Reengaging Disconnected Youth through Youth Development
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Reengaging Disconnected Youth through Youth Development

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  • NLC-IYEF Disconnected Youth 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore
  • NLC-IYEF Disconnected Youth 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore
  • NLC-IYEF Disconnected Youth 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore
  • NLC-IYEF Disconnected Youth 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore
  • NLC-IYEF Disconnected Youth 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore
  • NLC-IYEF Disconnected Youth 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore
  • NLC-IYEF Disconnected Youth 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore Helps municipal leaders take action on behalf of children, youth, and families in their communities Leaders held accountable even if not responsible! Emphasis: Learning networks, technical assistance Program areas in education and afterschool, safety of children and youth, family economic success, youth development City Platform for Strengthening Families
  • NLC-YEF Institute, Municipal Leadership for High School Options & Alternatives 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore
  • Action kits offer a menu of practical steps that officials can take to address key problems or challenges. These kits feature a wide-ranging menu of opportunities for municipal leadership based on the latest research and best practices from across the nation. As of June 2005, there were seven kits available: Reengaging Disconnected Youth Supporting Early Childhood Success Improving Public Schools  Expanding Afterschool Opportunities Promoting Youth Participation Helping Working Families Protecting Children and Youth
  • Purpose: Promote city leadership and action Bring mayors around a common agenda Build on innovation and progress made in recent years on behalf of children, youth, and families Ex. College access initiatives, universal pre-K and afterschool, access to financial mainstream Mayors holding themselves accountable for meeting measurable goals Call on new Administration and Congress to join mayors in prioritizing investment in children and families
  • NLC-IYEF Disconnected Youth 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore
  • NLC-IYEF Disconnected Youth 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore
  • NLC-IYEF Disconnected Youth 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore
  • NLC-YEF Institute, Municipal Leadership for High School Options & Alternatives 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore
  • NLC-IYEF Disconnected Youth 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore
  • NLC-IYEF Disconnected Youth 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore
  • NLC-IYEF Disconnected Youth 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore
  • NLC-YEF Institute, Municipal Leadership for High School Options & Alternatives 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore
  • NLC-YEF Institute, Municipal Leadership for High School Options & Alternatives 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore
  • NLC-YEF Institute, Municipal Leadership for High School Options & Alternatives 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore
  • NLC-YEF Institute, Municipal Leadership for High School Options & Alternatives 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore
  • NLC-YEF Institute, Municipal Leadership for High School Options & Alternatives 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore
  • NLC-IYEF Disconnected Youth 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore Note that this is not among the case study sites Could add in mention of SAMHSA as source
  • NLC-IYEF Disconnected Youth 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore 5 Cs and a P
  • NLC-IYEF Disconnected Youth 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore
  • NLC-IYEF Disconnected Youth 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore
  • NLC-IYEF Disconnected Youth 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore
  • NLC-IYEF Disconnected Youth 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore
  • NLC-IYEF Disconnected Youth 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore
  • NLC-IYEF Disconnected Youth 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore
  • NLC-YEF Institute, Municipal Leadership for High School Options & Alternatives 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore
  • NLC-IYEF Disconnected Youth 10/16/09 Andrew O. Moore

Reengaging Disconnected Youth through Youth Development Reengaging Disconnected Youth through Youth Development Presentation Transcript

  • Strengthening Communities by Reengaging Disconnected Youth Through Youth Development “ Embrace the Challenge” 39 th Annual Conference Association of New York State Youth Bureaus October 6, 2009 National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families Municipal Network on Disconnected Youth
  • Topics for discussion
    • Background…and Test Questions!
    • Scale of key challenges
    • Applying a youth development perspective
    • Recent findings – municipal leadership to reengage dropouts and disconnected youth
    • Questions and answers
    National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families Municipal Network on Disconnected Youth
  • Terminology 1: What is “cross-system collaboration”?
    • Being able to conspire openly with your competitors.
    • Putting the money on the table, and taking your hands off.
    • To do more with LE$$ .
    • Teaching grown people to share.
    • Col labor ation.
