Anno Europeo del Volontariato
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  • 1. Financé par la Commission Européenne International volunteering: ADICE 2 avenue Jean Lebas - 59100 RoubaixTél. +33 3 20 11 22 68 - Fax. +33 3 20 02 10 87 ADICE Rhône-Alpes 70 avenue de la Bruyère - 38100 GrenobleTél. +33 9 81 76 24 32 - Fax. +33 4 76 70 24 32 A concrete impact at the service of social cohesion Conception graphique : adice@adice.asso.fr www.adice.asso.fr
  • 2. VOLUNTEERING, an experience and a meansof making tomorrow’s Europe Our partnersIt must be remembered that volunteering is not an end in itself. It has no meaning if itdoes not generate human capital and social capital. It traces a path towards integrationand employment and represents a crucial factor for the improving of social cohesion. Inthis sense, volunteering gives concrete form to the fundamental values of justice, solidarity,integration and citizenship on which Europe is based. rough the experience the volunteerscontribute to the shaping of the European society and those who are involved outside theirhome countries actively participate in the construction of a Europe of citizensAs a citizen and solidarity experience, volunteering becomes a concrete and relevant meansof fighting against exclusion by enabling young people to reveal their resources, theirtalents and their commitment. Volunteering is all the more adapted in that it answers Europejskie Forum Cemea del Mezzogiorno Kericon the one hand the high expectation of young people to be able to commit themselves in Młodzieży (Pologne) (Italie) (Slovaquie)society « differently » and transform it in order to find a place and also to imagine places. Plac Wolnosci 5/5 Via fortebraccio 1A Nábrežná 1351 57500 Bystrzyca Klodzka 00176 Rome 02201 Čadca,A LONG STANDING commitment on the part Pologne Italy Slovakia www.efm.org.pl www.mezzogiorno.fr www.en.keric.skof ADICE and its partners Tél. +48 748 110 223 Tél. +390 645 492 629 Tél. 00421 41 433 56 85Since 1999 the Adice (the Association for the Development of Citizen and European Fax. +48 748 111 399 Fax. +390 645 493 375 Fax. 00421 41 433 56 87Initiatives) has been committed to this path. In order to fulfil this ambition, it has developed abroad network of partnerships and an internal management system for large-scale Europeanand international volunteering projects. e aim is to give all the volunteers the means,through mobility, of developing social, professional and intercultural skills by making use ofthe various programmes: European Voluntary Service, Amicus, Grundvig.After 10 years of experience, the European Year of Volunteering 2011 will have been theopportunity for the Adice and six of its partners (Europejskie Forum Młodzieży - Poland ;Cemea del Mezzogiorno - Italy ; Keric - Slovakia ; VE France ; Municipalite de Åmål - Suede andPuerto de Lumbreras - Spain) to give visibility to and emphasise the value of the work donein this field. Municipalité de Åmål Municipalité VE FranceEUREKA, an opportunity to assess and go further (Suède) Puerto de Lumbreras (France)« Understand in order to continue to act» - that is in substance what motivated the Adice and (Espagne) Municipality of Åmål Maison des associationsits partners to submit a survey project in the context of the EUREKA (European Universal Kungsgatan 26 Plaza de la Constitución, 2 du XI° arrondissementReference for Enriching Knowledge & Abilities)2 project. 66 231 Åmål 30890 Puerto Lumbreras 8, rue du Général Renault Sweden (Murcia) Espagne 75011 Paris www.amal.se www.puertolumbreras.es www.ve-france.orgA DUAL AMBITION: assessing the opinions Tél. + 46 532 170 00 Tél. +34 968 40 20 13of the volunteers and the effects of volunteering Fax. + 46 532 188 70 Fax. +34 968 40 24 10Conducted with volunteers from 6 European countries (Poland, Slovakia, France, Italy, Spainand Sweden) between June and September 2011, this survey by questionnaire enabled361 people to report the impact of their voluntary service in terms of social integration,employability and development of skills. Special attention was paid to people with feweropportunities. e results of this survey are detailed in this report. For all that, the authors chose not tocontent themselves with a stereotyped presentation. is document has therefore beendrafted with a triple aim:> Sharing the results of the survey (knowledge)> Emphasising the value of the volunteering activities conducted by the European Union and Copas making them more visible (communication) (France)> Encouraging the national public authorities to develop, at their levels, strategies for enhancing the value of and developing volunteering and its usefulness as a lever for social 54/56, rue Nationale promotion (sensitisation). 59000 Lille http://copas.coop/ Tél. 03 28 04 54 24 Fax. 03 28 04 54 251. 2010 report on citizenship in the Union – Remove the obstacles to the exercising of their rights by the citizens of the Union, COM (2010) 603 final dated 27 October 2010.2. Eureka was one of the two French projects subsidised under the European Year of Volunteering 2011 by the European Commission
  • 3. Contents1. Introduction: the survey in a few words ............................................................................................... 51.1. A European and Partnership survey .............................................................................................................................. 51.2. A unique cooperation undertaking ............................................................................................................................... 51.3. 361 respondent: replies of quality but a difficult analysis by country ........................................................ 62. Respondents in the image of the volunteers: mainly young ladies of very diverse nationality and country of residence ...................................................................................................... 72.1. An average age of 23 years for the respondents ..................................................................................................... 72.2. 75% girls ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 72.3. 23 different nationalities ...................................................................................................................................................... 72.4. 29 different countries of residence ................................................................................................................................. 73. e volunteering candidates: diverse profiles (age, education, etc.) for a program that adapts ............................................................................................................................. 83.1. e 20-26 age group, the majority of the candidates … but a program that remains accessible to other age groups ............................................................................ 83.2. Volunteering, a means of consolidating the training paths .............................................................................. 