................................42CHARACTERISTICS OF HIGHLY EFFECTIVE TEAMS ........................................................43TEAM MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES .....................................................................................44CREATING AN OPENNESS FOR COMMUNICATION...........................................................45
  • 5. PROGRAM OVERVIEWCentenary’s Center Adult and Professional Studies (CAPS) is designed to make the world ofhigher education accessible to a group of individuals who otherwise might not have anopportunity to earn a college degree. It is designed to make efficient use of the workingprofessional’s time, with the courses being scheduled at times and places convenient to workingadults, and a majority of the instruction occurring through guided learning assignments andactivities, both individual and group. The curriculum is structured and sequential in nature, withspecific goals, learning activities, and learning outcomes explicit in every course and in everydegree program. The students in this division enter as cohorts and are accepted for the entireprogram rather than individual courses. The courses themselves offer an appropriate blend oftheory and practice, liberal arts, and career activities.Specifically, the Associate of Arts (AA) in Liberal Arts (with Business Preparation) is a lower-level undergraduate degree program designed for the working adult. The curriculum focuses onskills development in the areas of communication, mathematics, economics, critical analysis, andbasic management skills.PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES1. To provide the adult student who is presently in the workplace with the opportunity to enhance his/her career through the acquisition of relevant skills and the earning of an associate degree.2. To provide the adult student with the necessary components of Centenary’s general education requirements, as well as required credits to qualify for the College’s Associate of Arts degree.3. To provide the adult student with the educational skills and level necessary for continuation in a baccalaureate degree program.4. To incorporate the goals and objectives of the College’s core curriculum.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—1
  • 6. STUDY GROUP GUIDELINESAll undergraduate students within the Centenary Adult and Professional Studies (CAPS)program are required to meet with study groups for the duration of the program. Study groupswork together on guided learning assignments and activities and support one another in theprocess. The study group activities ordinarily require meeting times of at least four hoursweekly. Students will schedule these sessions at a time, method, and location that is mutuallyconvenient and conducive to learning activities. Study groups are expected to use email, chatsessions, teleconferences, and face-to-face meetings each week to complete guided learningassignments and activities. Each student is expected to contribute to the completion of all studygroup assignments and activities.Study groups as a tool are enthusiastically supported by CAPS. Research indicates that studygroups are extremely beneficial in helping students achieve learning outcomes. When studentsaccept that they can learn from one another, a system of trust and support emerges and thelearning process becomes interactive. Study group students meet outside of the required classtime to discuss and prepare assignments and to share learning resources. Each course generallyrequires a group project in the form of a written and/or oral report, usually presented to the classfor discussion and critique. Grades are awarded reflecting the group’s ability to integrate eachmember’s contributions.It is the policy of the Division of Adult and Professional Studies administrative staff not tointerfere with the make-up or operation of any study group. Working together as an effectiveunit is one of the goals of the program design.STUDY GROUP PROTOCOL1. Members develop perspectives and goals for the group as a whole.2. Members develop effective work plans, meeting methods and schedules, assigned roles, and standards of performance during the first week of class. These become the foundation for accomplishing the course objectives and goals.3. Members select a representative to act as liaison between the group and the instructor.4. Members effectively manage conflict within the group and resolve problems.5. Members share the workload equally.6. Members build consensus and share in decision making.7. Tasks are completed on time and meet established requirements.8. Products of the group process (oral presentations, papers, etc.) are cohesive and present the image of a unified single project rather than a collection of individual projects.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—2
  • 7. EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY AND PRACTICEThe educational philosophy and practice of Centenary College recognizes the distinctionbetween the younger college student and the student who has assumed the adult responsibilitiesof self-determination, financial independence, and professional development. The focus ofCentenary College studies, therefore, is on two critical learning objectives. The first of these isshared participant responsibility for self-directed learning. Professional and personal growthrequire that individuals develop the skills necessary to manage their own learning. Throughoutall Centenary College programs, participants are expected to seek answers to their questions,identify and develop resources to address their concerns, and take charge of a majority of theirown learning, specifically through guided learning assignments and activities performed outsideof class time. For this reason, the programs are designed to provide the structure and supportnecessary to encourage independence and self-direction.The second objective is development of the interpersonal skills necessary for effectiveparticipation in groups. Traditionally, the role of the student is relatively passive. Theeducational model advocated by Centenary College, thus, demands active participation bystudents in their educational process and places substantial responsibility on the learner. To thisend, study groups are an integral part of the Centenary College educational model. Study groupsfunction as mutual support mechanisms through which students learn more efficient problemsolving from the professional expertise of peers. At Centenary College, students learn from oneanother by participating in the process of inquiry and active involvement in a study