Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Aitpm 2010 National Conference Paper Ajbv2
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Aitpm 2010 National Conference Paper Ajbv2

396
views

Published on

This is my AITPM conference presentation from 21/7/10

This is my AITPM conference presentation from 21/7/10


0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
396
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. AITPM 2010 National Conference    “What’s new?”    Implementing ‐ A Traffic Management Centre (The people are important)      Version   2 – 7/5/10    Presenter:   Andy Blunden    Co Authors:  Dave Grosse – Queensland Department Transport and Main Roads    Company:   McCormick Rankin Cagney    Address:   Level 1, 50 Park Road Milton Queensland  4064    Client:  Queensland  Department  Transport and Main Roads, South Coast Region      Contact  Andy Blunden    Phone   07 33203600  Mobile  0418624458    Email  ablunden@mrcagney.com        The Refurbished Traffic Management Centre Nerang    Implementing a Traffic Management Centre (The people are important!) V2  Page 1   
  • 2.   Contents  Abstract: ................................................................................................................................................. 3  Introduction ............................................................................................................................................ 3  Operational Review Project Objectives .................................................................................................. 4  The Project Tasks and Issues .................................................................................................................. 5  Knowledge Architecture .................................................................................................................... 5  Knowledge capture (existing processes) ............................................................................................ 6  Integration of new Traffic Management Centre technologies .......................................................... 6  Developing the Learning Curriculum ................................................................................................. 6  Create a ‘Body Of Knowledge’ supporting exceptional skills ............................................................. 7  Tunnel incident management and systems procedures .................................................................... 8  Functional structure design and reclassification ............................................................................... 9  Recruitment of operators .................................................................................................................. 9  Develop 24 hour shift structure ......................................................................................................... 9  Knowledge transfer to Department of Transport and Main Roads Staff  .......................................... 9  . Implement a balanced scorecard ..................................................................................................... 10  Implement a revised Traffic Response Service ................................................................................ 10  Tugun Tunnel Go live ....................................................................................................................... 10  Unique Issues, and Challenges ............................................................................................................. 11  Methodology ........................................................................................................................................ 11  Key techniques utilized during the project ...................................................................................... 11  Project Results Summary  ..................................................................................................................... 12  . Key Lessons ...................................................................................................................................... 12  Success Criteria ................................................................................................................................ 13  Opportunities ................................................................................................................................... 13  Conclusions ...................................................................................................................................... 14  References ............................................................................................................................................ 14        Implementing a Traffic Management Centre (The people are important!) V2  Page 2   
  • 3.   Abstract:    Many complex technical and engineering projects fail to adequately address the work design and  operational planning necessary to fully realize the benefits of the technologies. The effectiveness of  intelligent transport systems (ITS) within the redesigned Traffic Management Centre (Traffic  Management Centre) at Nerang and the remote operation of complex plant equipment and facilities at  the Tugun tunnel could only be delivered by a strategy that delivered rapid operator competency,  knowledge and confidence. Knowledge system design and implementation therefore needed to support  the technical, operational and business outcomes in parallel with the physical implementation task.   Web based and best practice procedures and a comprehensive learning curriculum were developed to  support delivery of the project and business outcomes and to enhance the Traffic Management Centre  ability to provide a rapid on road incident response.   This project underscored better integration of  technical systems, work design and knowledge management and McCormick Rankin Cagney together  with the Queensland  Department  of Transport and Main Roads effectively implemented operation  solutions for the Traffic Management Centre and Tugun tunnel projects.  