0
© 2014 IBM Corporation
Connecting IBM MessageSight
to the Enterprise (IOT-1900)
Andrew Schofield
Chief Architect, IBM Mess...
Please Note
IBM’s statements regarding its plans, directions, and intent are subject to change
or withdrawal without notic...
IBM MessageSight
3
• A purpose-built messaging appliance
• The gateway to the Internet of Things for the enterprise
• Fast...
Connecting IBM MessageSight to the Enterprise
4
MessageSight [Primary]
MessageSight [Standby]
Mobile
Andriod
Mobile
iOS
Mo...
Connecting to IBM MQ
Extend the reach of your MQ infrastructure
Plug directly into your enterprise
with built-in MQ connectivity
Securely exten...
Setting up MQ connectivity
MQ connectivity is built in to IBM MessageSight
Very simple to set up
Queue manager connection
...
Destination mapping rule
Destination mapping rules are uni-directional
• Can map from MessageSight to MQ, or from MQ to Me...
Pattern 1: Fan-out broadcast
Same data sent to all devices subscribed to common topic
• Business example: reference data, ...
Pattern 2: Fan-out notification
Publisher publishes to per-device topic
• Business example: commands sent to a device, e.g...
Pattern 3: Fan-in notification
Each device publishes to one or per-device MessageSight topic
• Business example: sensors
1...
Pattern 4: Fan-in request-reply
Device publishes request to common topic and awaits response
• Business example: device po...
Pattern 5: Fan-out request-reply
Publisher publishes to per-device topic and awaits response
• Business example: control c...
Retained messages
Retained messages can be forwarded to or from MQ
You choose administratively whether messages are publis...
Securing the connection to MQ
Secure the connection between IBM MessageSight and MQ
with SSL/TLS
• Create a key repository...
Authorization in MQ
Authorization of IBM MessageSight clients takes place on the appliance
• Define connection and messagi...
High availability
For IBM MessageSight
MQ connectivity works just the same on a single appliance or a
high-availability pa...
Performance considerations
IBM MessageSight is fast, very fast
• Most other middleware simply cannot keep up
• At millions...
Connecting to
IBM Integration Bus
Connecting to IBM Integration Bus
Two new patterns for integrating IBM MessageSight with back-
end systems
• Patterns enca...
Inbound Event Filter Pattern
MessageSight routes events into Integration Bus via JMS
It narrows down events using a filter...
Outbound Event Notification Pattern
Integration Bus receives events from a back-end system
MessageSight receives them usin...
Connecting using JMS and MQTT nodes
JMS
• IBM MessageSight is used just like any other JMS provider
• Download and install...
Connecting to
Application Servers
JCA Resource Adapter
IBM MessageSight v1.1 introduced a Resource Adapter
• Comes as part of the IBM MessageSight Client Pa...
Configuring for outbound communication
Use J2C connection factories and administered destinations
• Resources > Resource A...
Configuration for inbound communication
JMS messages received by Message-Driven Beans
Use J2C activation specification
• R...
Configuration for sharing and concurrency
With appropriate settings you can get:
• Concurrent delivery of messages in a si...
Scenario 1: Workload balancing in one server?
29
Message-Driven Bean
Message-Driven Bean
Message-Driven Bean
Subscription
...
Scenario 1: Workload balancing in one server!
30
Message-Driven Bean
Message-Driven Bean
Message-Driven Bean
Shared Subscr...
Scenario 2: Workload balancing in a cluster
31
Shared Subscription
Message-Driven Bean
Message-Driven Bean
Message-Driven ...
Scenario 3: Message delivery with high availability
32
Message-Driven Bean
Message-Driven Bean
Message-Driven Bean
Shared ...
Connecting to
IBM InfoSphere Streams
Big data meets big connectivity
34
Smarter Decisions
Powerful
analytics
IBM MessageSight
IBM InfoSphere Streams
Smarter ac...
Use case: Real-time analytics
35
car/1
car/2
car/<ID>
IBM InfoSphere
Streams
(decisioning, analytics)
car/<ID>
alert/car/<...
Connecting to IBM InfoSphere Streams
InfoSphere Streams V3.2 introduced support for MQTT
Messaging Toolkit includes 2 MQTT...
Questions?
Come and hear about MessageSight at Impact 2014
Monday
4:00-5:00 PM
IOT-1899 Introduction to IBM
MessageSight
Palazzo F
Tu...
We Value Your Feedback
Don’t forget to submit your Impact session and speaker
feedback! Your feedback is very important to...
Thank You
Legal Disclaimer
• © IBM Corporation 2014. All Rights Reserved.
