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Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance
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Plant Identifcation & Excavation Reconnaissance

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The scope of work included individual reconnaissance of several campus properties with elevated concentrations of contaminants

The scope of work included individual reconnaissance of several campus properties with elevated concentrations of contaminants

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  • 1. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation Zones File No. 11111 May 20, 2008INTRODUCTION & BACKGROUNDOn May 15, 2008 GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc. reviewed five (5) individual parcels formerly owned by theUniversity of Connecticut located in Waterbury, Connecticut. The scope of work included individualreconnaissance of several campus properties with elevated concentrations of lead based soils and toidentify flora present within the areas of concern. Prior explorations of these AOCs by GZA haveidentified excavation & remediation zones of the following properties: 66 Buckingham Street – White House (Former UConn Co-Op) 50 Buckingham Street – Facilities Building 36 Buckingham Street – Hart House 47 Buckingham Street – Smith House (Administration Building) 47 Buckingham Street – Smith Garage 32 Hillside Avenue – Benedict Miller MansionAdditional specifications within the scope of work include photographic documentation of the floraidentified within the excavation and remediation zones, a location map of the species identified and acost estimate of replacement species.OBSERVATIONS & RECOMMENDATIONS Observations recorded during the Site reconnaissance of 66 Buckingham Street include adeceased tree located on the north side of the Site structure and is approximately 30’ – 50’ in heightwith a DBH (depth-at-breast-height) of 17”. The deceased tree was observed as outside the excavationzone but within close proximity to the Site structure, known as the White House (Former UConn Co-Op),and shedding several lower limbs inside the excavation zone (Reference Photos No. 7 & 9 of this report).It is recommended that the deceased tree be considered for removal as it may present liability issues,prevent possible damage to the existing on Site structure, as well as increase operability within theexcavation zone identified. Field oberservations of the property known as the Hart House, located at 36 BuckinghamStreet, revealed several mature and unique specimen of trees and shrubery. Given the geologic andsurficial history of the Waterbury area it is not rare to discover such flora but futher review of thespecimen and the micro-climatic conditions on Site indicate specialized growing conditions which thespecimen were observed to thrive in (Reference Photos No. 18, 24, and 29 of this report). It isrecommended prior to excavation that best management practices are implemented to preserve thesurrounding micro-climatic conditions of the following specimen: Taxodium distichum – Bald Cypress Pinus sylvestris – Scotch Pine Ilex spp. - HollyRecommendations for the Taxodium distichum are based on the USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture)Natural Resource Conservation Service PLANTS Database which congrueniously references the 1988 U.S.Fish and Wildlife Service. National list of vascular plant species that occur in wetlands. U.S. Fish & 1
  • 2. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation Zones File No. 11111 May 20, 2008Wildlife Service Biological Report 88 (26.9) give T. distichum a National Wetland Indicator Status ofObligate Wetland (OBL) which is defined as, “Occurs almost always (estimated probability 99%) undernatural conditions in wetlands”. http://plants.usda.gov/wetinfo.html. The State of Connecticut definesinland wetlands by soil type. The soil types of wetlands are poorly drained, very poorly drained, alluvialand floodplain. http://www.ct.gov. Given the Site characteristics at 36 Buckingham Street it may bedelineated that the micro-climate of the existing species T. distichum may be due to a high water table.Determination of soil characteristics were not part of the scope of work yet, observations of the Site andadjacent flora indicate a low depressional elevation possibly integrated with a high water table create asubitable mico-climate for the T. distichum to thrive. Due