group.Rather than deriving from a single source, learning encompasses multiple life experiences.Study groups as a tool are enthusiastically supported by Centenary College students. Surveys ofgraduates indicate that study groups are extremely beneficial in helping students achieve learningoutcomes. When students accept that they can learn from one another, a system of trust andsupport emerges and the learning process becomes interactive. Study groups meet outside of therequired class time to discuss and prepare guided learning assignments and to share learningresources. They communicate regularly via email, web chats, teleconferences, and face-to-facemeetings. Each course generally requires a group project in the form of a written and/or oralreport, usually presented to the class for discussion and critique. Grades are awarded reflectingthe group’s ability to integrate each member’s contributions.Working adults seldom have sufficient time to devote to full-time, formal education. By sharingthe learning and responsibility in a study group, more information can be disseminated in lesstime and talents and experiences can be shared. Thus, more content is covered in CentenaryCollege courses than would be possible through an individual effort. Study group membersmake a commitment to work together and assist each other in meeting course objectives andoutcomes. Through the study group process, learning is enhanced because students have theopportunity to analyze their experiences, and compare and contrast these experiences withtheories presented in the curriculum materials. Therefore, to better serve the needs of workingadult students, the Centenary College program has developed and instituted the study groupconcept.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—3
  • 8. INTRODUCTIONINTRODUCTORY NOTES TO INSTRUCTORS⎭ The ‘arrow symbol’ is used throughout this module to indicate ‘NOTES TO INSTRUCTOR.’ In addition, you will note that the type style is italicized. The Faculty Guide is an exact duplicate of the Student Guide with faculty notes added immediately following the student information. Use the italicized guide type as your guide when determining the material you have that is not in the student guide. When referring to the material during class, you will find it more effective to avoid page numbers and indicate the Class, Assignment number, etc. Due to the accelerated nature of this course, students should be reminded that study groups are a critical component. These groups of four to six students meet once a week outside of class for a four-hour period. From time to time, students may need to meet with you outside of class to receive feedback on their course assignments or to ask for guidance concerning their group process and relationships. One of the biggest problems in academia today is grade inflation. Many students believe if they meet the minimum requirements for a course and attend class, they should receive an A or at least a B. However, As and Bs should be rewards for exceptional and above average work and should be given only if merited. While students in this program are usually well motivated and conscientious, their adult professional status should not automatically guarantee above average grades. Students usually will perform better if they learn early on that the instructor’s expectations are high and will not be compromised. During Class One, students should be given in writing explicit breakdowns and evaluation percentages for all course requirements and assignments. In addition to written and oral requirements, you will want to inform students in writing how tardiness and class participation will be weighted. Suggested evaluation percentages are as follows: Final Exam 25% Comprehensive Group Assignment 25% Written Individual Assignment 25% Participation, including weekly questions 25%ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—4
  • 9. INTRODUCTIONINTRODUCTORY NOTES TO INSTRUCTORS continued⎭ These evaluation criteria correlate to the expected goal and assessment method for the course. You may opt to change the percentage weightings, or to change the grading criteria for your particular class. Since the grading criteria reflect a specified goal and assessment method, they must be replaced with alternative criteria, which also would measure that goal and assessment method. Your selected grading criteria must be provided to the students in writing during Class One. Groups should be informed whether group exercises and cases will be graded individually or as a group. It might be an interesting exercise for Class One to have the class decide how groups should be graded. Students should be completely clear as to the method for grading group work by the end of Class One.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—5
  • 10. INTRODUCTIONGRADING GUIDELINESEach instructor determines the grading and examination policy for his/her classes. This policyincludes how the instructor arrives at the semester grade for each student, the proportion of gradegiven for papers, tests, hourly exams, semester examinations, and/or other requirements of thecourse. The instructor must include his/her grading policy on his/her syllabus or provide aseparate written grading statement to each member of his/her class(es). The followingprocedures are meant to serve as guidelines for the instructor in the determination of his/hergrading policy and the processing of grades:1. Grade distribution in a given course is not expected to adhere rigidly to one of the normal curves of distribution. However, it is expected that in all courses, especially in courses of an introductory nature enrolling a large number of students, there will be an approach to a normal curve.2. The grade in a course should be based on as broad a variety of assignments as possible— quizzes, hour tests, book reports, term papers, short topical reports, laboratory reports—in other words, as broad a spectrum of activities as are in keeping with the nature of the field. Written assignments, which require analysis and organizational ability, should be required in every course.3. The grade of “A” in a course reflects outstanding work and must be reserved for those few students who truly deserve it. NOTE: While a grade of “A+” may be given for individual assignments and/or tests, only the grade of “A” is recognized by the College on an instructor’s final grade roster.4. The grade of “C” in a course reflects average work in both quantity and quality. The instructor, in determining his/her grading standards, should keep this in mind.5. While Centenary College does not endorse one method of grading over another, one contemporary sample for conversion of numerical grades into letter grades is as follows: A 100–93 C 77–73 A- 92–90 C- 72–70 B+ 89–88 D+ 69–68 B 87–83 D 67–63 B- 82–80 D- 62–60 C+ 79–78 F 59 & belowADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—6