• The information contained in this publication is provide...
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Connecting IBM MessageSight to the Enterprise

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Come and learn how to easily connect IBM MessageSight to your enterprise systems to get the full benefits from the Internet of Things and Mobile. We'll cover connecting to IBM Integration Bus (IIB), MQ, Application Servers, and analytics with InfoSphere Streams.

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Transcript of "Connecting IBM MessageSight to the Enterprise"

  1. 1. © 2014 IBM Corporation Connecting IBM MessageSight to the Enterprise (IOT-1900) Andrew Schofield Chief Architect, IBM MessageSight
  2. 2. Please Note IBM’s statements regarding its plans, directions, and intent are subject to change or withdrawal without notice at IBM’s sole discretion. Information regarding potential future products is intended to outline our general product direction and it should not be relied on in making a purchasing decision. The information mentioned regarding potential future products is not a commitment, promise, or legal obligation to deliver any material, code or functionality. Information about potential future products may not be incorporated into any contract. The development, release, and timing of any future features or functionality described for our products remains at our sole discretion. Performance is based on measurements and projections using standard IBM benchmarks in a controlled environment. The actual throughput or performance that any user will experience will vary depending upon many factors, including considerations such as the amount of multiprogramming in the user’s job stream, the I/O configuration, the storage configuration, and the workload processed. Therefore, no assurance can be given that an individual user will achieve results similar to those stated here.
  3. 3. IBM MessageSight 3 • A purpose-built messaging appliance • The gateway to the Internet of Things for the enterprise • Fast, lightweight, secure, reliable messaging for Mobile
  4. 4. Connecting IBM MessageSight to the Enterprise 4 MessageSight [Primary] MessageSight [Standby] Mobile Andriod Mobile iOS Mobile Tablet MQTT MQTT MQTT over websockets MQTT over websockets MQTT MQTT MQTT DMZ Sensor (Embedded C) Sensor Sensor JEE Server (WAS) JEE Server (WAS) Resource Adapter JMS Java Application MQTT MQ C Application IBM MQ System Admin Browser Internet Intranet
  5. 5. Connecting to IBM MQ
  6. 6. Extend the reach of your MQ infrastructure Plug directly into your enterprise with built-in MQ connectivity Securely extends existing enterprise messaging infrastructures Accelerate massive fan-out message delivery to huge numbers of devices Reliable bi-directional messaging enabling intelligent decisions based on real-time events 6 Real-time big data IBM MessageSight IBM MQ Massive-scale concurrent connectivity for machine-to-machine and mobile use cases
  7. 7. Setting up MQ connectivity MQ connectivity is built in to IBM MessageSight Very simple to set up Queue manager connection Defines how to connect to a queue manager • Queue manager name • Connection name – host name, port • Channel name – server-connection channel • SSL cipher specification (optional) Destination mapping rule Defines source and target of messages • Rule type – topic-to-topic, topic-to-queue, … • Queue manager connection – one or more • Maximum messages to buffer for transmission • Retained messages? 7 How to connect to MQ Queue manager connection Source and target of messages Destination mapping rule
  8. 8. Destination mapping rule Destination mapping rules are uni-directional • Can map from MessageSight to MQ, or from MQ to MessageSight 8 Topic-to-topic Topic subtree-to-queue Queue-to-topicTopic subtree-to-topic subtree PriceUpdate PriceUpdate AllDiagLogs Diagnostics Car123 Car345 ServiceDue Car123 Car345 Service Car123 Car345 Updates PatchQueue
  9. 9. Pattern 1: Fan-out broadcast Same data sent to all devices subscribed to common topic • Business example: reference data, price list, catalog 9 Topic-to-topic mapping destTopicsourceTopic Publish “sourceTopic” Subscribe “destTopic”
  10. 10. Pattern 2: Fan-out notification Publisher publishes to per-device topic • Business example: commands sent to a device, e.g. “sync now” 10 Subtree-to-subtree mapping source device1 device2 device3 dest device1 device2 device3 Publish “source/deviceID” Subscribe “dest/deviceID”
  11. 11. Pattern 3: Fan-in notification Each device publishes to one or per-device MessageSight topic • Business example: sensors 11 Topic-to-topic mapping sourceTopicdestTopic Subtree-to-subtree mapping source device1 device2 dest device1 device2 Publish “sourceTopic” Subscribe “destTopic” Publish “source/deviceID” Subscribe “dest/#”