to the specimens existing physicalcharacteristic it is with recommendation that Best Management Practices be considered to preserve theexisiting specimen for reasons of cost management as well as historical and cultural significance. Observations recorded during the Site reconnaissance of 36 Buckingham Street include theidentification of known invasive plant species according to state and federal guidelines. According tothe USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture) Natural Resource Conservation Service PLANTS Database,http://plants.usda.gov/, Euonymus alatus, synonyms include: euonymus; winged euonymus; burningbush, was observed as located on the southeasterly side of the Site and is considered an Invasive andNoxious Weed. As well E. alatus appears on CT Department of Environmental Protection’s 2004Connecticut Invasive Plant List, http://www.ct.gov , as an invasive plant to native plant populations but itis not banned within the state. It is recommended for consideration during the remediation phase thatthe native euonymus, Euonymus atropurpureus, be reintroduced into the Site.Observations recorded during the Site reconnaissance of 47 Buckingham Street include the identificaitonof Berberis thunbergii, known as Japanese Barberry, which is also listed on the CTDEP’s ConnecticutInvasive Plant List, http://www.ct.gov.Recommendations for Best Management Practice also should be considered at the Site property of 32Hillside Avenue, known as, Benedict Miller Mansion. Observations recorded during the Sitereconnaissnace included two (2) over mature tree specimen. Recommendations for preservation beconsidered for reasons of cost management as well as historical and cultural significance (ReferencePhotos 50-53). Quercus alba – White Oak Tilia americana – American BasswoodABBREVIATIONSDBH – Depth at Breast Heightsp. – Unknown species within the genius spp. – Plural, refers to all the species within the geniusBEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICESAll specifications for Best Management Practices will be featured on the Proposed Plant ExcavationPlans for appropriate Site properties. 2
  • 3. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation ZonesFile No. 11111 May 20, 2008 66 Buckingham Street – White House (Former UConn Co-Op) Photo 1: Southeast façade of 66 Buckingham Street Cornus florida – Flowering dogwood tree in center of photograph. Vinca sp . – Myrtle or Periwinkle groundcover located beneath the Cornus florida. Hermrocallis l. – Day lilies (plant ground cover) are intermixed throughout the Vinca. 3
  • 4. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation ZonesFile No. 11111 May 20, 2008 66 Buckingham Street – White House (Former UConn Co-Op) Photo 2: Southwest façade of 66 Buckingham StreetThuja occidentailis – American arborvitae or Eastern White Cedar. Identified on Site were two (2) specimen approximately 10’ off the southwest corner of the building.Located in the center of the photograph in between both Thuja a deceased Rhododendron sp. was identified which was observed in the field as out competed by several flora in the immediate area. 4
  • 5. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation ZonesFile No. 11111 May 20, 2008 66 Buckingham Street – White House (Former UConn Co-Op) Photo 3: South façade of 66 Buckingham StreetNo additional species of flora present along the southern façade of the building with the exception of turf. 5
  • 6. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation Zones File No. 11111 May 20, 2008 66 Buckingham Street – White House (Former UConn Co-Op) Photo 4: West façade of 66 Buckingham Street The western façade of 66 Buckingham Street was observed as to having no additional species of flora present with the exception of turf. The two (2) Thuja located on the right side of the photo are present on thesouthwest corner of the identified excavation zone. The Quercus alba – White oak located on the left side of the photo was observed as outside the exaction area. A stone wall (not in photo) demarcates the western property boundary of 66 Buckingham Street. 6
  • 7. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation ZonesFile No. 11111 May 20, 2008 66 Buckingham Street – White House (Former UConn Co-Op) Photo 5: Northwest façade of 66 Buckingham StreetRhododendron spp. – Two (2) Rhododendron shrub specimen are located underneath the electrical meter. Located to the left of the Rhododendron is Hosta spp. Photo 6: Northwest façade of 66 Buckingham Street Hosta spp., a herbaceous groundcover, is seen emitting new foliage amidst its detritus and seed pods. 7