  • 11. INTRODUCTIONGRADING GUIDELINES continued6. A grade given in a course is considered to be final and may not be raised by repeating the course at Centenary or elsewhere. However, when a course in which a student has received a grade of “F” is repeated at Centenary, both the original grade of “F” and the grade for the repeated course will appear on the student’s transcript, but the computation of the cumulative average will be based on the grade received for the repeated course. If a student finds it necessary to retake a course for the third time, the first “F” will not be calculated in the cumulative average but the second grade and the third grade will be averaged and all grades received in the course will appear on the transcript. If a student who repeats a course receives a “W,” the original grade of “F” will prevail. If the student retakes the course at another institution, the original grade of “F” remains in the cumulative average. Exceptions to this policy are internships, independent study courses, and practicum courses.7. Students who fail to complete all course requirements on a timely basis due to specific circumstances or events may petition the Program Director in writing for the grade of “I.” An “Incomplete” is not computed in the grade point average. When the course is completed, the cumulative average will be recalculated replacing the “I” with the value for the grade received. A grade of “I” must be completed within three weeks from the final meeting date of the course. If an “I” is not completed within this time frame, a permanent grade of “F” will be recorded for the course and that “F” will be calculated in the grade point average. The student will be required to repeat the course at his or her own expense.8. Students should understand that evaluation in the form of grading is viewed by Centenary College as a contractual relationship between the instructor and the student. Therefore, although students have the right to protest, actual changes in grades are rare and are at the option of the instructor. The Program Director will intervene only in extreme circumstances and, even then, only as an intermediary. If a student believes that there is a concrete reason to protest a grade for a course, the following procedures will be followed: a. The student should contact the Office of Student Services and request a Grade Appeal Form. b. The student should complete the form and return it to the Office of Student Services within 10 days of the receipt of the protested grade. A copy of the grade appeal will be kept on file in the Office of Student Services, and a copy will be sent to the instructor. c. The instructor will respond to the grade appeal through the Office of Student Services, which will notify the student in writing of the outcome of the appeal.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—7
  • 12. INTRODUCTIONGRADING GUIDELINES continued9. Course grades are issued to students by the Registrar’s Office. Instructors may issue course grades to students before the official grade records are released. In light of increasing emphasis on the confidentiality of student records, instructors are urged to take precautions so that the individual student is protected (i.e., his/her grades are not accidentally or otherwise revealed to other students). Faculty are advised not to post final grades or test results on their office doors, as this may breach a student’s right of confidentiality.10. The instructor must give the student an opportunity to discuss course examinations or projects in class or in individual conferences in order to determine the reason for the grade assigned. The same practice applies to course grades. The instructor may return course examinations to students for discussion only under supervision and he/she is to retain such examinations in his/her office files for a minimum of one semester.11. At the end of the course, final grades are reported to the CAPS Registrar’s Office along with the record of each student’s absences in the course.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—8
  • 13. INTRODUCTIONUNDERGRADUATE LETTER GRADE EQUIVALENCIESA= Student illustrates excellent performance. Has unusually sharp insight into material and initiates thoughtful questions. Sees many sides of an issue. Articulates well and writes logically and clearly. Integrates ideas previously learned from this and other disciplines and anticipates next steps in progression of ideas. Example: “A” work is of such a nature that it could be put on reserve for all students to review and emulate. The “A” student is, in fact, an example for others to follow.B= Student grasps subject matter at a level considered to be good to very good. Is an active listener and participant in class discussion. Speaks and writes well. Accomplishes more than the minimum requirements. Work in and out of class is of high quality. Example: “B” work indicates a high quality of performance and is given in recognition for solid work; a “B” should be considered a high grade.C= Student demonstrates a satisfactory comprehension of the subject matter. Accomplishes only the minimum requirements, and displays little or no initiative. Communicates orally and in writing at an acceptable level for a college student. Has a generally acceptable understanding of all basic concepts. Example: “C” work represents average work for the student in the program or class. A student receiving a “C” has met the requirements, including deadlines, of the course.D= Student produces a quality and quantity of work in and out of class that are below average and barely acceptable. Example: “D” work is passing by a slim margin but is unacceptable if repetitive in nature.F= Student produces a quality and quantity of work in and out of class that are unacceptable. Example: “F” work does not qualify the student to gain credit for the course. Course work must be repeated.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—9
