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Presentation 24 October 2012 to School of Civil and Building Engineering, Loughborough University
 

Presentation 24 October 2012 to School of Civil and Building Engineering, Loughborough University

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Interview presentation 24th October 2012

Interview presentation 24th October 2012

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  • Andrea Wheeler [email_address] [Slide 2] TO OUTLINE: To outline the presentation (which will be about 15 minutes long to give some time for questions) I will discuss (a) why there is a need now to include children in post-occupancy evaluations ; (b) in brief, the character of post-occupancy evaluation methods have been used in schools and with children and why (the paper for the conference proceeding charts this background in more detail) ; (c) why participatory and co-research/co-design methods are used by educational researchers and the perceived and potential benefits and problems of such approaches; (d) our emergent approach – why we used a participative method and why we are working in this way with children (and how this differs from work with adults); (e) Hence, I will show you some some initial observation, and samples of children’s dialogue and drawings [we are not going to show video for ethical reasons however some of the sample of dialogue are taken from videos recording – for reasons that will emerge/become evident]; (f) and finally I’d like to discuss some future directions - connecting qualitative and quantitative - to develop potential recommendations for designers. This presentation is available afterwards if you would like it and I have copies of the paper available to in either printed or electronic form.
  • Andrea Wheeler [email_address] [Slide 2] TO OUTLINE: To outline the presentation (which will be about 15 minutes long to give some time for questions) I will discuss (a) why there is a need now to include children in post-occupancy evaluations ; (b) in brief, the character of post-occupancy evaluation methods have been used in schools and with children and why (the paper for the conference proceeding charts this background in more detail) ; (c) why participatory and co-research/co-design methods are used by educational researchers and the perceived and potential benefits and problems of such approaches; (d) our emergent approach – why we used a participative method and why we are working in this way with children (and how this differs from work with adults); (e) Hence, I will show you some some initial observation, and samples of children’s dialogue and drawings [we are not going to show video for ethical reasons however some of the sample of dialogue are taken from videos recording – for reasons that will emerge/become evident]; (f) and finally I’d like to discuss some future directions - connecting qualitative and quantitative - to develop potential recommendations for designers. This presentation is available afterwards if you would like it and I have copies of the paper available to in either printed or electronic form.
  • Andrea Wheeler Tim Jackson

Presentation 24 October 2012 to School of Civil and Building Engineering, Loughborough University Presentation 24 October 2012 to School of Civil and Building Engineering, Loughborough University Presentation Transcript