93.3. Two years after: the average scholastic level improves .....................................................................................103.4. An alternative when in a precarious situation .......................................................................................................113.5. A program used more by young people from an urban environment ....................................................123.6. A possible way of being independent of their parents .....................................................................................123.7. Strengthening their experience of travel and commitment ...........................................................................124. Preparing for voluntary service: the highly positive role of the sending structures 144.1. e "grapevine" and the "Internet", the main vehicles for informing and motivating the volunteers .......................................................................................................................................144.2. Young people motivated by the discovery of other cultures and sensitive to the idea of social commitment ................................................................................................................................144.3. Volunteers given support and satisfied with their preparation ...................................................................154.4. A useful preparation to specify and formalise the objectives of the voluntary service ..................154.5. Multiple and precise objectives which remain consistent with the original motives ......................155. Actions and projects of the volunteers: a fruitful experience for everyone, results attained on the whole ....................................................................................................................................185.1. 80% of the projects are "long-term" (between 2 and 12 months) ..............................................................185.2. e short-term voluntary service (20% of the projects lasting less than 2 months): an initial experience of mobility adapted to the publics with fewer opportunities .........................185.3. "Children and Youth": preferential area for hosting the volunteers ...........................................................205.4. For all, a rare opportunity to develop diverse skills through the carrying out of concrete actions .......................................................................................................................................................205.5. Voluntary service, a real contribution to autonomy and opening up ......................................................206. Zoom on the skills acquired .......................................................................................................................236.1. An opportunity to acquire or develop skills: social, linguistic and organisational .............................236.2. e acquisition of technical skills: a lesser impact ...............................................................................................246.3. For 77% of the volunteers, the objectives of their service were attained ...............................................246.4. An improvement expected in the validation of the skills ...............................................................................257. e return of the volunteers: support to be strengthened in order to enhance the value of the experience ...............................................................................................267.1. Volunteers less followed up on their return ............................................................................................................267.2. Volunteers less satisfied with the support provided on their return ........................................................277.3. Difficulties on their return for 57% of the people questioned, in particular for the young people in a precarious situation.......................................................................................................277.4. 44% of the people questioned changed the course of their careers on their return .........................277.5. A program that energises the career project and enables access to employment of one person questioned in 5 ........................................................................................................................................288. Satisfied volunteers … who commit themselves in their turn in order to emphasise the value of this program ..............................................................................................298.1. A very high overall level of satisfaction: 96% ..........................................................................................................298.2. Volunteers who in their turn commit themselves in order to promote this program ....................309. Verbatim, the words used by the volunteers to describe their experience .....................319.1. How their voluntary service experience benefitted them personally .......................................................319.2. What they are most proud of… .....................................................................................................................................32 3
  • 4. Intro1. Introduction : the survey in a few words1.1. A European and Partnership survey> A survey financed by the European Union in the context of the European Year of 1.3. 361 respondents: replies of quality but a difficult analysis by country > All the questionnaire respondents are volunteers who were sent or received by the 6 partner structures. > Some of the partners made available IT tools on their premises for the volunteers who needed them. > VE France, for its part, sent this online questionnaire to all its members. 361 questionnaires were filled in and processed. > e sample initially sought (250 volunteers) was exceeded. Volunteering (EUREKA) > Virtually all the volunteers answered all the questions.> Owned by the ADICE and set in place with 6 partners > On the other hand, the number of respondents was very different from one country to another. • Europejskie Forum > With two partners for France (including a network of former volunteers), 62% of Młodzieży ese 3 associative partners have identical experience the questionnaires were filled in in French. 17% in Polish and 20% of the remaining (Poland) to the ADICE in the field of volunteering. ey questionnaires were in Spanish, Italian, Slovak and English. • Cemea del Mezzogiorno help various publics to set up their international (Italy) volunteering projects, via the EVS in particular. • Keric (Slovakia) e sample sought THE SURVEY CONDUCTED • Municipalite de Åmål 125 Respondents Frequency ese two towns are highly committed to European (Sweden) volunteering. Amal regularly receives European 25 France 62% • Puerto de Lumbreras 63 volunteers. 25 Poland 17% (Spain) 25 Spain 25 7% A national network, this structure brings together 25 Slovakia 18 5% local associations that conduct various initiatives 25 Sweden 16 4% designed to develop and improve the quality and the 25 Italy 16 4% recognition of the European Voluntary Service (EVS). VE France 250 Total 361 100% VE France contributes moreover to developing the commitment to volunteering of young people through extensive cooperation with the Agence Nationale Française. > Consequently, the results presented in this report are overall results as an analysis on a country basis did not have in fact any meaning and was likely to produce> Volunteers questioned via these structures in each country: France, Poland, Sweden, Spain, weird comparisons or interpretations. Italy and Slovakia.1.2. A unique cooperation undertakingIn order to endow themselves with a rigorous methodological framework, the Adice and itspartners called upon the services of an outside firm, COPAS (consultant in social practicesand analyses)3.A firm specialising in social policies in the widest sense (education, youth, social cohesion,etc.), Copas has thus helped the partners with the various stages of this survey: leadingthe work meetings for the designing of the questionnaire, development of the «onlinequestionnaire» techniques, processing of the replies, support for the analysing of the resultsand the drafting of the survey report, etc.In other words this survey was the opportunity to bring together a diverse range of playersand get them working together in a concrete form: association partners, a national network,town councils and an engineering firm. e exchanges were fruitful (work seminar in Lille,joint translation into English, validation time, etc.).Technically speaking, once the questionnaire had been validated and the translations done,each partner took charge of translating the questionnaire into their own language (apartfrom Sweden who opted to go online in English) and sent it to its volunteers.3. www.copas.coop 4 5