  12. 12. Pattern 4: Fan-in request-reply Device publishes request to common topic and awaits response • Business example: device polling control center for updated info 12 Subtree-to-subtree mapping requestDest requestSrc Publish “requestSrc” Subscribe “requestDest” Topic-to-topic mapping replySrc device1 device2 replyDest device1 device2 Publish “replySrc/deviceID” Subscribe “replyDest/deviceID” Request message contains routing information for reply
  13. 13. Pattern 5: Fan-out request-reply Publisher publishes to per-device topic and awaits response • Business example: control center interrogating device 13 Subtree-to-subtree mapping requestSrc device1 device2 requestDest device1 device2 Publish “requestSrc/deviceID” Subscribe “requestDest/deviceID” Subtree-to-subtree mapping replyDest device1 device2 replySrc device1 device2 Publish “replySrc/deviceID” Subscribe “replyDest/#” Request message contains routing information for reply
  14. 14. Retained messages Retained messages can be forwarded to or from MQ You choose administratively whether messages are published as retained on the target system • Affects all messages published, regardless of initial publish Restrictions: • Destination-mapping rule can only be associated with 1 QM • Target cannot be a queue 14
  15. 15. Securing the connection to MQ Secure the connection between IBM MessageSight and MQ with SSL/TLS • Create a key repository in the same way as you do when using SSL/TLS with MQ • Upload the key repository on to the MessageSight appliance • Specify the SSL/TLS cipher specification in the queue manager connections • You can choose between self-signed certificates and CA certificates 15
  16. 16. Authorization in MQ Authorization of IBM MessageSight clients takes place on the appliance • Define connection and messaging policies in the normal way MQ connectivity connects securely to MQ using a single user ID • Obtain a user ID on the queue manager’s system • Create a channel authentication record permitting IBM MessageSight to connect to the queue manager, specifying the user ID above • Grant authorization to these objects so MQ connectivity can work – Queue manager – SYSTEM.DEFAULT.LOCAL.QUEUE – SYSTEM.DEFAULT.MODEL.QUEUE – SYSTEM.ADMIN.COMMAND.QUEUE – SYSTEM.IMA.* dynamic queues • Grant authorization to the objects needed by the destination mapping rules – Define a TOPIC object and grant authority to it, or – Define a QUEUE and grant authority to it 16
  17. 17. High availability For IBM MessageSight MQ connectivity works just the same on a single appliance or a high-availability pair of appliances • All configuration and in-flight message information is replicated automatically For IBM MQ IBM MessageSight can connect to multi-instance queue managers or queue managers in HA clusters • Comma-separated connection name is supported by queue manager connections 17
  18. 18. Performance considerations IBM MessageSight is fast, very fast • Most other middleware simply cannot keep up • At millions of messages a second, you need very fast applications • For highest throughput, connect the applications directly to MessageSight When using MessageSight with MQ, you need to make sure MQ can cope with the message rate • Use multiple queue manager connections when message rates are higher • To cope with fluctuations in message rate, the number of messages buffered for transmission to MQ might occasionally get high Carefully choose the scenario you want to perform • Send from MQ to MessageSight to fan messages out to numerous devices • Connect large numbers of devices to MessageSight and then send to MQ • Send a subset of messages from MessageSight to MQ 18
  19. 19. Connecting to IBM Integration Bus
  20. 20. Connecting to IBM Integration Bus Two new patterns for integrating IBM MessageSight with back- end systems • Patterns encapsulate integration behavior for quick time-to-value Alternatively, you can use JMS or MQTT nodes • More skills required, but more flexible 20
  21. 21. Inbound Event Filter Pattern MessageSight routes events into Integration Bus via JMS It narrows down events using a filter and sends to the back-end 21 Many connected devices
  22. 22. Outbound Event Notification Pattern Integration Bus receives events from a back-end system MessageSight receives them using JMS and fans out to devices 22 Many connected devices
  23. 23. Connecting using JMS and MQTT nodes JMS • IBM MessageSight is used just like any other JMS provider • Download and install the MessageSight JMS client JAR • Use the regular JMS nodes: JMSInput, JMSOutput, JMSReply, … MQTT • MQTT Client Connector for IBM Integration Bus is on GitHub: – https://github.com/ot4i/mqtt-client-connector • Built on Paho Java client • MqttPublish and MqttSubscribe nodes • Still under active development JMS is more mature, MQTT is a little faster 23