  • Lecturer in ArchitectureSchool of Civil and Building EngineeringLoughborough UniversityAndrea WheelerBA(Hons) Dip Arch (Oxford)MPhil (Mech. Eng.) PhD (Architecture)“My past work experience, skills and aspirations of research andteaching in the School”24 October 2012
  • Outline•Qualifications and work experience.•Research experience and academic achievementssuitable to the position of Lecturer in ArchitecturalTechnology.•Teaching and learning aspirations for an academiccareer.
  • Construction materials researcherExploring sustainable construction Retrofit of traditional buildings
  • Academic Background.Prize winning studentBA (Hons) Architecture, Second year prize foroutstanding achievementNational Diploma in Art and Design. Fine Art/ StudioPractice (Distinction)Graduate Diploma in Architecture – Prizes for Graphicsand Dissertation
  • MPhil (Timber EngineeringResearch and StructuralConnection Technology)Certificate Institute of WoodScience (Timber IndustryQualification)TRADA Technology Ltd.,Sponsorship – FULLSCHOLARSHIPHutchinson, Allan and AndreaWheeler (1998) “Resin BondedRepairs to Timber Structures”.International Journal ofAdhesion and Adhesives, 18, 1-13.
  • PhD architectural DESIGN THEORY/ethics in the built environmentthrough contemporary dialoguesThe University of Nottingham –AHRC Full ScholarshipWheeler, Andrea (2008) "Aboutbeing-two in an architecturalperspective". In Conversations,Luce Irigaray (ed.) Continuum. pp.53 – 72Wheeler, Andrea (2008)"Architectural Issues in BuildingCommunity through LuceIrigarays Perspective on being-two". In, Teaching Luce Irigaray(ed.) Continuum. pp. 61- 68
  • Industrial ExperienceArchitects, Engineers, Planning Consultants and PolicyDefra, London (Policy)Walker Troup, ArchitectsShere Consulting Ltd., (Planning)Redmak Architects, NottinghamDerek Latham Architects, DerbyRegeneration East Midlands (Planning)March and Grochowski, Nottingham (Architects)Design Group Cambridge (Architects)Holder and Mathias Alcock, Architects, Cardiff
  • Post Doctoral Research –Success in Research FundingPost doctoral UK Energy Research Council/ESRC , 3year Interdisciplinary Early Careers Fellowship , TheUniversity of Nottingham (£220,000 over 3 years)Universitas 21 lecture seriesUK Energy Research Council “The Meeting Place”OxfordLearning and Teaching Coordinator CEDE (Projectswith Simon Austin an Jacqui Glass (HEA DepartmentalAward £29, 750) and Megs-KT (JISC £72, 872)
  • Education and sustainable design – Aims of post doctoral fellowship• How to engage young people in the problems of sustainable design and sustainable lifestyles.• The role of schools and of education.• The relationship of architectural design, theories and policies of participation.
  • Yes but…Post Doctoral Research Fellowship - Sustainable School DesignWorkshops with Children
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  • School Design Futures Conference UKERC funded “The Meeting Place” Oxford
  • Academic Secondment/ Research FellowUpdate to Defra’s 2008 Framework for Pro-Environmental BehavioursThe Sustainable Lifestyles Framework(2011)
  • POE supporting different ways of being POE supporting emergenttechnologies But which is the most significant? 17
  • Problem. Why do modern building designed forenergy efficiency, using modern simulationprediction tools, frequently fail to perform asintended? Why is the difference between predictedand actual energy use of schools so high?Objective. Understand this difference anddetermine a way to assess this difference.Action: Our emergent approach for sustainableschools. PostOPE (the project) combined differentassessment methods .IMPACT: POE already making a difference inschools. The importance of application of wholeschool methods for the construction industry.
  •   Case Study One Case Study Two Case Study ThreeWindows and ventilation systems “We also have this automatic window “In the whole school there are automatic “Sometimes they [the classrooms] are thing for when it gets too stuffy. When windows that you have to open and really warm and the windows don’t you produce too much CO2 the close with a key and there are only open. None of the windows open. Only windows open, its automatic [...] If you about four keys in the whole school. So the lower ones. In the summer it’s really talk too much in classroom they open that kind of means that you can’t open hot” (Year 7 pupil.) Researcher 1: “Are (laughs)”. the windows in some departments there things you think the architect because you haven’t got a key.” could have done better?” “Just the windows.”ICT and computers “All the computers are always on, they “In there [computer room] as well is the “On hot days the IT suites are the best are never switched off by the power. study centre [full of computers] and it because of the air conditioning.” They are always on standby. [...] its just gets very hot and even if the air con is that the monitor is off. You just logoff on only slight areas get it and it gets and you dont shut it down”. very hot.”Attitudes to energy efficiency and  “I think we should but we have gotten ““I dont even think we are trying. It “...if no one moves in the classroomsustainability used to everything and dont want to go feels like they dont even think they care. then the lights go out and so it’s like back to basics” But they are always banging on about it. when people go out of the room the They are always telling us to save lights go off and so the bills are lower. energy but why not them”. So do you think the bills are lower in this new school? You’re paying less for your electricity and gas or not? Possibly