  • 5. 22. Respondents in the image of the volunteers: mainly girls of very diverse nationality and country of residence2.1. An average age of 23 years for the respondents 3 3. candidates: e volunteering diverse profiles (age, education, etc.) for a program that adapts e first part of the questionnaire aimed to find out the situation of the volunteers before their departure as volunteers: their age, status and> e average age of the respondents is 23 years. e youngest is 18 and the oldest 45. motives…in order to indentify how their situation had changed on their> e respondents are therefore young on the whole: nearly 70% are under 28. return.> ey replied to this questionnaire approximately two years after their return from their volunteering project. 3.1. e 20-26 age group, the majority of theWe will add that this timescale is doubly pertinent: for the volunteers the experience wassufficiently close in time for them to be able to assess it and measure the effects on their candidates… but a program that remainssituation today (development of their professional project). accessible to other age groups 67% in the 20-26 age group: an opportunity to continue their studies2.2. 75% girls > Since 2007, volunteering is open to young people between 18 and 30 years.> 75% of the respondents are girls. > e results of the questionnaire show however that this program corresponds more to the is proportion is more or less close to the ratios for the recruits of the European Voluntary 20-26 age group (67% of the respondents).Service. In point of fact, 70% on average of the volunteers are girls. We will see subsequentlyin the following pages that this percentage differs slightly according to the duration of the Frequency It will be recalled that this age group correspondsproject. mainly to the higher education class of volunteers. from 20 to less 24% For these young people, volunteering appears than 222.3. 23 different nationalities from 24 to less therefore to be a relevant program for those who 24% are preparing to enter the labour market and make> Whereas they were sent or received by 6 partners, the volunteers who replied to the than 26 choices concerning their future as adults. questionnaire are of 23 different nationalities, 7 of which are not members of the EU: from 22 to less In this sense volunteering may represent for the 19% Ukraine, Turkey, Algeria, Armenia, Belorussia and the Lebanon. than 24 young people:> e two nationalities most represented are France and Poland. Less than 20 13% > either an opportunity to consolidate a study> 95% of the respondents have only one nationality. from 26 to less choice: through the learning of languages and the 12% than 28 job experience in a sector corresponding to their2.4. 29 different countries of residence 28 and over 8% training Total 100% > a different and enriching experience before> Logically, nearly 70% of the respondents live in France or Poland. employment> As for the nationalities, the countries of residence are very varied: 29 countries, 11 of which are not members of the EU. 13% under 20: take a "break" or test out a project… 13% of the respondents were under 20 at the time of their departure. If this is obviously low compared with the higher age groups, this score should not be neglected. For these young people who have by definition not necessarily precisely determined the e key figures e lessons learnt e prospects… outlines of their project for the future (personal or professional), volunteering does not serve the same purpose. Several assumptions are possible and volunteering may represent for > 75% girls > a program used by > Promoting volunteering these young people: > 23 nationalities the young people of among boys, as an > a first approach to standing on their own feet and job experience for young people with > 29 countries of residence diverse European and initial work experience learning difficulties or without any qualifications; neighbouring countries in their professional > a means of "testing out" a professional project before engaging in higher education; > a program that acts as project > an opportunity to "take a break" after a possible first year along an unsatisfactory a melting pot for the > Making volunteering a educational path populations and enables crucial instrument for mobility the commitment of the > a program which, in the young 20% over 26: a means of mitigating the difficulties of labour market integration… way that it has been Lastly, 20% of the volunteers who replied to the questionnaire were over 26 at the time of developed, suits girls their departure. better than boys For these young adults volunteering has another purpose altogether and is apparently a possible "alternative" to: > a fruitless or interminable search for employment > a precarious and/or unsatisfactory work experience 6 7
  • 6. 3 3> To conclude, it transpires fairly clearly that volunteering serves very different purposes e results of the survey tend moreover to validate this assumption in as far as the 25%depending upon the age of the volunteer. is diversity and this malleability are in our of volunteers with a "high school" level before their departure have dropped to only16%opinion an asset to be preserved, enabling each person, depending upon their situation, to on their return and at the same time the percentage of the volunteers having attained afind through this means an opportunity to consolidate a positive training path (continuity), university level on their return has increased (from 57% to 67%).move in another direction or find alternatives to impasse situations, etc. In other words, these 25% of young people who took on voluntary work did not abandon their education courses for all that but resumed them after the voluntary work (continuity)3.2. Volunteering, a means of consolidating 80 the training paths 70 Before departure Frequency 60 Today University or grandes écoles 57% 50 General and technical high school /vocational high school 25% 40 30 Post BAC vocational training (BTS, DUT.) 14% 20 Secondary school (BEPC level) 2% 10 Schooling / vocational training after secondary school 1% 0 (CAP, BEP) University General and technical Post BAC Schooling / Secondary school Total 100% high school / vocational training vocational training (BEPC level) vocational high school (BTS, DUT.) after secondary e average level of education of the volunteers is fairly high since 71% of the respondents school (CAP, BEP)have at least the Bac (baccalaureate - high school dipoloma).Nevertheless, 25% of the volunteers have a high school level and 2% a secondary school level. ese results back up the previous analyses pertaining to the age of the volunteers. > To conclude, it appears fairly clear that volunteering and formal education remain e relationships between volunteering and training (education) can thus take on intimately linked. Volunteering can thus play different roles: "boosting and confirming" avarious forms. study project, enabling it to be questioned in concrete terms with a view to making freshPutting educational choices to the volunteering test choices. In other words, volunteering plays a test function for those who are preparing to take up their place in society as adults.