  • 14. INTRODUCTIONTOPICS1. What is Advertising Today?2. The Evolution of Advertising3. The Economic, Social, and Regulatory Aspects of Advertising4. The Scope of Advertising: From Local to Global5. Marketing and Consumer Behavior: The Foundations of Advertising6. Market Segmentation and the Marketing Mix: Determinants of Advertising Strategy7. Research: Gathering Information for Advertising Planning8. Marketing and Advertising Planning: Top-Down, Bottom-Up, and IMC9. Planning Media Strategy: Finding Links to the Market10. Relationship Building: Direct Marketing, Personal Selling, and Sales Promotion11. Relationship Building: Public Relations, Sponsorship, and Corporate Advertising12. Creative Strategy and the Creative Process13. Creative Execution: Art and Copy14. Producing Ads for Print, Electronic, and Digital Media15. Using Print Media16. Using Electronic Media: Television and Radio17. Using Digital Interactive Media and Direct Mail18. Using Out-of-Home, Exhibitive, and Supplementary MediaADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—10
  • 15. INTRODUCTIONCOURSE OBJECTIVESUpon completion of this course, students will be able to:1. Examine global issues impacting advertising and the increasingly global nature of advertising campaigns.2. Discuss the role of diverse cultures in selecting and targeting ad campaigns.3. Describe the role of advertising and how an advertising agency functions.COURSE ASSESSMENT METHODSWhile completing Advertising Management, students are expected to demonstrate measurableoutcomes of course objectives by:1. Being able to analyze advertising campaigns and understand their relationship to the marketing strategies behind them.2. Discussing how advertising is developed, tested, and executed.3. Examining ethical issues in advertising and developing their own code of ethics.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—11
  • 16. INTRODUCTIONCOURSE MATERIALSThe following materials are required for Advertising Management: TEXTBOOK: Arens, W. F. (2006). Contemporary advertising (10th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill. ADDITIONAL MATERIALS: It is strongly recommended that you stay current on world business and marketing news by reading a major newspaper or periodical. The instructor will ask for your opinion and analysis of world events. Trade publications such as Marketing News, Ad Week, and Advertising Age are not highly technical and, therefore, make for interesting reading. They will enhance your understanding of marketing. Study Group Assessment Profile Study Group Evaluation FormADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—12
  • 17. CLASS ONEOBJECTIVESUpon completion of this class, students will be able to: 1. Define advertising from a marketing perspective. 2. Distinguish between advertising and other forms of marketing communication. 3. Explain the role of advertising in marketing communication. 4. Discuss milestones in the evolution of advertising. 5. Explain the impact of advertising on society.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—13
  • 18. CLASS ONEASSIGNMENTSThe following assignments are to be completed prior to this class: INDIVIDUAL: 1. Read Chapters 1–4 and Epilogue. 2. Prepare questions 2, 4, 6, 9, and 10 on page 26. 3. Prepare questions 2, 4, 5, and 10 on page 52. 4. Prepare questions 1, 2, 4, and 6–10, page 95. 5. Prepare questions 1, 4, 5, 7, and 8, page 132. STUDY GROUP: 1. Prepare Ad Lab 1-A, page 11. 2. Prepare Ad Lab 2-A, page 50, Internet Exercises. 3. Prepare Ad Lab 3-B, page 76, questions 1–3. 4. Prepare Ad Lab 4-A, page 103, questions 1 and 2.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—14
  • 19. CLASS ONEACTIVITIESONE The instructor will provide an overview of the course and review objectives, assessment methods, and grading criteria. The discussion will include course assignments, their role in meeting objectives, and the expectations of the instructor and the students. Study groups will discuss and select the comprehensive case to be analyzed and presented.⎭ This is the time to distribute the grading criteria for the course and to determine how groups will be graded. Students should be reminded that assignments are due when stated in their handbook. The importance of working in the cohort group should also be stressed. These groups were formed in the introductory class, and should have remained intact unless someone dropped out of the program. You should take some time to verify the status of each group.TWO The instructor will facilitate a class discussion of the dimensions of advertising. As a class, students will contribute their own experiences regarding the impact of these and other concepts on marketing.⎭ Chapter 1 provides a broad overview and can be handled briefly. Aside from the students’ on-the-job experience, it is important here to encourage students that their exposure to advertising will help them provide valuable input to class discussion.THREE The class will discuss assigned questions from page 26.⎭ Discussion questions focus on class objectives and provide a way for students to synthesize these concepts.FOUR The class will discuss Ad Lab 1-A.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—15
  • 20. CLASS ONEACTIVITIES continuedFOUR continued⎭ This exercise could be considered an icebreaker as you get to know the class. As the exercise calls for creativity, you may want to discuss why that is a good exercise in an Advertising Management course. Although this course does not prepare students to be copywriters or art directors, they do need to understand how to assess a creative campaign. It is also good for them to understand how the “creatives” put a bit of themselves into a campaign. The Ad Labs will be featured as group projects throughout the module as they make students consider some critical issues in advertising.FIVE The instructor will discuss Chapter 2.SIX The class will discuss the questions from page 52.SEVEN The class will discuss Ad Lab 2-A.⎭ Everyone should be able to relate to deceptive advertising practices. This lab clarifies the legal issues.EIGHT The instructor will discuss the ethical issue of puffery if time permits.⎭ The book states that puffery is exaggeration and that it is legal. However, it does not state that the legal intention, according to consumer packaged goods lawyers, is that the exaggeration should be obvious, such as “sleeping on a cloud.” The problem seems to be that recently many companies are pushing the limits: “Advil just works better.”ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—16
  • 21. CLASS ONEACTIVITIES continuedEIGHT continued⎭ Of course, there are numerous ethical issues in advertising and promotions. The Ethical Issues segments of the book provide a good way to facilitate class discussion of these issues.NINE The class will present their conclusions from Ad Lab 3-B.⎭ The purpose here is to get students to consider the ubiquitous legal ramifications that advertisers deal with.TEN The instructor will facilitate a brief discussion of Chapter 3.ELEVEN The class will discuss the questions from page 95.TWELVE The groups will discuss Ad Lab 3-B.THIRTEEN The instructor will facilitate a brief discussion of Chapter 4.FOURTEEN The class will discuss the questions from page 132.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—17
