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Literary Terms
Literary Terms
Literary Terms
Literary Terms
Literary Terms
Literary Terms
Literary Terms
Literary Terms
Literary Terms
Literary Terms
Literary Terms
Literary Terms
Literary Terms
Literary Terms
Literary Terms
Literary Terms
Literary Terms
Literary Terms
Literary Terms
Literary Terms
Literary Terms
Literary Terms
Literary Terms
Literary Terms
Literary Terms
Literary Terms
Literary Terms
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Literary Terms

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  • 1. • a work in which the characters and events are to be understood as representing other things, usually a deeper, often spiritual, moral, or political meaning.• Ex. The Lord of the Flies
  • 2. • is the repetition of sounds in words of close prximity • generally more than 2 wordsEx. I stood still and stopped the sound of feet -from Acquainted with the Night by Robert Frost
  • 3. • a brief reference to a person, event, or place, real or fictitious, or to a work of art.• used to create a deeper meaning or understanding Ex. He has the patience of Job.
  • 4. • a similarity in some respects between things otherwise unlike• like a metaphor, but with more elaboration
  • 5. • the method used by a writer to develop a character. • point of view • actions • personality • values • physical attributes
  • 6. • a struggle between opposing forces• conflict may be internal or external • man vs. self (internal) • man vs. man • man vs. nature • man v.s society• a conflict is essential in a story
  • 7. • a writer‟s choice of words, phrases, sentence structures, and figurative language which combine to help create meaning
  • 8. • hints about what will come later in the story
  • 9. • an obvious exaggeration used for effect • Ex. I called you a million times today.
  • 10. • language that evokes one or all of the five senses • Imagery is typically used to create a deeper understanding of theme, characters, setting,etc.Ex. "A host of golden daffodils; / Beside the lake, beneath the trees, / Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.” -I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud, William Wordsworth
  • 11. • The disconnect between what actually happens and what might be expected to happen.Situational: when and event is opposite of what would be expectedDramatic: when the audience or reader is aware of something important but the characters in the story are not aware.Verbal: what is said and what is meant are opposite
  • 12. • a comparison of two unlike things• Often uses "to be“ verbs (is, am, are, was, were, etc.) instead of using „like‟ or „as‟• Ex. Her eyes are crystal lakes.• Ex. I am an abandoned house.
  • 13. • the emotional and/or physical atmosphere created by the setting and descriptions
  • 14. • an important and sometimes recurring theme or idea
  • 15. • putting two contradictory words together Ex. Deafening silence, a wise fool
  • 16. • a statement, proposition, or situation that seems to be absurd or contradictory, but in fact is or may be true. Ex. “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.” A Tale of Two Cities
  • 17. • a piece of writing that deliberately copies or imitates another work in order to comment or critique it. Ex. Tina Fey does a parady of Sarah Palin.
  • 18. • human qualities are attributed to inanimate objects• abstract concepts are represented as a person.Ex. The flowers danced in the wind.Poseidon is the personification of the sea
  • 19. • sequence of events in a story Includes: Rising action Climax Falling Action Resolution
  • 20. • the person or entity through whom the reader experiences the story• Perspectives include: 1st person 2nd person 3rd person (limited, omniscient, objective)
  • 21. • is the use of wit, especially irony, sarcasm, and ridicule, to critique politics and society.
  • 22. • the time and place where a story occurs• setting can also be a character (Castaway, Into the Wild)
  • 23. • a comparison between two unlike things• most often uses „like‟ or „as‟Ex. “My love is like a red, red rose.”
  • 24. • the use of something concrete to represent something abstractEx. A dove symbolizes peace.
  • 25. • the main idea or message of a piece • Theme is NEVER just one word. “Love” isn‟t a theme “Love endures all things” is a themeEx. The idea that human beings are essentiallybrutal, savage creatures provides the central theme of thenovel
  • 26. • the attitude of the speaker/narrator as established through the language of the pieceEx. The poem has a bitter tone, revealing the speaker‟s anger and resentment.

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