> For the 71% of volunteers with a level of education at least equal to the Baccalaureate (high school), volunteering is the opportunity to put their professional orientation choices to the test of concrete experience.> It is thus interesting to note that 41% of them change their professional orientation on their return. e assumption of the use of volunteering as a means of questioning the relevance of their higher education choices (following the wrong choice of direction or a 3.3. Two years after: the average scholastic level path that is too general or too precise) appears to be confirmed. improves On returning from your voluntary service, did you change your Without it being possible to directly attribute scholastic effects to volunteering, the results professional orientation or course of education in relation to your Frequency clearly show that the scholastic level has improved for all the volunteers. situation before going? In point of fact the table below details progress in the levels of education of the respondents NO 59% between the time they did their voluntary service and the time they filled in the questionnaire, YES 41% i.e. on average two years later. Total 100% For a great number of them, the scholastic level has improved4. > Of the young people who embarked on voluntary service with a "school, vocational training after secondary school" level, only 40% still have the same scholastic level when they replyVolunteering a "plus" for confirming choices and consolidating the professional to our questionnaire. 40% of them have a "post–Bac vocational training" level and 20%, apath "university or grandes écoles" level.> For the same 71% of volunteers with a level at least equal to the Baccalaureate, volunteering > Similarly, of the young people who embarked on voluntary service with a "Secondary is on the contrary a means of consolidating their choices. school" scholastic level, only 57% still have this scholastic level at the time of our survey.> 59% of them in fact maintained and confirmed their projects, thus backing up our second 14% have a "General and technical high school, vocational high school» level, 14% a "post– assumption that these young people use this program to complement their training course Bac vocational training" level and 14% a "university, grandes écoles" level. and/or have the benefit of experience or technical or linguistic enrichment useful for their integration in the labour market.When volunteering enables the volunteers to take a "break" or validate aprofessional orientation> Without being in the majority, 25% of the respondents have a "high school" level.> For these young people volunteering is not therefore directly linked with labour market integration. Its purpose is "preparatory": testing out their project and desires for the future through concrete experience (validating a choice of study) or allowing themselves to take some time out, a break before engaging on their higher education courses. 4. We would however like to point out that the translation into 6 languages of the scholastic levels caused a lot of hesitation on the part of the partners. We think therefore that these results, effective in the context of our survey, deserve to be gone into more deeply in the context of a more thorough study 8 9
  • 7. 3 Secon- dary school (BEPC level) Your scholastic level before volunteering School / after secondary school (CAP, BEP) General vocational and tech- training nical high school / voca- tional high school Post-BAC vocational training (BTS, DUT.) University or grandes TOTAL écoles 3 e difference with the situation of the respondents today is on two levels: > a lesser number of students or young people in training > a bigger number of young people in stable employment > In other words, between the departure and the return from volunteering, the situation of the volunteers has changed for the better. Without being able to directly attribute this result to volunteering, there is no way of getting away from the fact that more of the people who at the time of their departure were in a precarious situation are now either in stable employment or seeking employment … Volunteering thus helps to give back young people prospects for the future which are given concrete form by orientation choices and the continuation of their studies for some and by Secondary the improving of the situation in terms of labour market integration for others. school 57% 1% Volunteering is indeed therefore a relevant program for providing support during this period (BEPC level) of life by enabling the main interested parties to make choices, set in place personal strategiese numbers in brackets correspond to the total number of volunteers in the category. School / and make plans for the future … vocational training 40% 1% 2% 1% after secondary Your scholastic level today school (CAP, BEP) General and technical 3.5. A program used more by young people from an high school / 14% 59% 4% 16% urban environment vocational high school > e majority of the volunteers who replied to the survey are "townies" (68%), living in areas Post-BAC with a wealth of services. vocational > 34% of the respondents live in towns with less than 10,000 inhabitants. 14% 40% 10% 71% 2% 14% training (BTS, DUT.) University or 14% 20% 30% 24% 98% 67% Volunteers Frequency grandes écoles over 50,000 inhabitants 154 43% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 10,000 to 50,000 inhabitants 89 25% TOTAL less than 2,000 inhabitants 56 16%5 (7) (5) (91) (51) (206) (360)() 5,000 to 10,000 inhabitants 38 11% 2,000 to 5,000 inhabitants 24 7% 3.4. An alternative when in a precarious situation TOTAL 361 100% In our survey virtually all the respondents had work experience before their departure (93%), even if for 60% of them it was only a question of “little jobs”. Volunteering is therefore not in absolute terms a "discovery of the world of work" is result has however to be correlated with the fact that the structures from which the Volunteering corresponds indeed to a period of life in which these "future adults" ask volunteers are sent are generally located in urban areas. themselves questions about their future or seek labour market integration (access to In order to diversify the geographic origin of the volunteers and in particular promote the employment remaining the prime characteristic of the casting off of youth). departure of young people from a rural environment, it would be useful to sensitise and e following pie chart shows that before their departure there were as many respondents encourage the local rural networks and structures to use and relay this program or again (43%) in training or education as in a “precarious” job situation (seeking employment, create "mobility relays" (structures or people located in rural areas and capable of directing working on a fixed-term contract or unemployed). the young people to the sending structures). in stable unemployed 7% on placement 4% 3.6. A possible way of being independent employment 7% other of their parents 2% > 60% of the respondents lived with their parents before their departure for voluntary service, employed > 39% of them were "independent" (i.e. lived on their own, in shared accommodation or as on a fixed a couple). term e volunteering program is here again once more an opportunity for young people to contract 16% experience independence from their parents and stand on their own two feet. in training or a student 5. e analysis per country reveals a distinction in the geographic origin of the respondents. us there are far more 43% young Poles from the rural areas than the other nationalities using the volunteering program (40% of the Polish respondents live in an area of less than 2,000 inhabitants compared with 0% for Spain, 6% for Slovakia and Italy, 12% for seeking employment France and Sweden). e geographic origin of the volunteers is therefore a good indication both of the geographical 20% situation of the countries (Poland is a more rural country than Spain) and the strategy of the sending structures.. 10 11