  24. 24. Connecting to Application Servers
  25. 25. JCA Resource Adapter IBM MessageSight v1.1 introduced a Resource Adapter • Comes as part of the IBM MessageSight Client Pack • Supported in WebSphere Application Server v8.0 or later Outbound communication • An application starts a connection to IBM MessageSight, and then sends JMS messages to JMS destinations, and received JMS messages from JMS destinations in a synchronous manner Inbound communication • JMS messages arriving at a JMS destination are delivered to a message-driven bean (MDB), which processes the messages asynchronously 25
  26. 26. Configuring for outbound communication Use J2C connection factories and administered destinations • Resources > Resource Adapters > J2C connection factories Properties: • clientId – required to use non-shared durable subscriptions • protocol – tcp or tcps • server/port – connection information for the server • transactionSupportLevel – XA, local or no transaction Also the connection pool settings have a big impact on performance http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/wasinfo/v8r5/index.jsp?topic=/com.ibm.webspher e.nd.multiplatform.doc/ae/udat_conpoolset.html 26
  27. 27. Configuration for inbound communication JMS messages received by Message-Driven Beans Use J2C activation specification • Resources > Resource Adapters > J2C activation specifications Properties: • clientId – required to use non-shared durable subscriptions • destination/destinationType – queue or topic name • maxDeliveryFailures – # of failures before endpoint paused • protocol – tcp or tcps • server/port – connection information for the server 27
  28. 28. Configuration for sharing and concurrency With appropriate settings you can get: • Concurrent delivery of messages in a single server • Horizontal scaling of message delivery in a WAS cluster • Workload balancing of messages with a shared subscription Properties: • clientId – required to use non-shared durable subscriptions • clientMessageCache – consumer’s message cache size • concurrentConsumers – max # of consumers per connection • subscriptionDurability – durable or nondurable • subscriptionName – name of the subscription • subscriptionShared – shared or nonshared 28
  29. 29. Scenario 1: Workload balancing in one server? 29 Message-Driven Bean Message-Driven Bean Message-Driven Bean Subscription Subscription Subscription Application Server Each MDB gets its own copy of every message • This isn’t workload balancing
  30. 30. Scenario 1: Workload balancing in one server! 30 Message-Driven Bean Message-Driven Bean Message-Driven Bean Shared Subscription Application Server Use a shared subscription to attach multiple consumers to the same subscription subscriptionShared = “shared” subscriptionName = “mySub” concurrentConsumers = n
  31. 31. Scenario 2: Workload balancing in a cluster 31 Shared Subscription Message-Driven Bean Message-Driven Bean Message-Driven Bean Application Server Application Server Application Server Define activation specification at cluster scope Do not set ClientID Can have >1 MDB per server
  32. 32. Scenario 3: Message delivery with high availability 32 Message-Driven Bean Message-Driven Bean Message-Driven Bean Shared Subscription Application Server Give server information for primary and standby in configuration Connection will switch when MessageSight fails over server = primaryIP,standbyIP port = n subscriptionDurability = durable Standby Primary
  33. 33. Connecting to IBM InfoSphere Streams
  34. 34. Big data meets big connectivity 34 Smarter Decisions Powerful analytics IBM MessageSight IBM InfoSphere Streams Smarter actionsReal-time data Internet Scale device connectivity
  35. 35. Use case: Real-time analytics 35 car/1 car/2 car/<ID> IBM InfoSphere Streams (decisioning, analytics) car/<ID> alert/car/<ID> Control Center app Driver app(s) … {lat, lon, heading, speed, airbag, wipers} car/# event/# cars alert/car/<ID> Connected Cars IBM MessageSight Emergency Services IBM Worklight publish subscribe MQTT
  36. 36. Connecting to IBM InfoSphere Streams InfoSphere Streams V3.2 introduced support for MQTT Messaging Toolkit includes 2 MQTT operators: • MQTTSink – Publishes messages to an MQTT server – Creates a message for every tuple it receives on its input port – Either configured topic name, or take it from the input tuple • MQTTSource – Subscribes to topics and receives messages from an MQTT server – Can specify list of topics and QoS for multiple subscriptions – Message format can be “bin” (->parsed) or “block” (->blob) Recommend using V3.2.1
  37. 37. Questions?