  • 22. CLASS ONEACTIVITIES continuedFIFTEEN The class will discuss Ad Lab 4-A.SIXTEEN The class will discuss the group assignment: a thorough analysis of an advertising campaign (to be presented in Class Four). The Epilogue about Visa is an example of what the instructor will require.⎭ Group projects should include in-depth research and analysis of course topics. Sample projects include a comprehensive study of a major advertising campaign to be presented in Class Four. You will want to ensure that the same project is not being selected by more than one group. Written requirements for the projects should be distributed to the students during this class. Your requirements should ensure that students demonstrate course knowledge and provide analysis and opinions based on analysis. Students should be aware of the grading criteria for the projects in advance.SEVENTEEN The class will discuss the individual assignment of the advertising plan (due in Class Four). Appendix B will serve as a guide.⎭ The individual written project should be assigned (due in Class Four). In designing this project, the goal is to assess students’ knowledge and ability to express it succinctly in writing. A suggested assignment is an advertising plan developed by the student. The plan could be on a business the student creates or a real business that does not currently have a sufficient advertising plan such as a family business or other small business. Explain that the purpose of the assignment is for students to demonstrate their ability to apply advertising strategy and programs. Encourage students to choose a business for which they will enjoy creating strategy. Properly documented research should be required.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—18
  • 23. CLASS TWOOBJECTIVESUpon completion of this class, students will be able to: 1. Explain the pros and cons of different methods of pre- and post-testing advertising. 2. Explain top-down and bottom-up planning in advertising. 3. Plan for new competitive threat. 4. Discuss the methods and processes of budgeting in advertising. 5. Explain how a media plan helps accomplish a company’s advertising plan. 6. Explain reach and frequency. 7. Describe and be able to calculate gross impressions, GRPs, and cost per thousand. 8. Explain the different types of advertising schedules.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—19
  • 24. CLASS TWOASSIGNMENTSThe following assignments are to be completed prior to this class: INDIVIDUAL: 1. Read Chapters 7–10. In Chapter 7, focus on the material toward the end of the chapter that deals specifically with advertising research rather than marketing research in general. (As in marketing research, as well as the topics of Chapters 5 and 6, consumer behavior and segmentation were covered in Principles of Marketing so your knowledge of these areas will be assumed.) 2. Prepare question 10 from page 230 for discussion. 3. Prepare questions 5–10, page 264. 4. Prepare questions 1–3, 5, 6, and 8–10 (page 300) for class discussion. 5. Prepare questions 1–3 and 7–10, page 334. 6. Work toward completion of the individual written assignment (due in Class Four). The instructor will set aside time during class to answer questions. STUDY GROUP: 1. Prepare Ad Lab 8-A, questions 1 and 2. 2. Prepare Ethical Issues, questions 1 and 2, pages 240–241. 3. Prepare Ad Lab 8-B, questions 1 and 2. 4. Prepare Ad Lab 9-A, questions 1 and 2. 5. Prepare Ethical Issues, questions 1 and 2, pages 274–275. 6. Prepare Ad Lab 9-B, questions 1 and 2. 7. Prepare Ad Lab 10-A. 8. Work toward completion of group project.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—20
  • 25. CLASS TWOACTIVITIESONE The instructor will facilitate a discussion of advertising research from Chapter 7.⎭ Focus on specific methods of testing advertising and the pros and cons points of each.TWO The instructor will discuss the questions from Chapter 7.THREE The instructor will discuss Chapter 8, IMC, and planning.⎭ After discussing planning activity in advertising, you may want to re-open the topic of the students’ individual assignments: the advertising plan. The class may have synthesized more questions after this week’s reading.FOUR The discussion will focus on the questions for Chapter 8.FIVE The students will present Ad Lab 8-A.⎭ You may wish to cite more examples from Trout and Reis’ books.SIX The groups will present Ethical Issues from pages 240–241.⎭ Ascertain if anyone has experience seeing ads from other countries. Since comparative advertising is illegal in most other countries, it provides an interesting point of comparison.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—21
  • 26. CLASS TWOACTIVITIES continuedSEVEN The groups will present Ad Lab 8-B.⎭ This lab provides a good opportunity to point out that although economic theories predict a relationship between advertising and sales, there is a danger in charging those responsible for advertising with delivering sales. Of course, there are three other “Ps.”EIGHT The instructor will discuss planning of media strategy.⎭ This chapter provides media tactics and terms that are probably unfamiliar to the students, so it may take a bit longer to cover than most. Make sure students understand how to calculate gross impressions, GRPs, BDIs, and CDIs.NINE The instructor will discuss questions from Chapter 9.TEN The students will present Ad Lab 9-A.⎭ New examples of “Off-the-Wall Media” pop up everyday. It might be fun to have students think about where they will find ads next.ELEVEN The groups will present Ethical Issues from pages 274–275.⎭ Agency commissions continue to be a major issue in advertising.TWELVE The groups will present Ad Lab 9-B.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—22
  • 27. CLASS TWOACTIVITIES continuedTHIRTEEN The instructor will outline Chapter 10.⎭ You may wish to focus on direct marketing and sales promotion, as the discussion of personal selling may be rather basic for these adult learners, many of whom are likely to have knowledge of the sales function; however some students may have had limited exposure to professional sales people. You may want to poll the class as to their opinion about sales people. Those exposed to retail sales such as car sales people may have extremely negative views. Help the class to see that this is a profession of problem solving and not pushing whatever can be sold.FOURTEEN The groups will present Ad Lab 10-A.FIFTEEN Time will be provided for questions that students may have as they prepare their individual and their group assignments.⎭ Allot time for class and individual questions. Students should be encouraged to be creative in developing these assignments.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—23
