Sxsw 2011 interactive_narratives_creating_the_future_of_storytelling
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Sxsw 2011 interactive_narratives_creating_the_future_of_storytelling

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Presentation about Interactive Narratives I delivered with a team of three other people at SXSW 2011.

Presentation about Interactive Narratives I delivered with a team of three other people at SXSW 2011.

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    Sxsw 2011 interactive_narratives_creating_the_future_of_storytelling Sxsw 2011 interactive_narratives_creating_the_future_of_storytelling Presentation Transcript

    • Interactive Narratives:
      Creating the Future Of Storytelling
      SXSW Interactive | March 14, 2011
    • Contents
      Introduction: Defining and Creating an Interactive Narrative…………..4
      Andrew Lewellen – Content Strategist, Razorfish
      “The Three Little Pigs”: Authoring an iPadApp…………………………10
      Josh Koppel – Founder, ScrollMotion
      The Role of Social Media in Interactive Storytelling……………………28
      Esther Lim - Founder, The Estuary, LLC
      Participation: Why, What & How…….……………………………………38
      Robert Pratten – CEO, TransmediaStoryteller.com
      Summary…….………………………………………………………………56
    • Introduction:
      Defining and Creating an Interactive Narrative
      Andrew Lewellen
      Content Strategist, Razorfish
    • What Is An Interactive Narrative?
      Page 4Developedby: Andrew Lewellen, Razorfish
    • What Is An Interactive Narrative?
      An Interactive Narrative
      • Has an authored core story
      • This could be a mobile app, a print book, a web site. Or nothing more than a sheet of paper with a Central Dramatic Question, story arc, plot, and character sketches.
      Page 5Developedby: Andrew Lewellen, Razorfish
    • What Is An Interactive Narrative?
      An Interactive Narrative
      • Has an authored core story
      • This could be a mobile app, a print book, a web site. Or nothing more than a sheet of paper with a Central Dramatic Question, story arc, plot, and character sketches.
      • Has a social narrative
      • The lives of the characters expand into a shared social space where the audience can learn more about them and become more engaged with the story.
      Page 6Developedby: Andrew Lewellen, Razorfish
    • What Is An Interactive Narrative?
      An Interactive Narrative
      • Has an authored core story
      • This could be a mobile app, a print book, a web site. Or nothing more than a sheet of paper with a Central Dramatic Question, story arc, plot, and character sketches.
      • Has a social narrative
      • The lives of the characters expand into a shared social space where the audience can learn more about them and become more engaged with the story.
      • Integrates and encourages audience participation
      • The plot moves outside of the core story and utilizes a social dialogue to engage readers with the story and its outcome.
      Page 7Developedby: Andrew Lewellen, Razorfish
    • What Is An Interactive Narrative?
      A dynamic story that allows for personalized engagement and narrows the gap between writer and reader.
      Page 8Developedby: Andrew Lewellen, Razorfish
    • “The Three Little Pigs”
      Authoring an iPad App
      Josh Koppel
      Founder, ScrollMotion
    • The Original Experience
      Page 10Developedby: Josh Koppel, ScrollMotion
    • Page 11Developedby: Josh Koppel, ScrollMotion
    • Page 12Developedby: Josh Koppel, ScrollMotion
    • Page 13Developedby: Josh Koppel, ScrollMotion
    • Page 14Developedby: Josh Koppel, ScrollMotion
    • Page 15Developedby: Josh Koppel, ScrollMotion
    • Page 16Developedby: Josh Koppel, ScrollMotion
    • Page 17Developedby: Josh Koppel, ScrollMotion
    • Revising the Story Assets
      • Digital book building turns pages into pixels
      Page 18Developedby: Josh Koppel, ScrollMotion
    • Step 1: Asset Assessment
      Image Characteristics
      • 18 Jpegs
      • 450 x 420
      • Vertical Orientation
      • Public Domain Content
      Page 19Developedby: Josh Koppel, ScrollMotion
    • Step 1: Asset Assessment
      Text Characteristics
      • 18 Pages
      • One paragraph per page
      Audio Characteristics
      • 18 Individual Files (Page by Page)
      • MP3 Files
      Page 20Developedby: Josh Koppel, ScrollMotion
    • Step 2: Visual Layout
      Page 21Developedby: Josh Koppel, ScrollMotion
    • Step 2: Visual Layout
      Page 22Developedby: Josh Koppel, ScrollMotion
    • Step 2: Visual Layout