  38. 38. Come and hear about MessageSight at Impact 2014 Monday 4:00-5:00 PM IOT-1899 Introduction to IBM MessageSight Palazzo F Tuesday 10:30-11:30 AM AMC-3134 Meet the Experts: IBM MessageSight San Polo 3501 B Tuesday 2:15-3:15 PM IOT-1900 Connecting IBM MessageSight to the Enterprise Palazzo F Wednesday 10:30-11:30 AM MMA-1921 Hands-on Lab Building an Event- driven Mobile Application with IBM Worklight & IBM MessageSight Murano 3301 B Wednesday 1:00-3:15 PM IOT-1920 Hands-on Lab IBM MessageSight & Internet of Things Cloud Murano 3305 Thursday 2:15-3:15 PM IOT-1912 Amaze Customers with Dynamic, Event- driven Mobile Applications using WebSockets and Other Protocols Marcello 4405 38
  39. 39. We Value Your Feedback Don’t forget to submit your Impact session and speaker feedback! Your feedback is very important to us – we use it to continually improve the conference. Use the Conference Mobile App or the online Agenda Builder to quickly submit your survey • Navigate to “Surveys” to see a view of surveys for sessions you’ve attended 39
  40. 40. Thank You
  41. 41. Legal Disclaimer • © IBM Corporation 2014. All Rights Reserved. • The information contained in this publication is provided for informational purposes only. While efforts were made to verify the completeness and accuracy of the information contained in this publication, it is provided AS IS without warranty of any kind, express or implied. In addition, this information is based on IBM’s current product plans and strategy, which are subject to change by IBM without notice. IBM shall not be responsible for any damages arising out of the use of, or otherwise related to, this publication or any other materials. Nothing contained in this publication is intended to, nor shall have the effect of, creating any warranties or representations from IBM or its suppliers or licensors, or altering the terms and conditions of the applicable license agreement governing the use of IBM software. • References in this presentation to IBM products, programs, or services do not imply that they will be available in all countries in which IBM operates. Product release dates and/or capabilities referenced in this presentation may change at any time at IBM’s sole discretion based on market opportunities or other factors, and are not intended to be a commitment to future product or feature availability in any way. Nothing contained in these materials is intended to, nor shall have the effect of, stating or implying that any activities undertaken by you will result in any specific sales, revenue growth or other results. • If the text contains performance statistics or references to benchmarks, insert the following language; otherwise delete: Performance is based on measurements and projections using standard IBM benchmarks in a controlled environment. The actual throughput or performance that any user will experience will vary depending upon many factors, including considerations such as the amount of multiprogramming in the user's job stream, the I/O configuration, the storage configuration, and the workload processed. Therefore, no assurance can be given that an individual user will achieve results similar to those stated here. • If the text includes any customer examples, please confirm we have prior written approval from such customer and insert the following language; otherwise delete: All customer examples described are presented as illustrations of how those customers have used IBM products and the results they may have achieved. Actual environmental costs and performance characteristics may vary by customer. • Please review text for proper trademark attribution of IBM products. At first use, each product name must be the full name and include appropriate trademark symbols (e.g., IBM Lotus® Sametime® Unyte™). Subsequent references can drop “IBM” but should include the proper branding (e.g., Lotus Sametime Gateway, or WebSphere Application Server). Please refer to http://www.ibm.com/legal/copytrade.shtml for guidance on which trademarks require the ® or ™ symbol. Do not use abbreviations for IBM product names in your presentation. All product names must be used as adjectives rather than nouns. Please list all of the trademarks that you use in your presentation as follows; delete any not included in your presentation. IBM, the IBM logo, Lotus, Lotus Notes, Notes, Domino, Quickr, Sametime, WebSphere, UC2, PartnerWorld and Lotusphere are trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both. Unyte is a trademark of WebDialogs, Inc., in the United States, other countries, or both. • If you reference Adobe® in the text, please mark the first use and include the following; otherwise delete: Adobe, the Adobe logo, PostScript, and the PostScript logo are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the United States, and/or other countries. • If you reference Java™ in the text, please mark the first use and include the following; otherwise delete: Java and all Java-based trademarks are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. in the United States, other countries, or both. • If you reference Microsoft® and/or Windows® in the text, please mark the first use and include the following, as applicable; otherwise delete: Microsoft and Windows are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both. • If you reference Intel® and/or any of the following Intel products in the text, please mark the first use and include those that you use as follows; otherwise delete: Intel, Intel Centrino, Celeron, Intel Xeon, Intel SpeedStep, Itanium, and Pentium are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States and other countries. • If you reference UNIX® in the text, please mark the first use and include the following; otherwise delete: UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group in the United States and other countries. • If you reference Linux® in your presentation, please mark the first use and include the following; otherwise delete: Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds in the United States, other countries, or both. Other company, product, or service names may be trademarks or service marks of others. • If the text/graphics include screenshots, no actual IBM employee names may be used (even your own), if your screenshots include fictitious company names (e.g., Renovations, Zeta Bank, Acme) please update and insert the following; otherwise delete: All references to [insert fictitious company name] refer to a fictitious company and are used for illustration purposes only.
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