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Figures of speech interactive presentation

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  • 1. Figures of Speech Introducing… Click on the arrow to go to the next slide.
  • 2. Introduction Authors often use figures of speech in both literature and poetry to enhance their writing. Figures of speech present ordinary things in new or unusual ways. They communicate ideas that go beyond the words’ usual, literal meanings. Click this arrow to go back one slide… Or this arrow to go to the next slide.
  • 3. Objectives
    • By the end of this class, you should be able to:
      • Recognize nine figures of speech
      • Identify figures of speech in poems
  • 4. Directions In the first section, you will be introduced to seven figures of speech and examples of each. You must correctly answer a multiple choice question about each term before moving on to the next. But don’t worry – you’ll be given a chance to review and re-do a question if you answer incorrectly.
  • 5. Imagery Descriptive writing that appeals to the senses (sight, taste, touch, smell, and hearing) Think of it this way: Definition: When a writer uses imagery, the descriptive writing helps create a picture or image in your mind. Imagery = Mental Image
  • 6. Imagery Example: The hot July sun cast an orange glare over the ocean waves.
  • 7. Imagery Another example: The cool waves crashed over my feet as we walked along the gritty sand.
  • 8. Which of the following is another example of imagery? (Click on a sentence to select your answer.) There is a white bird in the sky. The delicate white bird flew gracefully through the blue sky. I heard the birds and saw them flying. Click this arrow if you’d like to review before answering.
  • 9. Try Again Remember: When a writer uses imagery , he or she chooses words that will appeal to some or all of the reader’s five senses. Think about which of the sentences most appeals to your five senses. Click the arrow to try again.
  • 10. You’re Right! “ The delicate white bird flew gracefully through the blue sky” is an example of imagery because it gives the reader a mental image by appealing to the senses . Click the arrow to continue.
  • 11. Simile Comparing two unlike things using like or as Example: Definition: She ran like the wind. Running and the wind are unlike things. When you compare the speed of running to the speed of the wind, you are using a simile. Explanation:
  • 12. Simile More examples: The snow was as thick as a blanket. She was as light as a feather. You are acting like a baby. He felt like a bug under a microscope. His temper was as explosive as a volcano.
  • 13. Which of the following is NOT another example of a simile? (Click on a sentence to select your answer.) He’s as messy as a pig when he eats. He eats like a pig. He is a pig. Click this arrow if you’d like to review before answering. Read the question carefully before answering!
  • 14. Try Again
    • When a writer uses simile…
      • Two unlike things are being compared
      • The words like or as are being used to make the comparison
    Click the arrow to try again.
  • 15. You’re Right! “ He is a pig” is NOT a simile because even though it does compare two unlike things, it does not use the words like or as. Click the arrow to continue.
  • 16. Metaphor The definition of a metaphor is similar to the definition of a simile but there is one important difference between the two. There will also be two parts to the definition of a metaphor .
    • Remember the definition of simile has two parts:
      • Two unlike things are being compared
      • The words like or as are used to make the comparison
  • 17. Metaphor vs. Simile Use the following examples to figure out the definition of metaphor. Simile: Fido is like a teddy bear. Simile: Fido is as soft as a teddy bear. Metaphor: Fido is a teddy bear. Simile: That boy is like a pig. Simile: That boy is as messy as a pig. Metaphor: That boy is a pig.
  • 18. Which of the following is the correct definition for metaphor? (Click on a definition to select your answer.) Comparing two similar things by using like or as Comparing two similar things without using like or as Comparing two unlike things by using like or as Comparing two unlike things without using like or as Click this arrow if you’d like to review before answering.
  • 19. Try Again Take another look at these examples. Click the arrow to try again. Simile: Fido is like a teddy bear. Simile: Fido is as soft as a teddy bear. Metaphor: Fido is a teddy bear. Consider this…Are the two things being compared like or unlike each other? Are there keywords that are used in one figure of speech that are not used in the other?
  • 20. You’re Right! Although similes and metaphors both compare unlike things, metaphor do not use the words like or as .
  • 21. Alliteration Take a look at the following examples of alliteration. You will later select the best definition for this figure of speech. Brad wore his blue and brown blazer. Hank held his head high. Larry loves lemonade and lolly pops. Six swans went swimming in the sea.