      Page 23Developedby: Josh Koppel, ScrollMotion
    • Step 2: Visual Layout
      Page 24Developedby: Josh Koppel, ScrollMotion
    • Step 2: Visual Layout
      Page 25Developedby: Josh Koppel, ScrollMotion
    • Step 3:
      Extra Features Encourage Personalized Engagement
      • Play Modules
      • Record Your Own Audio
      Page 26Developedby: Josh Koppel, ScrollMotion
    • The Role of Social Media
      in Interactive Storytelling
      Esther Lim
      Founder, The Estuary, LLC
    • The Role of Social Media in Interactive Storytelling
      Esther Lim
      Founder, The Estuary, LLC
    • Social Media as a narrative/engagement platform
      Summary
      Social Media is a content layering tool to provide extra content to fans
      When used as an alternate narrative platform, Social Media can:
      • Enrichthe primary story through greater character/scenario details
      • Extend the primary story through exploration of additional standalone yet related story universes
      • Engage audiences by bringing the fictional world into the real world through social interaction, shared experiences and co-authorship
      Page 29Developed by: The Estuary, LLC
    • How do you use social media as a narrative platform?
      Character/Scene development with social profiles/blogs
      • Illustrate the character’s socialgraph (friends, interests, interactions)
      • Use status updates and photos to deepen the plot or introduce sub plots/back stories
      • Use threads to introduce secondary characters, augment character dialogue
      • Use blogs to shift story perspective, highlight internal dialogue
      Page 30Developed by: The Estuary, LLC
    • How do you use social media as a narrative platform?
      Character/Scene development with social profiles/blogs
      • Use blogs to shift story perspective, highlight internal dialogue
      Page 31Developed by: The Estuary, LLC
    • How do you use social media as a narrative platform?
      Activate audience participation
      • Use micro blogs like Twitter or Tumblr to capture real time events unfolding and tweet call to actions
      • Use social mobile media to drive readers to specific locations for more content discovery
      Page 32Developed by: The Estuary, LLC
    • Benefits of using social media in your narrative
      Audience Connection and Engagement
      • Emotional Connection: Audiences can form “friendships” with the character
      Page 33Developed by: The Estuary, LLC
    • Benefits of using social media in your narrative
      Audience Connection and Engagement
      • Emotional Connection: Audiences can form “friendships” with the character
      • Community Building: Friendships and community forms around shared experiences
      Page 34Developed by: The Estuary, LLC
    • Benefits of using social media in your narrative
      Audience Connection and Engagement
      • Emotional Connection: Audiences can form “friendships” with the character
      • Community Building: Friendships and community forms around shared experiences
      • Engagement/Co-Authorship: Opportunity for readers to share ideas about the story that can later be integrated into future story development
      Page 35Developed by: The Estuary, LLC
    • Benefits of using social media in your narrative
      Marketing and Promotion
      • Story Awareness and Discovery: Bring your story to where people play online
      • Content syndication/sharing: Good stories create social cache and are shared across friend/fan networks
      • Improves search engine discoverability: More mentions, hyperlinks, tags and discussions drives better search engine visibility
      • Audience acquisition: Multiple storytelling platforms create more entry points for entering and engaging with the story and its community of readers
      Page 36Developed by: The Estuary, LLC
    • Getting started with social media narrative
      How do I know if social media is right for my story?
      Understand your audience and how they consume content
      Design the level of reader participation you want to build
      Identify the best social media platforms for your story/character
      Build natural entry points (“rabbit holes”) in the story that lead to alternate supporting narratives
      Leverage platform features to augment story experience
      Write the experience for all three tiers of content consumers:
      • Passive Consumer
      • Occasional Participant/Lurker
      • Die Hard Fan
      Allow enough ramp up time (4-6 weeks) for character integration into a community. Relationships are not built overnight.