  • 28. CLASS THREEOBJECTIVESUpon completion of this class, students will be able to: 1. Explain public relations. 2. Describe the tools that public relations professionals use. 3. Describe how event sponsorship fits into IMC. 4. Explain the role of corporate identity advertising. 5. Explain the jobs of the creative team and their importance. 6. Describe the role of the creative brief. 7. Discuss the role of artists in the advertising business. 8. Explain the advantages and disadvantages of the different types of television commercials.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—24
  • 29. CLASS THREEASSIGNMENTSThe following assignments are to be completed prior to this class: INDIVIDUAL: 1. Read Chapters 11–13. 2. Prepare discussion questions 1–10 from page 365. 3. Prepare discussion questions 1, 2, and 7–9 from page 403. 4. Prepare discussion questions 1, 3, 7, and 8 from page 437. STUDY GROUP: 1. Prepare to discuss Ethical Issues from pages 340–341 (questions 1 and 2). 2. Prepare to present Ad Lab 11-A. 3. Prepare Ad Lab 11-B. 4. Prepare Ad Lab 12-A. Rather than focusing on a specific question, find some examples of use of color and what tone it sets. 5. Prepare Ethical Issues from pages 390–391. 6. Prepare Ad Lab 12-C. 7. Prepare Ad Lab 13-A. 8. Complete Ad Lab 13-B.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—25
  • 30. CLASS THREEACTIVITIESONE The instructor will facilitate a discussion on relationship building.⎭ You may wish to cut this discussion short as the following review questions do a particularly good job of covering the chapter.TWO The class will discuss the questions from Chapter 11.THREE The class will present Ethical Issues from pages 340–341.FOUR The class will present Ad Lab 11-A.⎭ These questions should stimulate thinking and discussion regarding advocacy advertising. At this point in the course, students should feel entirely comfortable leading presentations. It is up to you and the class to decide whether groups take turns presenting group assignments or all groups pitch in for each assignment.FIVE The groups will present Ad Lab 11-B.⎭ This is a great opportunity to expose students to the insights of advertising pioneer and prolific author on the subject, until his death in 1999, David Ogilvy.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—26
  • 31. CLASS THREEACTIVITIES continuedSIX The instructor will lead a discussion on creating ads and commercials.⎭ You may want to ask students why they are studying the creative side of the advertising business as they, clearly, are not training to be creatives. The answer is in order to understand how the creatives achieve advertising goals through their work and that they, as managers, may stand in judgment of this work. You may decide to require a creative execution as an ungraded part of the advertising plan. This way, students can role-play to understand the creative team’s position better.SEVEN The class will discuss the questions from Chapter 12.EIGHT The students will discuss Ad Lab 12-A.⎭ Remind the students how much a part of a brand color can be, e.g. Coke, Kodak, and Marlboro.NINE The class will present Ethical Issues from pages 390–391.⎭ Does sex sell? What risks are there? It should be interesting to hear the various points of view.TEN Ad Lab 12-C will be presented.⎭ Urge the students to relate these fun activities to the various creative roles.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—27
  • 32. CLASS THREEACTIVITIES continuedELEVEN The instructor will discuss Chapter 13 on creating ads.⎭ You may want to select your own examples of various types of ads and commercials to demonstrate the topics of the chapter.TWELVE The groups will present Ad Lab 13-A.THIRTEEN The discussion will focus on Ad Lab 13-B.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—28
  • 33. CLASS FOUROBJECTIVESUpon completion of this class, students will be able to: 1. Describe the print production process. 2. Explain how radio and television commercials are developed. 3. Explain how to save money in production. 4. Describe the special effects in television. 5. Describe the advantages and disadvantages of magazine and newspaper advertising. 6. Explain how rates are determined for various media. 7. Discuss the various sources of media data. 8. Describe the types of digital media and know the terminology associated with them.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—29
  • 34. CLASS FOURASSIGNMENTSThe following assignments are to be completed prior to this class: INDIVIDUAL: 1. Complete the advertising plan for submission. 2. Read Chapters 14–16. 3. Prepare questions 1, 2, 7, and 8 from page 474 for discussion. STUDY GROUP: 1. Prepare to present the group project. 2. Prepare Ad Lab 14-A. Rather than considering the questions in the book, think about characteristics of type that is appropriate and inappropriate for a resume and explain why. How about a bridal store ad? Hardware store ad? 3. Prepare Ad Lab 14-B. 4. Prepare Ethical Issues, page 469. 5. Prepare Ethical Issues, pages 518–519. 6. Be ready to present Ad Lab 16-A. 7. Prepare Ad Lab 16-C.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—30
  • 35. CLASS FOURACTIVITIESONE The instructor will collect the advertising plans.⎭ Depending on class size, you may want to set aside a few minutes to have each student present a very brief summary of his or her projects. As they have been working on the projects for a while, they may enjoy hearing what other students have been working on.TWO The groups will present their projects.⎭ Time constraints should be enforced to assure that there is time for all students to present as well as cover the rest of the activities.THREE The instructor will present a brief overview of production.FOUR The class will discuss the questions from page 474.FIVE The discussion will focus on Ad Lab 14-A.⎭ Encourage students to consider how type characteristics may not be consciously noticed, but may set a mood in advertising. Students were asked to consider a resume, which should be an example that everyone has been responsible for designing.SIX The class will discuss Ad Lab 14-B.⎭ This lab can be handled quite briefly; however, it should open students’ eyes to the subtle, yet important differences of film versus tape.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—31