Introduction    The Queensland Department of Transport and Main Roads in the South Coast Hinterland required an  upgrade of their Nerang Traffic Management Centre as well as a parallel operational review of the  Centre operations.   In part the need for the centre and technology upgrade requirements were driven  by the complexity and additional demands of the new Tugun Motorway which opened in April 2008.    In parallel with the tight tunnel and Traffic Management Centre  construction deadlines, the operational  review delivered a more workable structure supporting 24 hour shift coverage, recruited and trained  new staff and re engineered the operating processes supporting the new ITS technologies, the centre  and the Tugun tunnel.     To underpin operations McCormick Rankin Cagney and Department of Transport & Main Roads   recognised a need to develop a knowledge architecture including comprehensive incident management  procedures and a competency based training curriculum.  The knowledge architecture included  development of a centre of excellence approach incorporating an on line Body of Knowledge website  containing all critical incident, operational and support information needed by operators to run the  centre and deliver the regional operations goals.    The project involved integrating the project management tasks of centre refurbishment and tunnel  construction with development of systems, operations design, recruitment, training and commissioning,  all while the existing Traffic Management Centre remained operational.    From a technology point of view a Traffic Management Centre operates a complex network of CCTV  cameras, Variable message signs, Traffic signals, and other smart incident detection systems to identify  respond and coordinate incidents on the Department of Transport & Main Roads road network.  Implementing a Traffic Management Centre (The people are important!) V2  Page 3   
  • 4.   In addition the centre provides motorist information via web, radio, phone and variable message signs.      Incidents can include crashes, breakdowns, fire, weather events and congestion.  The Traffic  Management Centre also coordinates the Traffic response service to assist emergency services on  location at incidents.    The addition of the Tugun tunnel introduced additional operational complexity to the Traffic  Management Centre.  Tunnels contain complex air quality monitoring, fans, fire deluge systems, sumps,  pumps, lighting, evacuation and in the Tugun case an additional wholly separate Motorway  Management system, all to be managed via software and communication links remotely by operators  from the Traffic Management Centre at Nerang.  McCormick Rankin Cagney recognized that effective  Socio Technical System design was a key requirement of the project    Under an arrangement between the Queensland and NSW governments the tunnel will be operated by  Queensland for the first ten years and then by NSW.   The Road Traffic Authority in NSW is able to jointly  monitor the Tunnel from NSW.    By carefully considering the people issues, how their environment was to be changed and the key  learning needs and support requirements, a parallel Traffic Management Centre and Tugun operational  review project delivered operator competence underpinning the successful delivery of the infrastructure  projects.  Operational Review Project Objectives    The goals of the project were to:    • Review and modernize the Traffic Management Centre Nerang for Queensland  Department of  Transport and Main Roads, South Coast Region  • Maintain the old centre and operations while the project is delivered  • Capture and codify existing operational knowledge and develop new knowledge supporting Tugun  tunnel technologies and processes and new Traffic Management Centre technologies.  • Implement state of the art technologies including the new Meridian Motorway Management  program  • Support Tugun Tunnel operational readiness for the motorway opening through competent  operators.  • Expand the South Coast Traffic Management Centre  to a 24 hour operational  basis  • Improve incident management response consistency, professionalism and safety in the region via a  more proactive (rather than reactive) Traffic Management Centre   • Improve relationships with key incident stakeholders (police, ambulance, fire, towing, public)  through professional incident responses led by the Traffic Management Centre   • Model the project knowledge for prospective future applications  • Revise and re implement the previously trialed Traffic Response Service for the region          Implementing a Traffic Management Centre (The people are important!) V2  Page 4   
  • 5. The Project Tasks and Issues    Knowledge Architecture    Knowledge Architecture is applying an information architecture to management of knowledge by using the skills for defining and designing information to establish an environment conducive to managing knowledge. The following diagram illustrates the complex relationship between operating principles, policies,  procedures and the competency based learning curriculum to manage the Traffic Management Centre  knowledge.          Implementing a Traffic Management Centre (The people are important!) V2  Page 5   
