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Integrative MediaIntegrative Media Production & Publication
Integrative MediaIntegrative Media Production & Publication
Integrative MediaIntegrative Media Production & Publication
Integrative MediaIntegrative Media Production & Publication
Integrative MediaIntegrative Media Production & Publication
Integrative MediaIntegrative Media Production & Publication
Integrative MediaIntegrative Media Production & Publication
Integrative MediaIntegrative Media Production & Publication
Integrative MediaIntegrative Media Production & Publication
Integrative MediaIntegrative Media Production & Publication
Integrative MediaIntegrative Media Production & Publication
Integrative MediaIntegrative Media Production & Publication
Integrative MediaIntegrative Media Production & Publication
Integrative MediaIntegrative Media Production & Publication
Integrative MediaIntegrative Media Production & Publication
Integrative MediaIntegrative Media Production & Publication
Integrative MediaIntegrative Media Production & Publication
Integrative MediaIntegrative Media Production & Publication
Integrative MediaIntegrative Media Production & Publication
Integrative MediaIntegrative Media Production & Publication
Integrative MediaIntegrative Media Production & Publication
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Integrative MediaIntegrative Media Production & Publication

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  • 1. SCCT2013Integrative MediaIntegrative Media Production & Publication 1
  • 2. Topics: 9.1 Production Phases 9.2 Publication structure 9.3 Navigational Aids 9.4 Publication considerations 9.5 Publication Methodshttp://publications.europa.eu/vademecum/vademecum/production1_en.html 2
  • 3. 9.1 Production Phases Pre-production Acceptance Discovery Definition Client & production Assign players to Client & production team meet to the project & team must meet to establish project deliver a high level initiate the project & requirements & plan brief to the team research the overall out the production objectives and goals phasehttp://hivemanagement.com/content1/preproduction.htm 3
  • 4. 9.1 Production Phases Production Structure Design & Build & test Prototype Initial steps are Production team taken by production begins to address the Look & feel are team to define & look & feel, finalized and tested frame the structure production of media to verify goals and of the solution elements and initial objectives codinghttp://hivemanagement.com/content1/preproduction.htm 4
  • 5. 9.1 Production Phases Post-Production Launch Evaluate Maintain Project is Project is delivered after Structure is tested & monitored to final approval & verified for final QA ensure goals & QA objectiveshttp://hivemanagement.com/content1/preproduction.htm 5
  • 6. 9.2 Multi-media Publication Structure An important consideration in multimedia usability is structure. If the user does not understand the structure, there will be confusion and usage of the product will be impaired. Although in practice, publications are not confined to one structure, a general understanding of the types of structures available and their attributes can aid in multimedia design. 6
  • 7. 9.2 Multi-media Publication Structure Linear Structure  The traditional structure, and one that most familiar.  Each piece of the information is to be viewed in a fixed position that is essential to its understanding.  Time-based media such as film, television or radio broadcast are linear in structure.  A linear structure is necessary to tell a story and can be effective when trying to achieve set goals as in educational projects. 7
  • 8. 9.2 Multi-media Publication Structure Hierarchical Structure  Each node of the structure represents an idea and may have subordinate nodes that expand on part of the parent nodes.  This type of structure is particularly useful for reference material where a user may browse the upper nodes in a linear fashion and then easily go deep into areas of interest without too much confusion. 8
  • 9. 9.2 Multi-media Publication Structure Network Structure  The disadvantages  A network structure can be overcome by allows the user to jump to many places the addition of good from different navigational aids. positions within a publication.  While this allows great flexibility it can also be confusing with the user becoming disoriented. 9
  • 10. 9.2 Multi-media Publication Structure Cyclic structure  Cyclic structure can  A cyclic structure is similar also be used in to a linear one in that each education whereby piece of information has a the user needs to set position but is different reach a level of in that a user can begin at information before any position and can qualification. continue through one complete cycle in order to attain the same amount of information.  An example of this might be a public information point in a museum that has a small explanation of each exhibit in a room. 10
  • 11. 9.3 Navigational Aids The usability of a publication depends not only on the structure and links chosen, but also on the users knowledge of the system and the usefulness of the navigation aids. A user will feel lost if he or she has no way of orienting him or herself. Aids such as path lists allow the user to establish where they have come from while a graphical representation of the accessible system can indicate the location overall. Aids such as alphabetical content lists or hierarchical tables of contents can also assist the user. 11
  • 12. 9.4 Publication considerations There are many processes in producing a multi-media publication. The following is a checklist of points which should be considered:  completion of manuscript possible conversion of manuscript if necessary into a different document type  author and date registration  ensure all necessary components are received, i.e. for metadata, keywords, etc.  ensure verification tools are provided or referenced  texts may have to be translated/corrected/checked  compile all graphic designs: labels; covers; sites, web pages, icons, navigational tools, logos, etc. 12
