Content Area LiteracyGSSD CoachesCindy Smith & Andrea Hnatiuk*
**We start and end on time*We are a community of professionals, weparticipate fully, encourage participation fromothers, a...
**What is Literacy?
What will I be able to do whenI am done here today?I can identify and implementeffective instructionalstrategies that can ...
*Why do students havedifficulty readingacademic texts?
*“The need to guideadolescents to advanced stagesof literacy is not necessarilythe result of any teaching orlearning failu...
**Basic Literacy*Intermediate Literacy*Discipline Literacy
*
**Big Question!
LiteracyExpressive ReceptiveSpeak WriteRepre-sentRead View Listen
*
*Buehl, 2011
*When to use it?Ease of use?Pros?Cons?What students will benefit?
**“I have a rain barrel that is 2metres high, and has a diameterof 1.2 metres. How much waterwill it hold?”
*All too often, it is assumed thatsymbolic representation is theonly way to communicatemathematically. The moreflexible st...
*
*It is estimated that a high schoolstudent’s working vocabulary weighsin around 40,000 words -Stahl andNagy, 2006*Vocabula...
**Means teaching the origins of words, themeaning of prefixes and suffixes*Ex: Poly = “many”.Polygon, polynomial, polydact...
Effective Classroom Strategies 20*
Effective Classroom Strategies 21*Effect Size is a unit of measure used with meta-analysis that expresses the increase or ...
Effective Classroom Strategies 22*
What will I be able to do whenI am done here today?I can identify and implementeffective instructionalstrategies that can ...
**Understanding Vocabulary, Scholastic*Literature Review*GSSD Content Area Literacy
**3-2-13 – Important points2 – Learning activities you will try1 – Question you haveGSSD Content Area Literacy
But i am not an english teacher!! 2
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  • Andrea
  • Andrea-Coaches refer to the strategic plan when conducting inservices and when planning with and for teachersStrategic goals: 1- Sustainable infrastructure2- People Engagement3- Accountability for All4- Student Learning and Wellbeing4- Equitable OpportunitiesStrategic Priorities:1 - Excel at key processes -Assessment goes hand in hand with strengthening instruction -Improve effective change management – this is why we a re on a journey, and how we implement and manage the change process2 - Achieve student and family outcomes - effective appropriate assessment lends itself to improving student learning outcomes. Assessment practices allow students to be a part of their learning journey - effective assessment practices also strengthen student and parent engagement, students will have a better picture of where they have been, where they are going, and what steps will be along the way.3 – Achieve financial stewardship4 - Enable people capacity
  • Cindy2 minutes
  • Andrea – LIST – Quick WriteParticipants respond to the question, “What is literacy?”Write/represent in any way – sentences, list, pictorally, etc3 minutesA voluntary sharing
  • Andrea LIST - TargetTime: 5 minutesLearning targets:- Spring from outcomes Guide learningIn student friendly languageWhat students are actually doing and what they are actually going to learnFor todays lesson only – specificTo engage with contentLearning targets triangluates essential content, effective instruction and meaningful learning
  • Cindy LIST Commit and Toss3-5 minParticipants respond to the prompt (1 minute) then toss to one another for 5- 15 seconds).Participants read and share – For about 3-5 minutes.
  • CindyRead1 minute
  • Andrea“Disciplinary Literacy” does not mean being able to read the suspension policy3 minutesThis model was developed by Shanahan and Shanahan (2008)Basic Literacy – is the initial phase of instruction, students decode words, recognize high frequency words, understand conventions of print and attend to meaningIntermediate Literacy – this is when student beginning to move from primary into upper elementary grades, students improve on their reading fluency, begin to expand their vocabularies, and are encountering more increasingly difficult texts. Comprehension strategies become increasingly important, and students are faced with a variety of text structuresDiscipline Literacy – these students are in middle school and high school, they need to handle a curriculum that features various texts and the influence from distinct academic disciplines arises, each discipline has different demands. Students now are expected to become many different kinds of readers and writers.Discipline literacy is contextualized, students need instruction that guides them in reading through discipline lenses – interacting with fiction is different than interacting with nonfiction Disciplinary Literacy is the mot neglected instruction (studies reveal), this discipline literacy is seen as “orphaned responsibility”.