    National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families Municipal Network on Disconnected Youth
  • Terminology 2: What term describes an older youth who lacks strong ties to school, work, caring adults, and the community? National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families Municipal Network on Disconnected Youth
      • Disconnected
      • Vulnerable
      • Having a difficult transition to adulthood
      • Out-of-school youth / dropout
      • All of the above / depends on time, place
  • Terminology 3: “Disconnected youth”
    • What percentage of youth in the U.S., ages 16-24, are currently neither in school nor working?
          • A. 1 in 6
          • B. 1 in 8
          • C. 1 in 10
          • D. 1 in 12
    National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families Municipal Network on Disconnected Youth
  • Terminology 4: What are “Multiple Pathways?”
    • Routes to Holiday Inn from NYS Thruway
    • A way of combining career and academic tracks through high school, bridging into college
    • Range of ways to attain high school diploma and prepare for further training or education – esp. for young people who have fallen behind in credits
    National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families Municipal Network on Disconnected Youth
  • National League of Cities & Institute for Youth, Education & Families
    • National association of 16,000 cities and towns
    • New York State Conference of Mayors and Municipal Officials = state affiliate
    • Institute for Youth, Education & Families (YEF)
      • Helping municipal leaders take action on behalf of the children, youth and families in their communities
      • Early childhood, family economic success, education and afterschool, safety, youth development
    National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families Municipal Network on Disconnected Youth
  • How the YEF Institute Supports Cities
    • Technical Assistance – usually, small groups of cities
    • Current: Reengaging Disconnected Youth Through Economic Recovery Efforts – 12 cities
    • Bank on Cities Campaign – 8 cities
    • Eight Peer Learning Networks
    • Mayors’ Education Advisors, Early Care, Afterschool…
    • National Summit on Your City’s Families
    • October 11-13, 2009 Boston
  • Action Kits – and other products on promising practices
    • Supporting Early Childhood Success
    • Improving Public Schools 
    • Expanding Afterschool Opportunities
    • Promoting Youth Participation
    • Helping Working Families
    • Protecting Children and Youth
    • Reengaging Disconnected Youth
    • AND
    • Lessons Learned reports
    • Strategy guides
    • E-Newsletters
    National League of Cities, Institute for Youth, Education, and Families
    • Calls on mayors from across the nation to set at least one bold, measurable goal for children in four areas:
    • Opportunities to learn and grow; a safe neighborhood to call home; a healthy lifestyle and environment; and a financially fit family.
      • Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter:  Cut the city’s dropout rate in half in five to seven years and double the college degree attainment rate in five to 10 years.
      • Charleston, S.C., Mayor Joseph P. Riley Jr.: Expand by 25 percent the number of community learning centers and out-of-school time programs serving elementary school children.
    • More than 100 mayors have signed on to date – including Mayor Bloomberg & Mayor Jennings
            • www.mayors4kids.org
  • Scaling our challenge 1: Scant youth employment
    • < 30% teens working in June 2009
    • Lowest level in 61 years
    • Half what it was in 1978
    • Consistent downward trend
    • Even lower rates for young men of color
    • Source: Northeastern University Center for Labor Market Studies
    National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families Municipal Network on Disconnected Youth
  • Scaling our challenge 2) Low HS Completion Rates
        • Three out of every ten students do not graduate from high school – a total of one million per year, nationwide.
        • “ Coin toss:” 52% of youth graduate from high school in main school systems of 50 largest cities; stark urban-suburban differences.