  • 8. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation Zones File No. 11111 May 20, 2008 66 Buckingham Street – White House (Former UConn Co-Op) Photo 7: North façade of 66 Buckingham StreetRhododendron spp. – Rhododendron shrub specimen located to the left of the access ramp. In the foreground branches from a nearby deceased tree. Photo 8: Northeast façade of 66 Buckingham Street Vinca sp . – Myrtle, a groundcover, shown in bloom is located along the pedestrian access way between the building annex. 8
  • 9. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation Zones File No. 11111 May 20, 2008 66 Buckingham Street – White House (Former UConn Co-Op) Photo 9: North façade of 66 Buckingham StreetA dead tree was observed as outside the excavation area and shedding limbs within close proximity of the Site building and inside the excavation zone.Approximately 30’ – 50’ in height and a DBH of 17” removal of the tree is recommended to prevent structural damage to the Site building as well as provide accessibility within the excavation zone. (See Photo 7 for detail photo of debris) 9
  • 10. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation Zones File No. 11111 May 20, 2008 66 Buckingham Street – White House (Former UConn Co-Op) Photo 10: East façade of 66 Buckingham StreetRhododendron vaseyi – The small pink azalea shrub in the middle of the photo amidst Vinca sp. in bloom located in the foreground of the photo. 10
  • 11. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation Zones File No. 11111 May 20, 2008 66 Buckingham Street – White House (Former UConn Co-Op) Photo 11: East façade of 66 Buckingham StreetNarcissus sp. – Daffodils border the foundation of the building located on the eastern façade of the Site building. The shrub in the middle of the photo is wild mulberry, native to the region, but not a part of the historic landscape associated with the Site structure. Photo 12: East façade of 66 Buckingham Street View looking South of four (4) Thuja specimen that were observed as outside the excavation zone on the eastern façade of the Site building. 11
  • 12. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation Zones File No. 11111 May 20, 2008 66 Buckingham Street – White House (Former UConn Co-Op) Photo 13: Far southeast edge of the excavation zone of 66 Buckingham Street View looking east of three (3) Thuja specimen adjacent to the parking lot. Photo 14: View looking south of the property boundary at 66 Buckingham StreetThuja specimens, right hand side of the photo, identified within the excavation zone. Five (5) Thuja specimens, shown on the left hand of the photo, were observed as located outside the excavation zone. 12
  • 13. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation ZonesFile No. 11111 May 20, 2008 66 Buckingham Street – White House (Former UConn Co-Op) Photo 15: View looking west of the northern property boundary at 66 Buckingham StreetNo historic landscaping observed within the excavation zone along the retaining wall dividing the subject Site and the abutter to the north. 50 Buckingham Street – Facilities Building 13
  • 14. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation Zones File No. 11111 May 20, 2008 Photo 16: View looking east of the excavation zone located along the northern property boundary at 50 Buckingham Street. Thuja occidentailis – American arborvitae or Eastern White Cedar. Three (3) specimen observed within the excavation zone, left side of photo, along the northern property boundary. The Cornus florida, Flowering dogwood shown on the right side of the photo was observed as outside the excavation zone and a recommended field marker. Also observed within the excavation zone was turf and a tree stump.Photo 17: View looking west of the excavation zone located along the eastern façade of 50 Buckingham Street. Cornus florida – Flowering dogwood tree in center of photograph. Vinca sp . – Myrtle or Periwinkle groundcover located beneath the Cornus florida. 14