  • 36. CLASS FOURACTIVITIES continuedSEVEN There will be a presentation of Ethical Issues from page 469.⎭ This Ethical Issues does should cause students to think about the potential manipulation with special effects in advertising.EIGHT The instructor will present Chapter 15.⎭ The students may be a bit “burnt out” after submitting their individual project and presenting their group project, so it works well that the chapters for Classes Four and Five are extremely practical. You can just use examples to review the terms of the chapters. No review questions or Ad Labs were assigned from this chapter for just this reason.NINE The instructor will facilitate a discussion of Chapter 16 on using electronic media.⎭ Again, this is a practical chapter packed with how information is used with regard to electronic media. Examples help you get right down to business.TEN The instructor will present Ethical Issues from pages 518–519.⎭ Everyone should have an opinion about advertising to this vulnerable target.ELEVEN The class will present Ad Lab 16-A.⎭ Students will better understand how ad rates for television are determined.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—32
  • 37. CLASS FOURACTIVITIES continuedTWELVE There will be a review of Ad Lab 16-C.⎭ This Ad Lab on radio rates is analogous to Ad Lab 15-A.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—33
  • 38. CLASS FIVEOBJECTIVESUpon completion of this class, students will be able to: 1. Discuss the various terms in digital advertising. 2. Explain the types of direct-mail advertising. 3. Describe the pros and cons of out-of-home advertising. 4. Explain the importance of exhibitive media in a company’s promotions mix. 5. Contrast the different types of supplementary media. 6. Explain the issues faced when considering a packaging change.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—34
  • 39. CLASS FIVEASSIGNMENTSThe following assignments are to be completed prior to this class: INDIVIDUAL: 1. Read Chapters 17–18. The focus of Chapter 17 should be the terms on page 573. 2. Solve discussion questions 3–5, 9, and 10 from page 603. 3. Review for the exam (if assigned). STUDY GROUP: 1. Prepare Ethical Issues, questions 1–3, from pages 590–591. 2. Review for the exam (if assigned) and discuss what points you wish to cover again with the instructor before the exam is given. Time will be set aside for this purpose.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—35
  • 40. CLASS FIVEACTIVITIESONE The instructor will facilitate a discussion of digital and direct-mail advertising.⎭ Due to time constraints, focus should be on the terms of the chapter with which students may not be familiar. Some terms, such as “search engine” are commonplace; however, advertising terms such as “meta ad” may be less so.TWO The instructor will review Chapter 18.⎭ Although Chapter 17 covers less glamorous advertising media, plan not to give it short shift, as it is important, especially for small budgets of smaller companies.THREE The instructor will present Ethical Issues from pages 590–591.⎭ This area provides more discussion on how best to protect children. If it is not taught in advertising and considered by practitioners, of course, more legislation will be enacted to consider it for the profession.FOUR The class will review for the exam.⎭ Use whatever format you and/or the class prefer. Let them know how long they have for the review and be sure to stick to it so there will be time for the test.FIVE The study group peer and instructor evaluations will be administered.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—36
  • 41. CLASS FIVEACTIVITIES continuedSIX The exam (if assigned) will be administered.⎭ If you decide to give an in-class exam, be very aware of the time constraints. A suggested format is a short case study of several essay questions that allow students to demonstrate that they have digested and retained the material of the course.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—37
  • 42. STUDY GROUP ASSESSMENT PROFILEA basic yet important step in team building is to assess the strengths of the team. The followingfactors are all essential for an effective team. Take time to review these items, and circle theappropriate number as you rate each item. Taking the assessment serves as an excellent team-building tool for study groups.1. PURPOSE/GOALS Study group members know and understand the purpose and the goals of the study group. All have had a chance to shape the purpose and to identify their own special passion for work to contribute to the overall goals. 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Highly Partially Completely Characteristic Characteristic Uncharacteristic2. OBJECTIVES Study group members are involved in setting, reviewing, and evaluating objectives, both individually and for the entire study group. 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Highly Partially Completely Characteristic Characteristic Uncharacteristic3. TASK DESCRIPTIONS Study group members are clear about everyone’s expected contribution to the work. People have tasks and responsibilities that best fit their expertise, natural talents, and interests. 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Highly Partially Completely Characteristic Characteristic UncharacteristicADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—38
  • 43. STUDY GROUP ASSESSMENT PROFILE4. DECISION MAKING Essential, relevant information is used to make decisions. Viewpoints are discussed in a positive way that encourages everyone to contribute ideas and concerns. 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Highly Partially Completely Characteristic Characteristic Uncharacteristic5. AUTONOMY/INTEGRATION Members are clear about the degree of autonomy they have to complete assignments; study group works well in integrating contributions of all members. 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Highly Partially Completely Characteristic Characteristic Uncharacteristic6. COMMUNICATION Members communicate in advance of major group assignments and projects. Members of the group talk freely with each other, and regularly and openly discuss issues during meetings. 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Highly Partially Completely Characteristic Characteristic Uncharacteristic7. INNOVATION Members are encouraged to use creativity and accept the challenge to experiment in order to develop useful new ideas for solving problems. 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Highly Partially Completely Characteristic Characteristic UncharacteristicADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—39