  • 6.   Knowledge capture (existing processes)    Initial analysis showed that much of the operator knowledge prior to the project was ‘trapped  knowledge’ i.e. held in the heads of existing operators and not adequately recorded as best practice  procedures.  Without written processes, it would not be possible to train and support a larger team of  new operators for the Traffic Management Centre and Tugun motorway opening.   In addition there was  only a limited capability and resource availability within the Traffic Management Centre for writing  operational processes and no one available to conduct business process re engineering.    Integration of new Traffic Management Centre technologies    In addition to capturing the existing operations knowledge there was a need to pay attention to the  Socio Technical System, and rapidly receive, digest and codify the knowledge relevant to the newly built  Tugun Tunnel, Motorway Management System and the new systems to be introduced in the Traffic  Management Centre.  There was a real danger that many of the systems would not be completed and  installed in sufficient time to train the ‘yet to be recruited’ operators.  A Socio‐technical systems  approach (STS) considers the interrelationships between people and technology to ensure that  installing new technology actually contributes to performance.    Developing the Learning Curriculum    To recruit and train the incoming operators in time it would be necessary to develop comprehensive  training, and this would need to be competency based (especially relating to tunnel safety systems) and  based on operating procedures.  As many of the systems would not be operational until close to opening  the task of writing operational procedures and the learning curriculum would need to be performed on  a short time frame and in parallel.      Implementing a Traffic Management Centre (The people are important!) V2  Page 6   
  • 7. One of eight modules  developed for the  operator learning  curriculum      Create a ‘Body Of Knowledge’ supporting exceptional skills    As the operators would sometimes be working alone over 24 hours, it would be necessary to develop an  easily accessible ‘on line’ body of knowledge containing all work instructions, policies, incident and  operations procedures and training materials.  These would need to be stand alone and cover all known  incident types.    The Traffic Management  Centre Body of Knowledge  home page            Implementing a Traffic Management Centre (The people are important!) V2  Page 7   
  • 8. Tunnel incident management and systems procedures    Operation of a tunnel requires operational incident response procedures based on the risk profile of the  infrastructure.  A comprehensive set of tunnel incident response procedures was created for the Tugun  tunnel to assist operators to deal with all foreseen events.          One of the key Tugun Tunnel incident procedures supporting operator response and public safety      Implementing a Traffic Management Centre (The people are important!) V2  Page 8   
  • 9.   Functional structure design and reclassification    Staffing the Traffic Management Centre required a review of the structure, the role classifications of the  operators and the job descriptions.  The competencies and personal attributes required to manage  complex tunnel management systems and a motorway management system required careful  consideration and an upward classification adjustment together with altered job descriptions.    Recruitment of operators    Recruitment of operators included psychometric testing in an effort to better match the requirements of  the role with applicants.        A Senior Operator at the Nerang Traffic Management Centre console  Develop 24 hour shift structure    The operation of the Tugun tunnel required that the TMC be staffed 24 hours per day, and a rotating  shift roster was developed by a separate specialist shift company.  Shift change management issues  included the consideration of fatigue, annual leave and different staffing levels for daily peaks.  The shift  structure also required that the payroll system  be adjusted to cater for the new shifts.    Knowledge transfer to Department of Transport and Main Roads Staff    The consultant was required to transfer key knowledge to DTMR staff to ensure that the key  organizational knowledge repository (BOK) was maintained in house.  Additionally an internal Double  learning loop was required in the form of an ability to debrief incidents.      According to Chris Argyris, Double‐loop learning occurs when error is detected and corrected in ways  that involve the modification of an organization’s underlying norms, policies and objectives.       Implementing a Traffic Management Centre (The people are important!) V2  Page 9   
  • 10.   Implement a balanced scorecard    A Kaplan and Norton style balanced scorecard was developed to track the Traffic Management  Operational performance.  Implement a revised Traffic Response Service    Supporting the review of the Traffic Management Centre and increase operational hours, the Traffic  Response Service was expanded and re implemented in the South Coast Region          A Traffic Response operator with vehicle    Tugun Tunnel Go live    Supported by the newly refurbished 24 hour Traffic Management Centre at Nerang the Tugun tunnel  was opened early.  Operators were involved in Tunnel System testing, tours of the facility and  familiarized in the use of the fully equipped Tunnel Control building.        The Tugun Tunnel Opening  Implementing a Traffic Management Centre (The people are important!) V2  Page 10   
  • 11. Unique Issues, and Challenges    Despite comprehensive project planning and coordination with the Tunnel construction personnel, the  project was completed early and this required considerable rescheduling of testing and operator  training time.  (Testing of fire deluge systems etc could not occur while the motorway was open and  therefore training and testing required the tunnel to be closed)    During the early days of the Tunnel operation operators also managed the tunnel initially from the  Tunnel Control building at Tugun.  Methodology    In general the project management approach incorporated continuous communication between the  client and consultant through a steering committee mechanism, a detailed change management  program and where ever possible continuous involvement of existing staff in project activities, leading  to enhanced ownership of project outcomes and superior knowledge.      The PM Bok project management methodology was utilised by the consultant and ensured on time  delivery and a high quality outcome for the client.    