    Source: Alliance for Excellent Education Graphics Source: Alliance for Excellent Education
  • How these combine: One in six older youth disconnected
    •  Four million between 16 -24 neither in school nor employed; 20% of age group in some cities
      • Recent Schuyler Center analysis calculated 200,000 disconnected young adults in NY State
    • 20,000 per year leave foster care
    • 200,000 per year leave correctional facilities
    • Overlaps: teen parents, homeless, runaways
    National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families Municipal Network on Disconnected Youth
  • Scaling our challenge 3: The next (postsecondary) frontier
    • About one-third of high school graduates are not college- and work-ready
    • Half of entering students in many community colleges must take (non-credit) remedial classes
    • Two-year schools’ completion rate = 40% within six years
    National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families Municipal Network on Disconnected Youth
  • Economic Impact on the Individual 2005 Average Income by Educational Attainment (2006 Census Data as depicted by Alliance for Excellent Education)
  • Long term impact of those lower average earnings - example National League of Cities, Institute for Youth, Education, and Families Lifetime earnings of 18-65 year olds for high school graduates and dropouts in the state of Massachusetts (in $1,000) No diploma or GED High school graduate or GED holder Difference in lifetime earnings All Men Women $729 $954 $490 $1,075 $1,398 $755 $346 $444 $265
  • Louisville pipeline illustration National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families
  • Despite glum statistics, we also know “good news” about young adults
    • Capacity for hard work
    • Learn quickly
    • Idealistic, relate well to team structure
    • Resilient – can attach to adults, develop a skill, remain optimistic
    • Examples -- since 1994, 40,000 YouthBuild students produced more than 12,000 units of low-income housing nationwide
    National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families Municipal Network on Disconnected Youth
  • Every reason to tackle challenges via a youth development approach
    • “ Problem-free is not fully prepared”
    • Broad strategic goals – promote educational attainment, develop workforce connections, support youth through transition
    • Schuyler Center adds, rely on programs that are youth-, knowledge, and care-centered.
    • Or borrow BUIC from Boys & Girls Clubs: Belonging, Usefulness, Influence, Competence
    National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families Municipal Network on Disconnected Youth
  • And two more key assumptions…
    • No one agency or system can do it all...cities (and youth bureaus) rarely in the lead on all aspects...thus, cross-system collaboration required!
    National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families Municipal Network on Disconnected Youth
  • Getting started on dropouts: How municipal leaders can promote high school completion
    • Use the bully pulpit to highlight dropout rates, engage public
    • Use leadership roles to highlight school & student success
    • Convene school, college and university leaders
    • Implement or update city policies and programs – zoning, building space, etc.
    • Promote and ensure resources to support options – especially wraparound services
    Source: Setting the Stage for New High Schools: Municipal Leadership in Supporting High School Alternatives, NLC-YEF Institute, 2007
  • To tackle the dropout issue fully, every city needs to put in place…
    • Early warning systems
    • Efforts to transform struggling high schools
    • Integration of education & other data systems
    • Means to reflect, re-tool, innovate across systems
    • Means to engage parents and stakeholders, to set high common aspirations – prepared for college, career, life
    • Flexible portfolio of quality options offering rigor, relevance, relationships, and future focus
    National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families
  • Flexible portfolio = Multiple pathways to graduation
    • A range of choices to meet the needs and learning styles of a range of students
    • Analogous to comprehensive afterschool offerings
    • Overage/undercredited
    • CTE and Tech Prep
    • Dual enrollment
    • Dropout recovery
    • Career pathways and academies
    • Work-learning
    National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families
  • NYC Multiple Pathways Portfolio: School and Program Descriptions Source: NYC Department of Education Young Adult Borough Centers Supportive learning environments designed for students who have been in high school for at least four years and have attained a minimum of 17 credits, operated through a collaborative partnership between the DOE and a community-based organization, which provides services to students, including youth development support, career and college counseling, and assistance with job placement. Transfer Schools Small, academically rigorous, full-time high schools for students who have been enrolled in high school for at least one year and are far from promoting on grade level. Blended GED Programs Prepare students for the GED and support them in developing meaningful post-secondary connections .   Learning to Work Helps students stay engaged in school by developing the skills they need to complete high school, gain employment, and succeed in post-secondary education, via services provided by CBO partners and integrated across Multiple Pathways schools and programs, including Transfer Schools, GED programs, and YABCs .