  • 8. 33. 7. Strengthening their experience of travel and commitment e great majority of the young people (77%) who set off as volunteers had a previousexperience of travel, even if for 1 respondent in 2 this was with their parents.> Only 13% of the respondents had never travelled.> 18% of the respondents already had an experience of international voluntary service> 57% of the respondents already had an experience of local volunteering service!> Once again it is the flexibility of the program which has to be emphasised here as an 4 4. Preparing for voluntary service: the highly positive role of the sending organisations e second part of the questionnaire aimed to examine the way in which volunteering was prepared: what were the initial motives of the youngasset. e fact of having previously travelled or engaged in any action whatsoever does not people? How were the objectives of voluntary service defined? How were theconstitute a criterion for selecting the volunteers. host structures chosen?… a way of asking the volunteers to assess the sendingIndividually, volunteering is therefore a means of discovery for some, commitment for others organisations.and an experience of standing on their own two feet for all. 4.1. e "grapevine"6 and the "Internet", the main vehicles for informing and motivating the volunteers e key figures e lessons learnt e prospects > Nearly 50% of the respondents heard about volunteering from someone in their circle of family and friends who had either experienced it first hand or who knew about it. > 19% of the people questioned had heard about volunteering via the media, which e volunteers are rather If volunteering is used Promote voluntary corresponds not surprisingly to the practices of the age range targeted. young, with a high on the whole by young service for the young scholastic level, students people to consolidate people with fewer e "grapevine" and proximity therefore play a preponderant role for the volunteering or in a precarious or prepare their higher opportunities, by candidates who are in the majority people already sensitised to the usefulness of international situation education, it also developing the networks mobility. In this case the sending organisations cash in on the pre-existing motivation. > 67% aged between constitutes a chance for and the specialised On the other hand, it is also important for the sending organisations to be vigilant and 20 and 26 the young people with programs that pay special attention to the most isolated publics (little in the way of social networks, fewer opportunities to accompany them. geographical remoteness from the urban centres in which the volunteering structures, > 71% with a at least high be integrated socially and actions and information are concentrated). school level > 43% in training or work-wise. Encourage students Volunteering is therefore diversification of the 4.2. Young people motivated by the discovery of > 43% in a precarious sufficiently flexible to be able to adapt to and suit sending structures other cultures and sensitive to the idea of social in order to open up situation the diversity of situations volunteering more to commitment > 60% still live with their in which the young the young people more e volunteers who replied to our questionnaire listed their motives for going: parents people find themselves: remote from the offer. > One third of them (28%) stated that their prime motive was the "discovery of other > 68% live in an urban > In order to test out or cultures". area with services complement a training Make volunteering an > On average the determination "to perform an action of commitment" came next (19%) > 77% have already course travelled essential instrument > Lastly, the third motive was the possibility of learning a foreign language > Before embarking on a of the commitment of > 57% already have an > It should be pointed out that compared however with the first three highly "positive" dynamic of job seeking the young people when experience of local motives the fourth one was an alternative to an unfavourable employment situation. us, > In order to get starting out on their for 15% volunteering was chosen because the person "was unable to find work in their community service an experience of professional paths. country". independence when this is difficult to “Your motives” what made you decide to First Second ird Average acquire become a volunteer? choice choice choice > To take a break or gain a fresh impetus in a I couldn’t find work in my country 15% 15% 14% 15% period of uncertainty I wished to become independent 7% 10% 12% 10% or difficulties I wished to take a break 13% 9% 12% 11% I wished to perform an action of 13% 23% 20% 19% commitment I wished to discover other cultures 36% 28% 19% 28% I wished to learn/improve a foreign 10% 20% 20% 16% language Other 6% 0% 3% 3% 6. Somebody around told me.. 12 13
  • 9. 4> To conclude, the initial motives of the volunteers concern first of all issues of socialcohesion: know better, know yourself better, be capable of exchanging through speaking thesame language and be useful.However, it would be misguided to dissociate these "social motives" from a more directlyeconomic motive which is not absent from the concerns of the respondents.Once again, volunteering through its flexibility and its opening up offers this possibility ofcombining social and economic, collective and individual motives, which is after all ratherrare in the various public program or policies, in particular those directed at young people. ese results also show that, far from the representations still often made about youth, thevolunteering candidates have a very precise knowledge of their motives and they do not jointhe mobility programs purely with the aim of travel in mind. 4 4.5. Multiple and precise objectives which remain consistent with the original motives As the results in the table below show, the respondents are conscious of and moreover assert that volunteering is an experience that encompasses several objectives of a different kind. It will be noted that these objectives match their motives (see previous part) even if they are made more explicit, indicating moreover the ability of the mobility programs to maintain this coherence. From the ranking produced following our survey, it will be noted that, > e "discovery of new lands and new cultures" remains the prime objective of volunteering (20%). It relates to social skills (adapting themselves to community life, developing social relations and also improving their knowledge of the host country, its culture, its history, etc.). > "the learning of a foreign language" whilst it was in 4th position for the motives occupies 2nd place for the objectives of volunteering. Here it is a question of dialoguing in a foreign4.3. Volunteers given support and satisfied with their language, improving their command of the language, using it, etc.). preparation > Listed 3rd in the objectives ranking, the respondents stated that the purpose of their e sending organisations have a supporting role to play for the future volunteers before volunteering was to gain in “autonomy and self-confidence”, a motive that was only placedtheir departure (this project is moreover part of a contract with the EU services). in 6th position in the motives ranking. is objective of autonomy/independence can be us, of our panel, drilled down to the personal level (organisation of the day-to-day life: travel, purchases, etc.) or the work level (in the context of the activities, tasks or projects they have to undertake,> 95% of the young people received preparation for the voluntary service from their sending the volunteer may have to take on responsibilities, organise the work of a group, prepare organisations, which virtually all of them are satisfied with. certain materials on their own, etc.).