Key techniques utilized during the project    Several techniques were utilized during the project to underpin the success.  These were:    • Continuous coaching of existing and the newly recruited operators  • Knowledge transfer through the constant operator involvement and co location of the consultant  • Competency mapping and testing  • Earliest escalation of any issues to the steering committee  • Constant contact with Tugun tunnel and Traffic Management Centre  project managers  • Involvement of the operators in Tunnel system testing  • Specialist support and coaching of staff during implementation  • Use of Debriefings as a  learning loop to reincorporate learning as knowledge  • Hands on Training of operators wherever possible  • Having fun – no matter what the pressure  • Engendering pride in achievements, promoting successes          Implementing a Traffic Management Centre (The people are important!) V2  Page 11   
  • 12. Project Results Summary      Miles Vass previous District Director, Warren Pitt (previous Minister Main Roads) and Andy Blunden McCormick Rankin  Cagney at the Traffic Management Centre opening      Project results were:    • Traffic Management Centre staffing restructured and operator reclassification completed  • Team leader, coordinator and operators recruited and trained to competency prior to tunnel  opening  • Operational knowledge converted to best practice incident procedures  • A competency based learning curriculum implemented  • Comprehensive Body of Knowledge in place at Nerang Traffic Management Centre  • Traffic Management Centre Nerang fully renovated and operational prior to Tugun motorway  opening  • Traffic Response service re implemented and operational  • Debriefing (learning loop) process implemented  • Operators reached competency standards in a greatly reduced time frame and displayed superior  incident response skills  • Improving relationships and reputation with emergency services    Key Lessons    This project delivered some key lessons to the project team:    1. We should have over recruited operators (or taken on casuals) to mitigate any losses of operators  during the key implementation period.  There was an early loss of operators (resignation) and this  put pressure on the newly established training plans and shift staffing  arrangements.  2. Late design changes to Tunnel systems and equipment meant that procedures and training modules  had to occur in very short time frames.   Implementing a Traffic Management Centre (The people are important!) V2  Page 12   
  • 13. 3. Early tunnel opening resulted in a reduction in ‘Sea trials’ which in turn created training logistics  issues i.e. we could not train until it was operational and once it was operational it was already in  ‘real use’ thus limiting scenario training  4. Human nature is such that under pressure there will be a reversion to known behaviours, the coach  needs to be there continuously to prevent ‘slip back’ into old habits  5. We needed to continuously re emphasise the end performance requirement in order to keep the  focus on not only implementation but the business goals i.e. the reasons for the project  6. The cultural change and ownership benefits come mainly from ‘doing it with the people’, ‘not for  them or to them!’  7. Project leaders need to know when to cut and run (when something isn’t working) and be prepared  to change it quickly  8. Shift structures are extremely difficult to implement and are even harder to change once in place.  It  is infinitely better to spend more time and get them completely right prior to implementation rather  than change them once in place.  9. Once an Alliance infrastructure project team disbands it is extremely difficult to pick up the pieces  and or find someone to tell you how something works!  10. Make sure that whatever you are doing you make it fun!    Success Criteria    During the project we applied the following criteria to assess our success:    • Timeliness  • Objectives achievement  • Compliance with agreements  • Level of operational disruption  • Operator competency and readiness  • The degree of ownership of knowledge  • The TMC reputation  • The health of key relationships (police, ambulance, fire)  • Public comments and press  Opportunities    There is an opportunity to replicate the project model used in this project to other sites and major  infrastructure projects as the lessons, templates and models have been captured and codified.      This should represent a key cost saving for future projects if applied.      Implementing a Traffic Management Centre (The people are important!) V2  Page 13   
  • 14.   Conclusions    Proper planning for and integration of the socio technical system i.e. the human issues, processes, skills  and impacts of technology and infrastructure projects is critical to the successful realization of a project  and the achievement of organizational objectives.    This project is a useful model for implementation of other Traffic Management Centres and or major  infrastructure implementations.  References  Tom Reamy‐ Chief Knowledge Architect ‐KAPS Group ‐ Knowledge Architecture    Harvard Business Review ‐ Using the Balanced Scorecard as a Strategic Management System  Robert S Kaplan, David P Norton  Chris Argyris ‐ Theories of action, double loop learning and organizational learning  Socio‐ technical systems Xi Liu and Craig Errey (2006)  PMBOK Guide - Fourth Edition 2008.   Eric Trist & K. Bamforth (1951). Some social and psychological consequences of the longwall  method of coal getting, in: Human Relations, 4, pp.3‐38. p.7‐9. p.20‐21.  P.V.R. Carvalho (2006). "Ergonomic field studies in a nuclear power plant control room".  In: Progress in Nuclear Energy, 48, pp. 51‐69  A. Rice (1958). Productivity and social organisation: The Ahmedabad experiment. London:  Tavistock.  A. Cherns (1976). "The principles of socio technical design". In: Human Relations. Vol 29(8),  pp.783‐792. p.786    Implementing a Traffic Management Centre (The people are important!) V2  Page 14   

×