  • 15. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation Zones File No. 11111 May 20, 2008 36 Buckingham Street – Hart House Photo 18: Southern façade of the Hart House located at 36 Buckingham Street Pinus sylvestris – Scotch Pine an evergreen coniferous tree was introduced to America and is considered an exotic species. The form of P. sylvestris is shown in the photo on the left and a detail of its bark is shown in thephoto on the right. Approximately 40’ – 50’ in height this specimen has a DBH of 1’ 9” and a total circumferenceof approximately 4’ 12”. It is recommeded to preserve this specimen through Best Management Pracices during Remediaiton efforts (See beginning of this Report). Euonymus alatus – Synonyms: Winged euonymus, burning bush. Is considered invasive in the state of Connecticut (See beginning of Report and Cost Estimate). 15
  • 16. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation Zones File No. 11111 May 20, 2008 36 Buckingham Street – Hart House Photo 19: Southeastern façade of the Hart House located at 36 Buckingham StreetE. alatus, the light green shrub in the photo, is listed as invasive in the state of Connecticut. Taxus sp., the dark green shrub in the photo, is native to state and region. Photo 20: Eastern façade of the Hart House located at 36 Buckingham Street. Three (3) Juniperus virginiana (middle and left side of the photo) – Eastern Redcedar and Taxus sp. located on the far right. 16
  • 17. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation ZonesFile No. 11111 May 20, 2008 36 Buckingham Street – Hart HousePhoto 21: Eastern façade of the Hart House located at 36 Buckingham Street. Three (3) Taxus spp. of varing habits located in the far left, middle and right hand side of the photo. As well as, Cotoneaster spp. 17
  • 18. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation Zones File No. 11111 May 20, 2008 36 Buckingham Street – Hart House Photo 22: Eastern façade of the Hart House located at 36 Buckingham Street. Cotoneaster sp.Photo 23: Northern façade of the Hart House located at 36 Buckingham Street. Approximately four (4) Taxus sp. 18
  • 19. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation Zones File No. 11111 May 20, 2008 36 Buckingham Street – Hart House Photo 24: Approximate northern property boundary of the Hart House located at 36 Buckingham Street.Taxodium distichum – Bald Cypress is observed approximately 50’-100’ in height with a DBH of 3’8” ” and a total circumference of approximately 10’ 11”. According to USDA National Wetland Indicator Status the Taxodium distichum of Obligate Wetland (OBL) indicating this species can occur an estimated probablilty of 99% under natural conditions in wetlands. http://plants.usda.gov/wetinfo.html Given the Site characterization and a second adjacent Taxodium distichum outside of the excavation zone possibly indicates a localized high water table (See the beginning of this Report). 36 Buckingham Street – Hart House 19
  • 20. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation Zones File No. 11111 May 20, 2008Photo 25: Approximate northern property boundary of the Hart House located at 36 Buckingham Street. The existing canopy spread/drip line of the T. distichum measures approximately 48’.Photo 26: Approximate northern property boundary of the Hart House located at 36 Buckingham Street. Total circumfrence of the T. distichum at the base of the the specimen measures approximately 15’. 20
  • 21. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation ZonesFile No. 11111 May 20, 2008 36 Buckingham Street – Hart HousePhoto 27: Northwestern corner of the Hart House located at 36 Buckingham Street. Pieris spp. – Synonyms include Andromeda an exotic introduced species widely available in the landscaping community. Photo 28: Western façade of the Hart House located at 36 Buckingham Street. A globular Thuja spp. 21
  • 22. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation Zones File No. 11111 May 20, 2008 36 Buckingham Street – Hart HousePhoto 29: Western façade of the Hart House located at 36 Buckingham Street. Ilex spp. – Holly is doubleheaded and measures approximately at DBH of 7” & 5”. 36 Buckingham Street – Hart House 22
  • 23. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation Zones File No. 11111 May 20, 2008Photo 30: Western façade of the Hart House located at 36 Buckingham Street. The habit of this Taxus spp. has resulted in five (5) lateral trunks.Photo 31: Western façade of the Hart House located at 36 Buckingham Street. Prunus serotina – Black Cherry stump with fledgeling saplings. 47 Buckingham Street – Smith House (Administration) 23