> Of these, only 6% of the respondents said they were not very satisfied or not at all satisfied > On the other hand, while the "citizen commitment" was ranked in 2nd position for motives, with the said preparation. we find it in 4th position for the objectives of volunteering.Generally speaking these results are a good indicator of the quality of the preparation workdone by the sending organisations (154 different sending structures in our survey). ishighly favourable opinion shows moreover that the volunteers recognise the "plus" providedby these bodies which goes beyond simply the technical and material preparation of the 1st 2nd 3rd Averagevoluntary service (housing, travel facilities, etc.) choice choice choice Gain in independence/autonomy and 18% 9% 14% 14%4.4. A useful preparation to specify and formalise self-confidence the objectives of the voluntary service Discover new lands and new cultures 27% 19% 13% 20% e "plus" we are talking about here refers to the contribution made by the organisation to Have a citizen/European commitment 9% 11% 8% 9%the finalising of a coherent project for the volunteers. "Preparing yourself for volunteering" Enrich my technical knowledge in my field 7% 8% 3% 6%means refining the objectives of your project, setting off with the right tools and creating theconditions so that the volunteering is fully beneficial, which is a reality for three-quarters of Learn/improve a foreign language 12% 15% 18% 15%our volunteers: Set up abroad 4% 4% 3% 4%> 72% consider that the objectives of their voluntary service were precise Opening up of new prospects> 66% say that these objectives were formalised. 2% 4% 5% 4% on the labour market Adapting to a new work context 3% 5% 8% 5% “Were the objectives of your Volunteers Frequency Testing myself before entering the labour voluntary service precise?” 3% 2% 4% 3% market YES 258 72% Defining a professional orientation 2% 3% 4% 3% NO 102 28% Total 360 100% Changing my professional orientation 1% 3% 2% 2% Integrating an international mobility experience 5% 5% 7% 6% in a defined professional path “Were the objectives of your voluntary service put down in Learning new work methods 1% 5% 4% 3% Volunteers Frequency writing, formalised (sheet, aid, Gaining experience in order to access training etc.)?” 1% 2% 3% 2% on my return YES 239 66% Testing myself out in a professional capacity 2% 4% 4% 3% NO 121 34% Replacement of military service 2% 1% 1% 1% Total 360 100% 14 15
  • 10. 4> To conclude, it appears fairly clear that whereas the initial motive is more directedtowards social cohesion and commitment, as for the objectives of the project they are moreprecise and focused on the "plus" of the volunteer’s project with a view to improving theirsituation on the return. e host organisations play a crucial role here in raising the level ofprecision of the objectives and expectations.For the volunteers this greater precision of the objectives is fairly revealing of a moreimmediate and more utilitarian projection of volunteering. However, this focusing on theirproject and its usefulness over the short-term does not erase their initial motives. In otherwords, volunteering enables this consensus between the expression of a personal interestand the results expected over the short-term and a more social and citizen commitmentincorporated in a longer timescale. 5 5. Actions and projects of the volunteers: a fruitful experience for everyone, results attained on the whole e questionnaire also aimed to question the volunteers about what had been concretely achieved during their service whether they were short- e key figures e lessons learnt e prospects term or long-term volunteers. What type of task and project had been accomplished? In which sector? Within what type of structure and what they > 50% of the respondents e "grapevine" has a Consolidating the learnt from it over all? heard about vital role in informing dynamic role of the volunteering over the and mobilising the future sending structures 5.1. 80% of the projects are "long-term" grapevine > 20% thanks to the volunteers. e motives and which provide support for the volunteers before (between 2 and 12 months) Internet objectives at the time they set off. > e volunteering projects lasted, for 97% of the respondents, a maximum of one year. > 90% set off thanks to of departure are diverse Strengthening the > Nearly 60% of the respondents set off for between 6 and 12 months, 20% between 2 and 6 Eurepean Voluntary and are mainly linked to support funding for the months and lastly the final 20% for less than 2 months. Service issues of social cohesion. sending organisations to > In all, 80% of the projects were "Long-term" and 20% "Short term". > 95% of the volunteers e young people are enable them to help the > Whatever the duration of the project, for 90% of them, the program used was EVS, AMICUS. had the benefit of therefore conscious of young people with fewer e host countries are very varied. In our survey 55 countries which hosted the volunteers preparation before the many interests of the opportunities. replied to the questionnaire (even if France and Spain stand out from the rest, followed by setting off and 96% are program and this is why Making volunteering an Greece, Germany, Poland and Sweden). satisfied with it they commit themselves area of the Youth Policy, Lastly, the voluntary service took place for over two-thirds (over 70%) of the respondents > 72% consider that to it. whether it be local, within an association – NGO, in generally urban areas. the objectives of their e level of preparation national or European. It will be noted that the services of the local authorities host few volunteers whereas given project were precise and satisfaction of the Encouraging the sending the motives of the volunteers and the objectives of volunteering, they could find this useful. and 66% said they were volunteers underlines the organisations to invest e administrative constraints and the density of the partnership between the sending formalised remarkable work done by in quality procedures, organisations and these services would need to be examined in greater depth. e first 3 motives for the sending organisations both from the and this applies to all the management standpoint going are: countries. and from the standpoint 5.2. e short-term voluntary service (20% of the > the discovery of other cultures is preparation enables of the follow-up of projects lasting less than 2 months): an initial > performing an action of the young volunteers to specify and formalise the volunteers or the assessment of the experience of mobility adapted to the publics with commitment the objectives of their voluntary service. fewer opportunities > learning/improving a project. foreign language Let us remember here that EVS enables adaptation to diverse situations. As a general rule, the is preparation is the sending organisations use the short-term European voluntary service (from 3 weeks to two More precise, the guarantee of a coherent months) as a "first step" program, in particular for the young people with fewer opportunities first 3 objectives of and well –constructed (JAMO). volunteering are: project. > the discovery of other e short-term service volunteers: singular characteristics cultures In this survey and for the authors of this report, it was important to analyse more specifically > learning/improving a the results of the questionnaires filled in by the people who went on a short-term project. foreign language > In our panel 20% of the volunteers went on a short-term project. > gaining in autonomy > Compared with the long-term EVS, there are more boys than girls. and self-confidence > e volunteers are younger at the time of their departure (18-22 years). > Quite logically more of them live with their parents and their scholastic level is lower, since nearly 60% of them have a high school level. > Also more of them have never worked (20% as against 3% for the people who set off on a long-term project) and more of them have never had any experience of international mobility before their departure (31% as against 7% for the people on long-term projects). 16 17