  • Cindy LIST – Think-Pair -Share5 minutesHandout – Literacy in Sk Curriculum – snipits from various curriculumsGoal: Participants are to review curriculum snipits on Literacies and identify commonalities regarding what each says.Highlight and discussGroup feedbackWhat emerging themes were noticed?
  • Andrea - slides 7-8-9 all one activity LIST – Graphic Organizer10-15 minutesNeed to be able to understand textNeed to understand resources for informationneed to be able to understand questionssummarizing and note takingcommunicating ideas to others, communicating learning to me, and all the aims of the curr documents/ ie, full participants, lifelong learners, self reflection etcHow is literacy used? Where is it used? Answering questions, reading text, interpreting questions, communicating ideas, etc. Specific activities are presentations, exams, journals, text reading, media reading, exam writing, posters, etc.
  • Andrea LIST – Model of Graphic OrganizerTime – 5 minDoes not have to be a concept map, could be any format.Be specific, give examples of what this is/ what it looks like in your subject.
  • Cindy LIST – Differentiated Jigsaw – choice in what to read, all on same topic25 total – 15 and 1010 to read then 10 to share minutes (20 max)- INCLUDING sharingChoose an article. Read (highlight or write, etc)Find key point
  • Andrea2 minutesScaffolded instruction, or the gradual release model, is broadly recognized as asuccessful approach for moving classroom instruction from teacher-centered, wholegroupdelivery to student-centered collaboration and independent practice.Sometimes referred to as “I do it, we do it, you do it,” this model proposes a plan ofinstruction that includes demonstration, prompt, and practice.
  • Cindy LIST – Graffiti/Carousel20 minExplain this activity. Each group starts at a different station. Read the Comprehension Strategy at the station. Record your thoughts and ideas, these could be : Benefit, usefulness, potential use, strengths, disciplines (what subject), where and when you could use, assess or not assess, formative or summative, etc.
  • Cindy LIST – Think Aloud1 minuteAndreaGive Handout, “Think Aloud”Purpose – so students can SEE and HEAR the metacognitive aspects. What does the teacher think while they read. This modelling of thought is the first step in the gradual release of responsibility – it is the “I Do” in I Do – We Do – You Do2 minute
  • Cindy1 minConcretelyPictoriallySymbolically …mathematical literacy is more than reading written English langue.
  • Cindy LIST – Word Wall1 minThe more students understand the terms used within a passage, the easier it is for them to understand information they read or hear about the topic (Marzano & Pickering, 2005). It has been found that students must have a working knowledge of 95% of the vocabulary in a passage in order to comprehend it (Lyon, 2009). Several evidence-based instructional strategies are available to frontload targeted vocabulary to promote greater comprehension, as outlined below.Word Walls - What are Word Walls?A word wall is an organized collection of words prominently displayed in a classroom. Word walls provide easy access to words students need. The specific organization of the word wall will match the teacher's purpose: sight words organized by alphabet letter, unit-specific words, new vocabulary words, for example. The most helpful word walls grow and change throughout the year and are used as a learning reference.
  • Cindy1 minResearch shows that time spend on vocabulary makes a positive impact on student achievement.
  • Cindy1 minIf we teach 1 word (affix, base)– we learn anywhere from 10 – 20 new words.