  • An entry point for Youth Bureaus: Full-service community schools
    • A place, and a set of partnerships
    • Integrated focus on academics, health, and social services, and youth development
    • Toward common results – ready to learn; high standards; well prepared for adult roles; safe, supportive families and neighborhoods
    • Community development aspect -- schools as hubs for strengthening neighborhoods
    National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families
  • Build out a citywide analysis and plan
    • Boston
    • Youth Transitions Task Force
    • “ Too Big To Be Seen” report
    • Social and fiscal consequences
    • Spurred additional research, legislation
    • Philadelphia
    • “ Unfulfilled Promise” report
    • Project U-Turn
    • District multiple pathways office, strategy
    • RFP to identify new providers, models
    National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families
  • Getting started with re-engaging disconnected youth: case studies of cross-system collaboration
    • Evanston, Wyoming , pop. 12,000. H igh rates of teen suicide, substance abuse: Youth Drug & Alcohol Court + OST programs 6-12 grade
    • San Francisco, Calif. , pop. 600,000. High rates of youth homelessness: Transition Age Youth Task Force & recommendations; programs for former foster youth.
    • Philadelphia, PA , pop. 1.5 million. Multiple issues facing large disconnected youth population; foster youth one-stop + work for returning JJ youth.
    • Albany, NY, pop., 100,000. High truancy rates, gangs: WIA Service Navigation system + Truancy Abatement Program/Center
    National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families Municipal Network on Disconnected Youth
  • Case Study Findings 1: Municipal leaders’ roles – 5 Cs and a P
    • Conceptualizing – vision
    • Convening
    • Commissioning – research, intermediaries
    • Cross-walking – with counties, school districts, foundations, businesses
    • Co-financing – federal, state, and local $$
    • Promoting
    National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families Municipal Network on Disconnected Youth
  • Motivating themes for leaders
    • Public safety – perceived or actual
    • Equity – a second (or third) chance for all
    • “ These are our kids”
    • Strong families, workforce, citizenry
    • Efficiency – 1) Invest now, save later
    • 2) Extend current reach
    • Livability
    National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families Municipal Network on Disconnected Youth
  • Case Study Findings 2: Why Cross-system collaboration as a key strategy
    • Volume of need
    • Complexity – We can’t do it alone
    • Combining resources – human, financial
    • Multiple agencies working with a youth or family anyway
    • Produces better results for young people and communities
    National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families Municipal Network on Disconnected Youth
  • Case Study Findings 3: Intermediary roles and notes
    • Roles
      • Convening and coordinating
      • Institutional knowledge
      • Keep focus on systems and sustainability
    • Esp. important -- more than two systems
    • May build upon existing group or structure
    • Examples in San Diego, San Jose, Boston
    National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families Municipal Network on Disconnected Youth
  • Case Study Findings 4: Shared accountability and data
    • San Diego - Regional Risk/Resiliency Tool
    • Boston - Renewed multi-agency focus on “hot spots” identified through mapping and case file sharing
    • Philadelphia – “data warehouse” – school district and city agencies together
    National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families Municipal Network on Disconnected Youth
  • Results of successful cross-system collaboration for DY…
    • Common points of entry, intake, assessment
    • Common case management
    • Transition / aftercare planning
    • Outreach / new capacity
    • Financial sustainability / leveraging local funds
    • Expanded range of high school alternatives
    National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families Municipal Network on Disconnected Youth
  • Options for Youth Bureaus to pursue
    • Present information on high school completion and youth employment rates to city and school district leaders
    • Identify a common project on which city and county “systems” can work together for older youth
    • Ask the Mayor to sign on to the Mayors’ Action Challenge; you suggest concrete local goals
    • Create a platform for the mayor to speak out on the need to re-engage older disconnected youth
    • Commit to one action for DY
    National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families Municipal Network on Disconnected Youth
  • Stimulus funding opportunities for Multiple Pathways / Reengaging DY
    • $1.2 billion School Improvement Grants
    • $650 million “Investing in What Works and Innovation” Fund – district-nonprofit partners
    • $25.2 billion in bonding authority for states and districts to issue facility renovation bonds
    • $50 million in additional YouthBuild grants
    • $1.2 billion in Workforce Investment Act funding for youth
    National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families
  • Contact information National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families Municipal Network on Disconnected Youth Andrew O. Moore Senior Fellow, National League of Cities’ Institute for Youth, Education, and Families 1301 Pennsylvania Avenue NW Washington, DC 20004 Phone: 215.848.6910 E-mail: moore@nlc.org