  • 24. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation Zones File No. 11111 May 20, 2008Photo 32: Western façade of the Smith House located at 47 Buckingham Street. Acer saccharum – Sugar maple approximate DBH of 11”. The foreground of the photo approximately demarcates the perimeter of the proposed excavation zone. 47 Buckingham Street – Smith House (Administration) 24
  • 25. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation Zones File No. 11111 May 20, 2008 Photo 33 & 34: Western façade of the Smith House located at 47 Buckingham Street. Berberis thunbergii –Japanese Barberry is listed on the CTDEP Invasive Plant Species Plant List shown in Photo No. 33 the green shrubon the far left of the photo. Adjacent is a variety of Acer plamatum – Japanese Maple considered an exotic tree species. In Photo No. 34 Berberis thunbergii grows along side Kalmia latifolia – Mountain Laurel and an assortment of wild tree saplings. Photo 35 & 36: Western façade of the Smith House located at 47 Buckingham Street. Proposed excavation perimeter is observed to exclude the playground area; note the white rock in the foreground of Photo 35 & 36 indicating the approximate excavation parameters measured out in the field. 25
  • 26. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation ZonesFile No. 11111 May 20, 2008 47 Buckingham Street – Smith House (Administration)Photo 37 & 38: Southern façade of the Smith House located at 47 Buckingham Street. Grass and concrete areobserved within the excavation perimeter exhibited in Photo No. 37. Note the two trees in Photo No. 38 are outside the proposed excavation zone. Photo 39 & 40: East & North façade of the Smith House located at 47 Buckingham Street. Only grass was observed as inside the proposed excation zone. 47 Buckingham Street – Smith Garage 26
  • 27. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation Zones File No. 11111 May 20, 2008Photo 41 & 42: East façade of the Smith Garage and a view looking east of the proposed excavation zone. Note field markers indicating the proposed excavation perimeters. Narcissus sp. – Daffodils are observed in Photo No. 41 Photo 43: West façade of the Smith Garage. Two (2) Acer saccharum – Sugar maples observed within the excavation zone behind the Smith Garage. 32 Hillside Avenue – Benedict Miller Mansion 27
  • 28. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation ZonesFile No. 11111 May 20, 2008 Photo 44: South façade of the Miller Mansion. Globular Taxus spp. hedging Photo 45 & 46: Southwest & southeast façade of the Miller Mansion. In total six (6) Taxus spp. flank the southern façade of the Mansion framing the interior hedging. 32 Hillside Avenue – Benedict Miller Mansion 28
  • 29. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation Zones File No. 11111 May 20, 2008Photo 47: View looking South of 32 Hillside Avenue. Herbaceous plantings in the fore and middleground of thephoto within the proposed excavation zone. The Taxus spp. shown in the background are outside the proposed excavation zone.Photo 48 & 49: Eastern façade of Miller Mansion. Narcissus sp. – Daffodils within the proposed excavation zone. Photo No. 49 shows Narcissus sp. in the foreground while Hydrangea paniculata – Peegee Hydrangea is shown within the proposed excavation zone in the background of the photo. 32 Hillside Avenue – Benedict Miller Mansion 29
  • 30. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation Zones File No. 11111 May 20, 2008 Photo 50 & 51: Eastern façade of Miller Mansion overlooking the Quercus alba – White Oak that marks theenterance to the mansion. A photo detail of the circumfrence of the Q. alba totals 11’ 11” with a DBH of 3’ 10”. Best Management Practices are recommended, reference the beginning of this report. 30
  • 31. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation Zones File No. 11111 May 20, 2008 32 Hillside Avenue – Benedict Miller Mansion Photo 52 & 53: Eastern façade of Miller Mansion overlooking the Tilia americana – American Basswood thatmarks the enterance to the mansion. A photo detail of the circumfrence of the T. americana which totals 6’ with a DBH of 2’. Best Management Practices are recommended, reference the beginning of this report. 31
  • 32. Former University Campus Plant Identification within Excavation & Remediation ZonesFile No. 11111 May 20, 2008 32 Hillside Avenue – Benedict Miller MansionPhoto 54: Northern façade of the Miller Mansion adjacent to the portico. Two (2) Hydrangea paniculata are within the proposed excavation zone 32

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