  • 22. Alliteration Have you figured it out yet? Here are more examples to help refine your definition. Alliteration  Sue shook her silky silver hair as the sun was setting. NOT Alliteration  Elizabeth easily eyed an elephant in the elevator.
  • 23. Which of the following is the best definition for alliteration? (Click on a definition to select your answer.) Repetition of beginning consonant sounds Repetition of beginning vowel sounds Repetition of ending consonant sounds Repetition of ending vowel sounds Click this arrow if you’d like to review before answering.
  • 24. Try Again
    • Look at this example again.
      • Six swans went swimming in the sea.
    • Think about what is repeating.
    • Is it a consonant sound or a vowel sound?
    • Is it at the beginning or end of the words?
    Click the arrow to try again.
  • 25. You’re Right! Alliteration is the repetition of beginning consonant sounds, such as “ S ix s illy s wans went s wimming in the s ea.” It’s important to note that not every word in the sentence has to begin with the same letter in order for it to be considered alliteration. In the above example, only 5 out of 8 words begin with an “s”.
  • 26. Hyperbole Think about the following examples of hyperbole. You will later select the best definition for this figure of speech. My backpack weighs a ton.
  • 27. Hyperbole Another example: The wolf was 100 feet high.
  • 28. Hyperbole More examples: You could have knocked me over with a feather. I’ve told you a million times!
  • 29. Which of the following is the best definition for hyperbole? (Click on a definition to select your answer.) A major understatement; the opposite of exaggeration A true statement that accurately describes a person, place, or thing A major exaggeration or overstatement used for emphasis or humor Click this arrow if you’d like to review before answering.
  • 30. Try Again
    • Think about the examples again.
      • The wolf was 100 feet high.
      • My backpack weighs a ton.
    • Are these true statements?
    • Does it understate or overstate the truth?
    Click the arrow to try again.
  • 31. You’re Right! Hyperbole is a major exaggeration or overstatement. Authors use this figure of speech to emphasize a point or add humor. Think about many times in a day you exaggerate what you say and use hyperbole.
  • 32. Onomatopoeia Start thinking about what you think is best definition for this figure of speech. Buzz Ring When you see this: You often hear this: Buzz and ring are both examples of onomatopoeia.
  • 33. Onomatopoeia Boom Moo Quack When you see this: You often hear this: More examples:
  • 34. Which of the following is the best definition for onomatopoeia? (Click on a definition to select your answer.) A word that looks like its meaning A word that sounds like its meaning A word that only describes animal sounds Click this arrow if you’d like to review before answering.
  • 35. Try Again Think carefully about the words buzz , bang , and moo . Do these words look like their meanings? Do these words sound like their meanings? Do these words only describe sounds that animals make? Click the arrow to try again.
  • 36. You’re Right! Onomatopoeia is a word that sounds like its meaning. It can also be described as the use of a word which imitates a sound. Other examples include: screech, whirr, sizzle, crunch, bang, pow, zap, roar, growl, click, snap, crackle, and pop.
  • 37. Personification Giving human traits or characteristics to something that isn’t human, such as animals, objects or non-living things Think of it this way: Definition: When a writer uses personification, he or she gives characteristics of a person to an animal, object or thing.
  • 38. Personification Example: The willow tree shook her long hair. The example is referring to the way that the willow tree’s long branches sway in the wind. By saying “shook her long hair”, the tree is given characteristics of a human. Explanation:
  • 39. Personification More examples: The car danced across the icy road. The angry clouds marched across the sky. The stars in the clear night sky winked at me. The tulips nodded their heads in the breeze.
  • 40. Which of the following sentences contain personification? (Click on a sentence to select your answer.) The wind juggled the leaves. The wind blew the leaves. The wind moved the leaves. Click this arrow if you’d like to review before answering.
  • 41. Try Again Think carefully about the choices. The wind juggled the leaves. The wind blew the leaves. The wind moved the leaves. Which one of the verbs describes something that only a human does? Click the arrow to try again.
  • 42. You’re Right! “ The wind juggled the leaves” is an example of personification.
  • 43. Metonymy
    • Definition:
      • Something is named to replace something
      • closely related to it.
      • Example:
      • “ Feathers in my hair”
      • “ Applause”
      • The examples are used to replace social classes
      • (the rich and the famous)
  • 44. More examples:
    • Thirty hands are employed in that factory.