  • 13. 9.4 Publication considerations ensure all cross-links are included and correct, this is especially important in the case of a hybrid publication ensure all hyperlinks are in place and correct (there are tools available for checking the validity of links); technical advice/suitability for conversion draw up any necessary subscription licenses ensure any E-mail ordering facilities or any support services are in place set realistic publication deadlines and schedule follow specified production procedures allow time for hard-copy proof-reading to pick up any errors before publication. 13
  • 14. 9.5 Publication method Multi-media production can be published using the following method:  Website  Hybrids  CD-ROM/DVD 14
  • 15. 9.5 Publication methodWebsite Access control  General  Website structures may involve  Statistics from web servers can the use of access controls if the provide pointers on the use of a information is deemed to be publication and information confidential or valuable. regarding potential changes and  This involves user authentication improvements to the structure. that requires the infrastructure  Creation of a database back-end for administration of user access for storing the media assets can rights. allow ease of updating/archiving Added-value services through binding them into HTML templates.  A website structure can open the possibilities for added-value  The advantages of these web services such as personalisation, publishing databases is not only downloading files and push seen in design, production and tools. updating of the publication. Their assets can also be reused in later  Paid services could take publications. advantage of e-commerce solutions such as licence keys, payment tokens, subscriptions, ordering by e-mail and making credit card payments. 15
  • 16. 9.5 Publication methodHybrids CD-ROM/DVD The use of the hybrid  Multimedia publications structure allows for larger may be distributed offline static objects to be held on CD-ROM and DVD-ROM closer to the user while devices. allowing for the small dynamic content to exist in the web environment. The possibilities are numerous and can use many leading-edge tools such as a Flash generator or DHTML for dynamically updated non-static content presentation. 16
  • 17. 9.5 Publication methodCD facts  The CD was originally designed for  CDs are never made perfectly audio and later the specification and require error correction to was extended to enable storage of reproduce data correctly. computer data and other formats.  CD standards specifications are  A standard CD is capable of known as the coloured book holding approximately 76 minutes specification. or 650 Mb of data.  CDs are 120 mm or 80 mm in  The CD file system is ISO 9660 diameter and 1.2 mm thick with a which has two levels. Level 2 15 mm diameter centre hole. allows 32-character file names which are not usable by MS-DOS systems.  A 40 x CD is capable of maximum data transfer of 2.8 to 6 Mbps. 17
  • 18. 9.5 Publication methodThe following is a brief outline of the CD coloured bookstandards developed by Philips, Sony, Kodak, etc. Type Book Book Description Description CD audio CD digital audio,including: CD Red graphics,CD text, etc. CD-ROM (8 and 12 cm) Yellow CD for data CD-I and Photo CD CD interactive and Green Photo CD (Kodak) CD-WO and CD-RW Orange Recordable CD CD-video/LaserDisc Initial video disc Orange (20 and 30 cm) Multi-session CD and CDs having two or Blue CD extra more sets 18
  • 19. 9.5 Publication methodDVD facts  DVDs are capable of being recorded on both sides and with two layers of The DVD was designed for recording per side. multimedia (video, audio, data).  A standard DVD will hold 4.7 Gb of DVD was originally an abbreviation data per layer and 8.5 Gb per side for digital video disc but is now (17 Gb for two sides and two better known as digital versatile layers). This equates to 133 disc. minutes of video for 4.7 Gb of high quality MPEG-2. According to the standard, DVD players should be able to play CD-  The file system is UDF (universal audio and CD-ROMs. disc format) for all formats although the DVD-ROM standard also DVDs and CDs have the same supports ISO 9660. external physical dimensions.  A PC requires an MPEG-2 decoder DVD standards were set out by the to play DVD-video or MPEG encoded DVD Forum which consists of a data on DVD-ROM. group of 10 companies.  DVD-video is designed to replace DVDs are designed for three VHS. formats: DVD-ROM (for data) , DVD-video and DVD-audio.  A 6 x DVD is capable of maximum data transfer of 66 Mbps. 19
  • 20. 9.5 Publication methodThe DVD book standards (information from Toshiba) Type Book Description DVD-ROM Both ISO 9660 (CD) and UDF A DVD-video B UDF - MPEG-2 video for films DVD-audio UDF - high quality and longer audio than CD C DVD-R D UDF - write once DVD-RAM UDF - rewriteable E 20
  • 21. 9.5 Publication method Items to consider when  user guides printed and/or producing CD-ROM/DVD electronically-printed will also require separate catalogue number, ISBN and covers  Title, subtitle, catalogue No, ISBN;  bar code - this can be printed  search software copyright on CD-ROMs and/or covers  compact disc logo/DVD logo/MPEG logo  cover design and packaging design  corporate author and logo, publisher and/or logo;  cover text  user licenses: to be added (separate catalogue number reference if not  installation instructions included in the CD-ROM);  packaging when more than one component: title, catalogue number, etc. 21

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