  • Andrea LIST - TargetTime: 5 minutesLearning targets:- Spring from outcomes Guide learningIn student friendly languageWhat students are actually doing and what they are actually going to learnFor todays lesson only – specificTo engage with contentLearning targets triangluates essential content, effective instruction and meaningful learning
  • Andrea/Cindy LIST – 3-2-1important points2 things you will try1 question you still have
  • But i am not an english teacher!! 2

    1. 1. Content Area LiteracyGSSD CoachesCindy Smith & Andrea Hnatiuk*
    2. 2. **We start and end on time*We are a community of professionals, weparticipate fully, encourage participation fromothers, and allow ourselves to be learners*We create a safe place to be heard, we cantake risks*We respect everyone’s point of view*We use technology appropriately in the spirit ofprofessional learning
    3. 3. **What is Literacy?
    4. 4. What will I be able to do whenI am done here today?I can identify and implementeffective instructionalstrategies that can be used incontent areasWhat is important for me tolearn and understand so that Ican hit the target?I must learn and understandstudent need support in contentarea literacyWhat will I do to show that Iunderstand?I can implement effective crosscurricular literacy instructionalstrategies that meet and assiststudent learning outcomes.Moss, C., & Brookhart, M. (2012). Learning targets: Helping students aim for understanding in today’s lesson. Alexandria: ASCD.
    5. 5. *Why do students havedifficulty readingacademic texts?
    6. 6. *“The need to guideadolescents to advanced stagesof literacy is not necessarilythe result of any teaching orlearning failure in thepreschool or primary years;rather, it is a necessary nextstep in normal readingdevelopment.”* -McCombs et al., 2005, pp. 2-3 as cited in Buehl, D. (2011)
    7. 7. **Basic Literacy*Intermediate Literacy*Discipline Literacy
    8. 8. *
    9. 9. **Big Question!
    10. 10. LiteracyExpressive ReceptiveSpeak WriteRepre-sentRead View Listen
    11. 11. *
    12. 12. *Buehl, 2011
    13. 13. *When to use it?Ease of use?Pros?Cons?What students will benefit?
    14. 14. **“I have a rain barrel that is 2metres high, and has a diameterof 1.2 metres. How much waterwill it hold?”
    15. 15. *All too often, it is assumed thatsymbolic representation is theonly way to communicatemathematically. The moreflexible students are in using avariety of representations toexplain and work with themathematics being learned, thedeeper students’ understandingbecomes.
    16. 16. *
    17. 17. *It is estimated that a high schoolstudent’s working vocabulary weighsin around 40,000 words -Stahl andNagy, 2006*Vocabulary is an important factor inacademic success. -Short &Fitzsimmmons, 2007
    18. 18. **Means teaching the origins of words, themeaning of prefixes and suffixes*Ex: Poly = “many”.Polygon, polynomial, polydactyly, polyester, etc.*Saves time, because learners aren’t justmemorizing words, they are understanding howwords work*Helps students make connections to priorknowledge and across curriculum and subjects
    19. 19. Effective Classroom Strategies 20*
    20. 20. Effective Classroom Strategies 21*Effect Size is a unit of measure used with meta-analysis that expresses the increase or decrease instudent achievement*Cohen simplified the range of effect sizes*Small: 0.20 to 0.49*Medium: 0.50 to 0.79*Large: 0.80 and above*
    21. 21. Effective Classroom Strategies 22*
    22. 22. What will I be able to do whenI am done here today?I can identify and implementeffective instructionalstrategies that can be used incontent areasWhat is important for me tolearn and understand so that Ican hit the target?I must learn and understandstudent need support in contentarea literacyWhat will I do to show that Iunderstand?I can implement effective crosscurricular literacy instructionalstrategies that meet and assiststudent learning outcomes.Moss, C., & Brookhart, M. (2012). Learning targets: Helping students aim for understanding in today’s lesson. Alexandria: ASCD.
    23. 23. **Understanding Vocabulary, Scholastic*Literature Review*GSSD Content Area Literacy
    24. 24. **3-2-13 – Important points2 – Learning activities you will try1 – Question you haveGSSD Content Area Literacy
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