    • The hostess kept a good table .
  • 45. SYNECDOCHE
    • Definition:
      • The whole is replaced by the part or the part by the whole.
      • Example:
      • 50 heads of cattle
      • Explanation:
      • “ head” is used to mean whole animals.
  • 46.
    • More examples:
    • “ Best brains in the country”
  • 47. Part Two Directions You’ve made it through the first part of the tutorial! Now you will be given poems and asked to choose which figure of speech is shown. You will be able to look back at a definition page to help you along the way.
  • 48. Definitions Alliteration: Repetition of beginning consonant sounds Hyperbole: A major exaggeration or overstatement Imagery: Descriptive writing that appeals to the senses Metaphor: Comparing two unlike things without using like or as Onomatopoeia: A word that sounds like its meaning Personification: Giving human traits or characteristics to something that isn’t human Simile: Comparing two unlike things using like or as Click on the button to return to the previous slide.
  • 49. Untitled Bang! The starter’s gun— thin raindrops sprint. -Dorthi Charles Knock at a Star Which figure of speech is highlighted in the above poem? (Click on the figure of speech to select your answer.) Simile Alliteration Metaphor Onomatopoeia Click this button if you’d like to review the definition page before answering.
  • 50. Try Again Take a look at the definitions below and decide which figure of speech is being used when the poet says, “ Bang! ” Click the arrow to try again. Simile: Comparing two unlike things using like or as Alliteration: Repetition of beginning consonant sounds Metaphor: Comparing two unlike things without using like or as Onomatopoeia: A word that sounds like its meaning
  • 51. You’re Right! “ Bang!” is an example of onomatopoeia because it is a word that sounds like its meaning.
  • 52. “ The Wind” The wind stood up, and gave a shout; He whistled on his fingers , and Kicked the withered leaves about, And thumped the branches with his hand, And said he’ll kill, and kill, and kill; And so he will! And so he will! - James Stephens Knock at a Star Which figure of speech is highlighted in the above poem? Alliteration Personification Onomatopoeia Hyperbole
  • 53. Try Again Take a look at the definitions below and decide which figure of speech is being used when the poet says, “ The wind stood up, and gave a shout / He whistled on his fingers ”. Click the arrow to try again. Alliteration: Repetition of beginning consonant sounds Personification: Giving human traits to something that isn’t human Onomatopoeia: A word that sounds like its meaning Hyperbole: A major exaggeration or overstatement
  • 54. You’re Right! When James Stephens says, “The wind stood up, and gave a shout / He whistled on his fingers”, he is using personification . He is giving human characteristics, such as shouting and whistling on fingers, to the wind.
  • 55. “ The Runner” On a flat road runs the well-trained runner, He is lean and sinewy with muscular legs , He is thinly clothed , he leans forward as he runs, With lightly closed fists and arms partially raised . - Walt Whitman Knock at a Star Which figure of speech is highlighted in the above poem? Metaphor Personification Imagery Hyperbole
  • 56. Try Again Take a look at the definitions below and decide which figure of speech is being used when the poet says, “As he runs / With lightly closed fists and arms partially raised ”. Click the arrow to try again. Metaphor: Comparing two unlike things without using like or as Personification: Giving human traits to something that isn’t human Imagery: Descriptive writing that appeals to the senses Hyperbole: A major exaggeration or overstatement
  • 57. You’re Right! When Walt Whitman says, “As he runs / With lightly closed fists and arms partially raised”, he is using imagery . He is using descriptive writing that appeals to our sense of sight to help us create a mental image of the runner.
  • 58. “ Peach” Touch it to your cheek and it’s soft as a velvet newborn mouse who has to strive to be alive. Bite in. Runny honey blooms on your tongue- as if you’ve bitten open a whole hive. And so he will! And so he will! - Rose Rauter Knock at a Star Which figure of speech is highlighted in the above poem? Onomatopoeia Simile Hyperbole Metaphor
  • 59. Try Again Take a look at the definitions below and decide which figure of speech is being used when the poet says, “ It’s soft as a velvet newborn mouse ”. Click the arrow to try again. Onomatopoeia: A word that sounds like its meaning Simile: Comparing two unlike things using like or as Hyperbole: A major exaggeration or overstatement Metaphor: Comparing two unlike things without using like or as
  • 60. You’re Right! When Rose Rauter says, “It’s soft as a velvet newborn mouse”, she is using a simile . She uses the word as to compare two unlike things (a peach and a mouse).