  • 44. STUDY GROUP ASSESSMENT PROFILE8. CONFLICT Essential differences are openly discussed and worked through for thorough understanding and sound resolutions. 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Highly Partially Completely Characteristic Characteristic Uncharacteristic9. QUALITY The study group commits to high quality standards. Members are motivated to display both individual and team excellent performance to achieve the study group’s goals. 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Highly Partially Completely Characteristic Characteristic Uncharacteristic10. TEAM DEVELOPMENT Regular reviews of the study group’s performance are conducted, based on jointly agreed upon criteria. Study group members receive realistic reviews of strengths and weaknesses, resulting in improvement in each member’s personal effectiveness toward the group’s goals. 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Highly Partially Completely Characteristic Characteristic UncharacteristicADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—40
  • 45. STUDY GROUP ASSESSMENT PROFILE11. COMMITMENT Members exhibit a strong tie to a common goal in the success of the study group. Each study group member makes the highest level of contribution, both in quality of work and relationships. 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Highly Partially Completely Characteristic Characteristic Uncharacteristic12. TEAM SPIRIT Cohesion and study group loyalty lead to mutual assistance and shared resources when needed. People show respect and trust to all study group members. 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Highly Partially Completely Characteristic Characteristic UncharacteristicAdapted from concepts in Spectacular Teamwork (Blake, Moulton and Allen; John Wiley andSons; 1987).ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—41
  • 46. STUDY GROUP EVALUATION FORMNOTE: This form is to be completed by each group member in confidence. The instructorshould also maintain confidentiality.Group Name: ___________________________________ [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] Attended Demonstrated Fulfilled Prepared Overall Names Planning Voluntary Responsibility Materials Evaluation Sessions Cooperation in Class 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Your Name0 = Lowest Evaluation 5 = Highest Evaluation1. List the names of each group participant and your name, as indicated. Be sure to evaluate yourself.2. Scale 0 to 5 — To what extent did each member of the group attend the study group sessions scheduled?3. Scale 0 to 5 — Did each group member prepare materials as assigned?4. Scale 0 to 5 — Did each group member participate in a positive manner with other group members?5. Scale 0 to 5 — Did each group member participate in class with all responsibilities fulfilled?6. Scale 0 to 5 — How would you rate the overall evaluation contribution of each group member?(Completed forms should be collected by the instructor and used in student evaluations.)ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—42
  • 47. CHARACTERISTICS OF HIGHLY EFFECTIVE TEAMS1. There is a clear, shared team vision.2. The team sees itself as fitting into a larger system.3. Work is managed against clear, well-defined goals.4. Priorities are understood, agreed upon, and adhered to.5. Processes are effective and efficient.6. There is a balance of individual autonomy and interdependence.7. People waste little time on rumor and gossip.8. Risk and failure are accepted and learned from.9. Innovation and experimentation are encouraged.10. Members collaborate and spontaneously support each other’s work.11. Decisions are made using the most appropriate style for the issue.12. Problems are solved by the members with a stake in the issue.13. Team is task focused and action oriented.14. Team relationships are based on trust and respect.15. Individual roles and responsibilities are well understood.16. All contributions are recognized and rewarded.17. Team atmosphere is congenial, comfortable, and fun.18. Power is distributed to all team members.19. Conflicts and differences are accepted, valued, and confronted.20. Information about work assignments is shared fully.21. There is confidence in each other’s commitment and ability.22. Team members support each other’s challenge to grow.23. Team members seek timely and accurate feedback about their work.24. People listen carefully to each other and respond appropriately.25. Team leadership keeps the team focused, inspired, and energized.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—43
  • 48. TEAM MANAGEMENT STRATEGIESStage 1. Startup: Directing, Task-Focused Behavior Setting goals Establishing timelines Writing job descriptions Preparing an agenda Training for skills Testing abilities Writing action plansStage 2. Evolving: Coaching, Mentoring Behavior Observing trial activities Reviewing plans Asking questions Listening Encouraging Explaining benefits Solving problems Demonstrating skills Clarifying goalsStage 3. Learning: Encouraging, Cheerleading Behavior Listening to solutions Encouraging problem solving Observing successes Creating rewards Encouraging innovations Encouraging conflicts Promoting achievementsStage 4. Peak Performance: Delegating, Monitoring Behavior Delegating decisions Rewarding successes Encouraging growth Seeing new ideas Tracking progress Developing alliances Facilitating differences Finding new resourcesADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—44
  • 49. CREATING AN OPENNESS FOR COMMUNICATIONIf we want other people to be open and supportive of us and of our ideas, we can take steps tocreate an environment that encourages people to talk honestly. At the same time, by ourlanguage, tone, and body language, we can create a strong atmosphere of defensiveness. SIX BEHAVIORS THAT GENERATE DEFENSIVENESS1. Judging: You’re wrong.2. Superiority: I’m right and you’re not.3. Certainty: My mind’s made up. Don’t confuse me with facts.4. Controlling: Let me tell you how to do your job.5. Manipulation: I’m sure you’ll see it my way.6. Indifference: You’re not important. SIX BEHAVIORS THAT STIMULATE OPENNESS1. Description: I see that the bolt is loose.2. Equality: Why don’t we sit down together?3. Openness: Let’s exchange points of view.4. Problem-orientation: If we shed some light on the issue, we can resolve it.5. Positive Intent: Let’s talk it out.6. Empathy: I’ve had the same problem and it’s tough.ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT FACULTY—45