  • 11. 5It is also important to state that they were sensitised to volunteering through other channels:> rough a youth or social support organisation (24% as against 15 for the long-term) rather than by their family network.> e Internet tool is not used as much as by the short-term as the long-term volunteers (15% as against 21% for the long-term).Starting from the assumption that the short-term voluntary services concern more particularlythe young people with fewer opportunities, it is therefore important to emphasise that theirmobilisation is based on different support modes. What is at stake here is the adaptationability of the sending organisations. 5 In the same way, the objectives of autonomy in daily life are less present (this is not the priority), even if the short-term service is an opportunity for the volunteers to learn how to seek and make work contacts. Seek accommodation Seek and make work contacts Organise travel in the country (public transport, accommodation, meals) Manage my money, a budget, ST 6 50 57 49 LT 11 30 70 72 ST LT Perform various administrative formalities Someone in my circle of family and friends informed me about it 31% 29% 12 49 (relations with the institutions) Someone I know who had already been a volunteer 13% 20% Other 1 1 When seeking a job, I was directed to volunteering 4% 2% No, nothing of all that 12 6 rough a youth organisation, social centre, schools, etc. Total 187 239 24% 15% that i went to Table: % Columns – Respondent Base Via the Internet 15% 21% Via another medium (press, advert, television) 6% 4% From the standpoint of human relations (exchanges, meetings, communication) and Other 7% 9% social skills (ability to establish good relations with others, cooperation and team work Total 100% 100% which implies listening, negotiation, etc.), the differences between the short and long-term volunteers are less significant. ST LTA voluntary service more focused on socialising and the experience of living in acommunity Better understand human relations 61 64If the volunteers having done a short-term project express over all the same level of Adapt myself to other cultures and other environments 73 88satisfaction as the long-term EVS volunteers, the purpose of the service is not comparable. Open myself up to and be curious about other cultures 71 76 is initial experience is more often related to a socialising objective (adaptation to living in Discover other values 60 71a community, development of social relations, etc.), and this is confirmed by the volunteersconcerned: Listen to other people 50 61 e technical and linguistic objectives and the taking of initiatives in work situations are Develop my sense of hospitality 31 43therefore less important for example than the following of instructions. Other 4 No, nothing of all that 3 2 ST LT Total 350 409 I was able to express myself in public 15 46 Table: % Columns – Respondent Base Take on responsibilities 48 63 Take initiatives 44 69 Display autonomy 51 67 5.3. "Children and Youth": Express myself in a language other than my own 75 90 preferential area for hosting the volunteers Develop one or more projects 21 55 Fields of activity on the whole fairly varied Follow instructions 39 29 70% of the volunteers did their service in the children and youth sector. Use IT tools 3 31 Several factors can explain this over-representing of this sector: accessible responsibilities, Learn to manage conflicts 11 41 opportunities for conducting concrete actions, the clear interest of the host structures in awakening people to difference, to Europe, etc. a lower level of requirement as regards total Work in a team and cooperate in work situations 68 68 mastery of the language of the host country, etc. Other 5 No, nothing of all that Total 375 564Table: % Columns – Respondent Base 18 19
  • 12. 55.4. For all, a rare opportunity to develop diverse skills through the carrying out of concrete actionsIt is important to remember here that it is not the nature of the tasks or actions that thevolunteers performed that is being examined here, but what these actions promoted. e point of view of the volunteers is fairly explicit since expression in a foreign language,team work, the taking on of initiatives, autonomy and the assuming of responsibilities areeach cited at a rate of over 50%In other words voluntary service is clearly in the eyes of those who have experienced it arelevant means of developing know-how in situations (generally speaking little taught in theinitial training). 5Voluntary service was for me the opportunity to directly manage matters of daily life: Manage my money, a budget, Organise travel in the country (public transport, accommodation, meals) Perform various administrative formalities (relations with the institutions) Volunteers 148 238 237 Frequency 67% 67% 42%We will also note the great consistency between what was allowed in concrete terms during Seek and make work contacts 120 34%the voluntary service and the objectives of the project. Seek accommodation 35 10% No, nothing of all that 25 7% Other 5 1% Total / respondents 354 Voluntary service was for Questioned: 361 / Respondents: 354 / Replies: 808 - Percentages calculated on the basis of the respondents me the opportunity for work Volunteers Frequency experience in which I was able e exchanges, meetings, to: communication with the othersExpress myself in a language 310 during the duration of my Volunteers Frequency 86% volunteering service were theother than my ownWork in a team and cooperate 244 opportunity to … 68%in work situations Adapt myself to other cultures 228 302 84%Take initiatives 64% and other environments 226 Open myself up to and beDisplay autonomy 63% 267 75% 215 curious about other culturesAssume responsibilities 60% Discover other values 245 68%Develop one or more projects 171 48% Better understand human 228I was able to express myself 144 64% 40% relationsin public 125 Listen to other people 210 59%Learn to manage conflicts 35% 110 Develop my sense of hospitality 146 41%Follow instructions 31% Other 10 3%User IT tools 90 25% No, nothing of all that 7 2%Other 15 4% Total / respondents 358No, nothing of all that 1 Questioned: 361 / Respondents: 358 / Replies: 1415 - Percentages calculated on the basis of the respondentsTotal / respondents 359 Voluntary service was for me Volunteers Frequency the opportunity to think about: Cultural diversity 297 83% e European Community 192 53% e importance of the associative or militant 179 50% commitment e inequalities in the world, 153 43% the distribution of wealth e importance of the citizen5.5. Voluntary service, a real contribution to autonomy commitment 144 40% («active citizenship») and opening up e importance of the political 62 17%If the voluntary service experience develops concrete skills that are useful for future labour commitmentmarket integration, it is also the opportunity for the volunteers to approach daily life, the Other 13 4%relations with others, tolerance, etc. in a different and highly practical way. No, nothing of all that 6 2% e results of the questionnaire are perfectly clear on this point: Total / respondents 359 Questioned: 361 / Respondents 359 / Replies: 1046 - Percentages calculated on the basis of the respondents 20 21
