Test innovation for everyone

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My slides from Eurostar 2012

My slides from Eurostar 2012

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  • Anyone can be a test innovator – why not you? Here’s a dirty little secret from innovators. There’s no secret to innovation. Innovation is certainly more difficult than tying your shoe, but it’s not a concept exclusive to entrepreneurs, artists, or conference speakers either. The software tester’s nature for system thinking, and for identifying problems and patterns makes them well-suited for innovation, yet few testers take the time to apply their skills and experience to this end. Successful innovation is not purely a matter of skill, intelligence, or luck. Innovation begins with careful identification and analysis of a problem, obstacle, or bottleneck; followed by a solution that not only solves the problem, but frequently solves it in a way that has widespread benefit – or in a way that changes the basic nature of the problem entirely. Alan Page breaks down the cogs and wheels of innovation and shows examples of how some testers are applying game-changing creativity to discover new ways to improve tests, testers, and testing on their organizations. Problems, solutions, tips, tricks, and more are all on the radar for this whirlwind tour of pragmatic test innovation. Best of all, you’ll walk away knowing that anyone, especially you, can be a test innovator.
  • http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/ostrich-pillow
  • All work is problem solving. Creativity is simply another word for the process of solving problems. If you give me a tough problem and I solve it for you, you may tell me “wow you are so creative” but really what I did was solve a set of problems. I may have used some old ideas, or some new ones, but to you it’s all the same since your problem was solved. Obsessing about how innovative you are is a mistake because it distracts from the real goal of solving important problems. The more ambitious the goals of a team, the more problem solving skills they will need to be successful and they better they need to be at identifying the real problems to solve.
  • All work is problem solving. Creativity is simply another word for the process of solving problems. If you give me a tough problem and I solve it for you, you may tell me “wow you are so creative” but really what I did was solve a set of problems. I may have used some old ideas, or some new ones, but to you it’s all the same since your problem was solved. Obsessing about how innovative you are is a mistake because it distracts from the real goal of solving important problems. The more ambitious the goals of a team, the more problem solving skills they will need to be successful and they better they need to be at identifying the real problems to solve.
  • Two kinds of problems: Problemswe know wehaveProblems wedontknowwehave
  • Some rights reserved by samsungtomorrowInvention was an accidentIt solved a problem people didn’t know they hadLike many of today's great inventions, the microwave oven was a by-product of another technology. It was during a radar-related research project around 1946 that Dr. Percy Spencer, a self-taught engineer with the Raytheon Corporation, noticed something very unusual. He was testing a new vacuum tube called a magnetron (we are searching for a picture of an actual 1946 magnetron), when he discovered that the candy bar in his pocket had melted. This intrigued Dr. Spencer, so he tried another experiment. This time he placed some popcorn kernels near the tube and, perhaps standing a little farther away, he watched with an inventive sparkle in his eye as the popcorn sputtered, cracked and popped all over his lab.The next morning, Scientist Spencer decided to put the magnetron tube near an egg. Spencer was joined by a curious colleague, and they both watched as the egg began to tremor and quake. The rapid temperature rise within the egg was causing tremendous internal pressure. Evidently the curious colleague moved in for a closer look just as the egg exploded and splattered hot yolk all over his amazed face.
  • Make fun of test pass rates here.
  • Let’s talk about failure
  • When it didn't work the first time, Edison made a note of exactly what he'd done and what components he had used. Then he made an adjustment to the experiment and tried again. And when that "failed" he made a note of that, readjusted and tried again. He kept learning from every experiment. He learned all the ways that it wouldn't work. He discovered all the chemicals and elements that wouldn't work. And each time he found a way that wouldn't work, he knew he was closer to finding a way that would work.
  • Iterate – ericries, the lean startup
  • Don’t get blockedSome rights reserved by freefotouk
  • Initiative
  • Experiment - Pilot / small team
  • Gary Panter (cartoonist)If you have one person you’re influenced by, everyone will say you’re the next whoever. But if you rip off a hundred people, everyone will say you’re so original.
  • Myths of Innovation – Scott BerkunWhere Good Ideas Come From – Steven JohnsonThey All Laughed – Ira FlatowBrain Rules – John MedinaSteal Like an Artist – Austin KleonThe Innovators Dilemma – Clayton Christensen

Transcript

  • 1. Test Innovation for Everyone Alan Page, Microsoft @esconfs www.eurostarconferences.com #esconfs
  • 2. Innovation
  • 3. Ideas
  • 4. TestInnovation
  • 5. TestIdeas
  • 6. I know quite certainly that I myself have no specialtalent. Curiosity, obsession and dogged endurance,combined with self-criticism, have brought me tomy ideas.
  • 7. Ideas
  • 8. We don’t know where we get our ideasfrom. What we do know is that we do not get them from our laptops.
  • 9. Ideas Ideas Ideas Ideas IdeasIdeas Ideas Ideas Ideas Ideas Ideas Ideas
  • 10. The Adjacent Possible “The premise that innovation prospers when ideas can serendipitously connect andrecombine with other ideas”
  • 11. Optimizing Application Performance
  • 12. program.exe
  • 13. program.exe
  • 14. program.exe
  • 15. program.exe - coverage reportFunction Total Blocks Blocks CoveredFoo 12 10Bar 16 8Baz 7 6Fizz 19 12
  • 16. Component CoverageFizz 70%Buzz 62%FizzBuzz 81%
  • 17. Component CoverageFizz 70%Buzz 62%FizzBuzz 81%
  • 18. Component TestsFizz a,b,d,e,f,g,yBuzz b,c,d,r,s,tFizzBuzz a,b,d,e,f,r,t,u,v,z
  • 19. Test Pass RateTest This 90%Test That 95%Test the other thing 98%
  • 20. Test Pass RateTest This 90%Test That 95%Test the other thing 98%
  • 21. Test History (Last 5) BugsTest This P, P, P, F, F 134, 157,154Test That F, P, F, P, F 174Test the P, P, P, P, P 132other thing
  • 22. “We now know athousand waysnot to build alight bulb”
  • 23. Know The ProblemQuestion The Problem Fail at the Problem See the (bigger) Problem
  • 24. The unit of progressfor Lean Startups isvalidated learning - arigorous method fordemonstratingprogress when one isembedded in the soilof extreme uncertainty
  • 25. “The way to get good ideas is to get lotsof ideas and throw the bad ones away”- Linus Pauling
  • 26. TestIdeas
  • 27. If you have oneperson you’reinfluenced by,everyone will sayyou’re the nextwhoever. But if yourip off a hundredpeople, everyone willsay you’re so original.- Gary Panter
  • 28. http://angryweasel.com/bloghttp://twitter.com/alanpage
  • 29. Photo Credits• Passport / safe slide – Some rights reserved by IceSabre (safe) – Some rights reserved by The Wide Wide World (passports) – Some rights reserved by Samantha Decker (map)• Microwave – Some rights reserved by samsungtomorrow• Dead End – Some rights reserved by freefotouk• Others are book covers or from Microsoft Clipart collection