not, because it’s bigger.”Natural and artificial light “It happens [automatic lights switch on] “In the art and music corridor there are “I think we should stop lighting the when you go in, but when you go out full size windows, they go down the full school in the day as the sun lights it up everyone turns them off anyway. In PE length of the building, the problem is alot and we’re wasting electricity” thats what happens as they will go off in that you have to, if you have projectors (Final ‘design’ session, Year 8 pupil). the changing rooms and in PE you just on in an art department you can’t have to jump about a bit. In the store actually see because they don’t have rooms it is straight on. You walk in and blinds so you can’t actually lower the it just turns on. Cleaners’ cupboards and blinds so the projector can see so then stuff”. you can’t really see anything.” 19
  • SUMMARY FINDINGS1. Contradictions between what adults say and what they tell children to do. A mismatch between designers intention and teachers ability to manage the behaviours of pupils – (many examples – dining biggest issue)2. Poorly functioning building features (windows, heating and ventilation systems, circulation, dining spaces) and either over provision or under provision of space and facilities, together with teachers prohibiting use of facilities (toilets locked, .3. Lack of ownership of PFI buildings4. Lack of understanding of the ‘sustainable’ design features of the new school building – solar heating panels5. Convoluted facilities management procedures where prohibitions did nothing towards children establishing their own “authentic” relationship to the environment and a deep or lasting critical perspective on the problems of sustainable development. 20
  • 21
  • Windsor Conference – POSTERPRESENTATIONApril 12th – 15th2012The comfort dimension whenevaluating the discrepancybetween predicted and actualenergy performance in newschool buildingsAndrea Wheeler, Dr MasoudMalekzadeh andProfessor Dino Bouchlaghem
  • Windsor Conference – FULL PAPERApril 12th – 15th2012From Agent of Change to GlobalCitizen?” Dialogue, drawings,narratives and performances ofsecondary school childrenengaged with the design of asustainable school.Andrea WheelerThe Centre for Engineering & Design Education
  • 2nd International Conference on Geographies ofEducation th – 11th 2012September 10“The Future We Want?”Designing a sustainableschool with children as aplace of wellbeingAndrea WheelerThe Centre for Engineering & Design Education
  • PUBLICATIONSWheeler, Andrea, Dino Bouchlaghem and Masoud Malekzadeh (2013)“Emerging Technologies and Emerging Ontologies: Developing a POEmethod for supporting low carbon living” Architectural Engineering andDesign Management Special Issue the Impact of Occupants Behaviouron Energy Consumption (forthcoming)Wheeler, Andrea (2010) “An interview with Harry Shier: Contrastingchildren’s participation in the UK Building Schools for the Future programmewith the Nicaraguan context” International Journal of Children’s RightsVol. 18/3, 457-474 (translated into Spanish for Nicaraguan readersavailable at:http://www.harryshier.110mb.com/docs/Wheeler_Entrevista_a_Harry_Shier.pdf ).
  • Summary• Buildings and behaviour.• Sustainable design demands both ontological and political interrogation: what does it mean to be in an ethical or just relation to the environment and to other human beings?• The question of a sustainable lifestyle relates directly to the traditions of political discourse and philosophical discourse and this cannot be absent from teaching in schools in the context of sustainable development.
  • Engineering Education Conference 2012September 17th – 20th 2012E-mentoring for employability(Higher Education Academy DepartmentalAward £29, 750) 15 monthsDr Andrea Wheeler, Professor Simon Austin andProfessor Jacqui GlassThe Centre for Engineering & Design Education, 1st Floor, Keith Green BuildingSchool of Civil and Building Engineering
  • MEGS-KT(Jisc Funded £72, 872) 12 monthsDr Andrea Wheeler, Dr Paul Rowley and MandyKingThe Centre for Engineering & Design Education, 1st Floor, Keith Green BuildingSchool of Civil and Building Engineering
  • My aspirations for teaching inthe School?DESIGN THEORYARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY – CONSTRUCTIONDETAILING IN TIMBER/ STRUCTURAL CONNECTIONSSUSTAINABLE BUILDING DESIGN – SUSTAINABLESCHOOLSRESEARCH, NETWORK, COLLABORATE AND CONTINUETO PUBLISH
  • Previous Teaching experienceDip.Arch and M.Arch seminars in schooldesign. Subjects that students arepresenting include: The Spatial, Materialand Tectonic qualities of HampshireSchools, The CLASP system, NewAcademies, New Technology in theClassroom.Studio teaching school design project:Chilwell School Project, school childrencritics in studio and workshops withchildren.PhD student supervision: The Impact ofModern Interior Design on KindergartenChildren’s Outputs and Behaviour in theMiddle East Context St Benedicts School, LondonInnovate in the teaching 31 31
  • SKILLS SUMMARYSUCCESS IN WINNING RESEARCH FUNDING , £220,000 UKERC/ESRC over3 years, £29,750 over 15 months, £72,870 Jisc over 12 monthsINTERDISCIPLINARITY – education, social sciences and built environmentCOMMUNICATION SKILLS AND TEAM BUILDING– 20 + internationalconference presentations. 9 invited conference/ seminar presentations,organisation of conferences, MEGS-KT series, project management, supervisionof summer internships.PUBLICATIONS – developed in early career post-doctoral research project andin teaching and learning research projects.
  • Thank You a.s.wheeler@lboro.ac.uk