      Page 37Developed by: The Estuary, LLC
    • Esther LimFounder, The Estuary, LLC
      esther@theestuarysf.com
      www.theestuarysf.com
      @geekgrl or @theestuarysf
      Page 38Developed by: The Estuary, LLC
    • Participation: Why, What & How
      Robert Pratten
      CEO, Transmedia Storyteller.com
    • Summary
      Leave a door open
      Good stories work with or without interactivity
      Build on what you know
      Structure for enthusiasm
      Page 40Developedby: Robert Pratten, TransmediaStoryteller.com
    • Why bother with participation?
      The business case
      lower costs
      marketing is integrated into the product (as it should be)
      increased sales
      social recommendation & spread
      empowerment of advocates
      engagement is measurable
      The creative case
      audience interaction is thrilling and addictive
      Page 41Developedby: Robert Pratten, TransmediaStoryteller.com
    • How do I do it?
      Objective:
      Make it easy
      Make it worthwhile, meaningful, fun
      Steps
      Sketch the experience you want to create (consider artistic and commercial scenarios)
      Layer your story for different levels of enthusiasm such that it works for the lazy and rewards the fan
      Page 42Developedby: Robert Pratten, TransmediaStoryteller.com
    • Make it easy
      Page 43Developedby: Robert Pratten, TransmediaStoryteller.com
    • Incentivize participation
      Page 44Developedby: Robert Pratten, TransmediaStoryteller.com
    • Layering your story
      Page 45Developedby: Robert Pratten, TransmediaStoryteller.com
    • Additional content for fans
      Page 46Developedby: Robert Pratten, TransmediaStoryteller.com
    • Content for attraction
      Page 47Developedby: Robert Pratten, TransmediaStoryteller.com
    • Layers united by story
      Page 48Developedby: Robert Pratten, TransmediaStoryteller.com
    • Examples
      Lowlifes.tv
      solo participation
      QR codes offer additional subplot
      email-based (alternative reality) game
      Horror Unlimited short story
      play with friends
      two-player twitter game
      3 Interactive Pigs
      play in teams
      multiplayer interactive storytelling
      Page 49Developedby: Robert Pratten, TransmediaStoryteller.com
    • 3 Interactive Pigs
      Strong authorship (story is on rails) but…
      Audience decides outcome at plot points
      House of Straw, House of Sticks, House of Bricks
      Pigs vs Wolf – you decide!
      Do the pigs live or die?
      Why bother?
      Fun to create and fun to play
      Facilitate social play which
      strengthens relationships
      raise awareness of other (paid) media
      Reward fans
      Page 50Developedby: Robert Pratten, TransmediaStoryteller.com
    • 3 Interactive Pigs in Layers
      Page 51Developedby: Robert Pratten, TransmediaStoryteller.com
    • Call To Action
      Page 52Developedby: Robert Pratten, TransmediaStoryteller.com
    • Layered Engagement
      Page 53Developedby: Robert Pratten, TransmediaStoryteller.com
    • Poking friends
      Matchword used to trigger Conducttr - tells @BigBadWolf_2011 to send a tweet to these friends
      Page 54Developedby: Robert Pratten, TransmediaStoryteller.com
    • Summary
      Leave a door open
      Good stories work with or without interactivity
      Build on what you know
      Structure for enthusiasm
      Lower costs
      Increased sales
      Page 55Developedby: Robert Pratten, TransmediaStoryteller.com
    • Start writing for audience engagement: www.tstoryteller.com
      Robert PrattenCEO TransmediaStoryteller.com
      @zenfilms or @tstoryteller
    • Summary
    • Summary
      An Interactive Narrative
      • Has an authored core story.
      • Has a social narrative.
      • Integrates and encourages audience participation.
      • Is a dynamic story that allows for personalized engagement and narrows the gap between writer and reader.
      Page 58Developedby: Andrew Lewellen, Razorfish
    • Questions?
      Page 59
    • Thank You!