  • 61. Excerpt from “I’m Proud of My Preposterpus” I’m proud of my Preposterpus, so ponderous and pale, I love the way it whistles when it swizzles ginger ale. It’s magnificent in stature, fully twenty-four feet tall, so it tends to draw attention when I take it to the mall. - Jack Pretulsky A Pizza the Size of the Sun Which figure of speech is highlighted in the above poem? Hyperbole Alliteration Onomatopoeia Metaphor
  • 62. Try Again Take a look at the definitions below and decide which figure of speech is being used when the poet says, “ I’m proud of my Preposterpus /so ponderous and pale ”. Click the arrow to try again. Hyperbole: A major exaggeration or overstatement Alliteration: Repetition of beginning consonant sounds Onomatopoeia: A word that sounds like its meaning Metaphor: Comparing two unlike things without using like or as
  • 63. You’re Right! When Jack Prelutsky says, “I’m p roud of my P reposterpus / so p onderous and p ale”, he is using alliteration . He is repeating the beginning consonant sound of “p” while he is describing the Preposterpus.
  • 64. “ Dreams” Hold fast to dreams For if dreams die Life is a broken-winged bird That cannot fly.   Hold fast to dreams For when dreams go Life is a barren field Frozen with snow. - Langston Hughes The Dream Keeper and Other Poems Which figure of speech is highlighted in the above poem? Simile Personification Metaphor Onomatopoeia
  • 65. Try Again Take a look at the definitions below and decide which figure of speech is being used when the poet says, “ Life is a broken-winged bird / That cannot fly. ” Click the arrow to try again. Simile: Comparing two unlike things using like or as Personification: Giving human traits or characteristics to something that isn’t human Metaphor: Comparing two unlike things without using like or as Onomatopoeia: A word that sounds like its meaning
  • 66. You’re Right! When Langston Hughes says, “Life is a broken-winged bird / That cannot fly”, he is using a metaphor . He compares two unlike things (life and a bird) without using the words like or as .
  • 67. “ A Pizza the Size of the Sun” I’m making a pizza the size of the sun, a pizza that’s sure to weigh more than a ton, a pizza too massive to pick up and toss, a pizza resplendent with oceans of sauce. I’m topping my pizza with mountains of cheese, with acres of peppers, pimentos, and peas, with mushrooms, tomatoes, and sausage galore, with every last olive they had at the store. My pizza is sure to be one of a kind, my pizza will leave other pizzas behind, my pizza will be a delectable treat that all who love pizza are welcome to eat. The oven is hot, I believe it will take a year and a half for my pizza to bake. I hardly can wait till my pizza is done, my wonderful pizza is the size of the sun. - Jack Pretulsky A Pizza the Size of the Sun Which figure of speech is highlighted in the above poem? Onomatopoeia Simile Hyperbole Personification
  • 68. Try Again Take a look at the definitions below and decide which figure of speech is being used when the poet says, “ I’m making a pizza the size of the sun / a pizza that’s sure to weigh more than a ton ”. Click the arrow to try again. Onomatopoeia: A word that sounds like its meaning Simile: Comparing two unlike things using like or as Hyperbole: A major exaggeration or overstatement Personification: Giving human traits or characteristics to something that isn’t human
  • 69. You’re Right! When Jack Prelutsky says “I’m making a pizza the size of the sun / a pizza that’s sure to weigh more than a ton,” he is using hyperbole . He is exaggerating about the size of the pizza that is being made.
  • 70. Congratulations, You’re Done! You’ve completed the entire tutorial. You were able to recognize and identify seven figures of speech. Important: Keep this screen open and raise your hand to show your teacher that you have reached this final page. Click the arrow to see the bibliography for this tutorial.
  • 71. Bibliography Hughes, Langston. The Dream Keeper and Other Poems . Scholastic, Inc.: New York, 1996. Kennedy, X. J., and Kennedy, Dorothy. Knock at a Star . Little, Brown and Company: New York, 1999. Prelutsky, Jack. A Pizza the Size of the Sun . Scholastic, Inc.: New York, 1996. Click here to close the tutorial.