  • 13. 5> To conclude, voluntary service has this particularity of enabling the volunteers togain truly concrete experience in using technical, organisational and linguistic skills, etc. whileat the same time promoting the learning of difference, tolerance, etc.As an experience voluntary service is an unprecedented opportunity for the volunteers totrain/ prepare themselves through action for their professional future and understand /thinkabout the social, economic and political issues of the European society in which they live.Ultimately, it is how to take up your place in society tomorrow which is at the heart of thevolunteering experience. 6 6. Zooms on the skills acquired In order to measure the effects of volunteering in terms of skills, the volunteers were questioned about what they had gained from this experience from their standpoint. If what we have here is obviously a self-assessment based on the “statements of the volunteers”, the results are quite significant.To sum up this part: e key figures e lessons learnt e prospects > 60% of the projects last between 6 months and e benefits of volunteering differ Getting volunteering recognised as a period 6.1. An opportunity to acquire or develop skills: 1 year according to the duration of study susceptible social, linguistic and organisational > 20% of the projects last of the service. For the of being validated by e results of the questionnaire are interesting in as far as they can be read in two ways between short-term volunteers universities, training > e most obvious attainments relate first of all to the social and human skills (cited as first 2 and 6 months (less than 2 months), centres and specific choice by 42,2%) and the linguistic skills (cited as first choice by 27,3%). > 20% of the projects last who are also the schools. > On average, the voluntary service is the opportunity to acquire a multitude of skills. less than 2 months youngest > Over 70% of them carry (under 22 years), Making volunteering a out their projects in an the service is first of all part of the employment an opportunity to learn programs for young “Can you tell us, by ranking NGO to live in a community people. the items below from 1 to 6, 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th > 70% carry out their Average (learning of rules, what your greatest attainments choice choice choice choice choice choice projects in the as a % instructions, etc. are in your opinion from your as a % as a % as a % as a % as a % as a % Children/Youth field Encouraging potential volunteering experience?” Voluntary service employers to recognisee enables young people to the social and e acquisition of technical skills 8,4 3,3 4,8 9,4 16,5 56,5 16,1 develop multiple skills organisational skills (IT, etc.) through the performing (autonomy, adaptation, e acquisition of linguistic skills 27,3 27,1 17,4 14,3 10,3 4,5 17,1 of concrete and diverse taking of initiatives, actions. However, team work) acquired e acquisition of organisational the plus provided by during the voluntary skills (project, planning, 7,6 15,5 23,4 17,9 26,2 7,9 16,4 volunteering goes beyond service. organisation of the daily life) the career aspect. For some young people e acquisition of social and For over half of the in fact the technical human skills (knowing how to respondents, this skills acquired during communicate, understanding the 42,2 24,2 14,5 10,3 5,5 2,7 17,0 experience also offers the their training are not other cultures, adapting to other possibility of: sufficient to open up environments, etc.) > an opening up to other the doors of the labour Food for thought about life, people, to differences market for them. politics, Europe, international 7,6 10,7 20,8 25,9 20,7 14,9 16,6 > learning autonomy and relations, etc. responsibility, > learning to work in a Increased desire to act, to commit 6,7 18,9 18,8 21,9 20,4 13,1 16,6 team and cooperate and invest myself... with others > thinking about cultural diversity and the EC 22 23
  • 14. 6From a detailed examination it will be noted that as regards the improving of the linguisticskills, the impact is particularly positive (63% of the volunteers state that this objective wasfully attained). Was your voluntary service the opportunity to improve your linguistic skills? Yes, completely Yes, partially Yes, but only very slightly Not at all 3 Volunteers 32 97 223 Frequency 63% 27% 9% 1% 6“To what extent would you say, on a scale from 1 to 10, that the objectives of your voluntary service were attained?” 8 9 7 5 6 4 11 21 Volunteers 26 66 77 95 Frequency 31% 25% 21% 8% 7% 4% Total 355 100% 3 7 2% 2 3 1% e results are on the whole identical for the acquisition of social skills: 48% of the volunteersstate that this objective was fully attained. 1 2 1% Total 308 100% Social skills? Volunteers Frequency Yes, completely 174 48% 140 6.4. An improvement expected in the validation Yes, partially 39% Yes, but only very slightly 34 9% of the skills Not at all 11 3% Whereas it is a contractual obligation for the host organisations in the context of the EVS, it Total 359 100% will be noted that: > 30% of the respondents did not receive validation of their skills e same applies to the acquisition of organisational skills: 76% of the respondents state that > of the 70% who did receive validation of their skills, this was mainly through the Youth Passthey acquired these skills at least partially (project, planning, organisation of the daily life). (65%) is more negative result has moreover to be associated with a drop in the satisfaction of the Organisational skills? Volunteers Frequency volunteers concerning their return from service (see following part). Yes, partially 142 40% To sum up this part Yes, completely 127 36% Yes, but only very slightly 62 17% e key figures e lessons learnt e prospects Not at all 25 7% Total 356 100% > 90% of the respondents A real impact. Giving the means to think they acquired at e volunteers testify the structures to take least partially linguistic to an acquisition/ the time to validate the and social skills improvement of their skills acquired by the6.2. e acquisition of technical skills: a lesser impact > 76% think they skills, in particular social volunteers.Lastly, to a lesser extent, only 31% of the respondents think they acquired technical skills. acquired at least and linguistic.In particular 29% of them say they did not acquire these skills at all. partially organisational e fact remains that the Equipping the skills skills acquired are many volunteers with a > 42% think they and multiple. portfolio of skills that Technical skills (IT, etc.)? Volunteers Frequency acquired technical skills e great majority of goes beyond the Youth Yes, partially 111 31% > e level of satisfaction the volunteers state that Pass and the Euro Pass. Yes, but only very slightly 103 29% of the respondents the objectives of their Not at all 102 29% with their projects service were attained Equipping the Youth from the standpoint of (effectiveness). Pass with key skills Yes, completely 38 11% the initial objectives is ere is a correlation identifiable and Total 354 100% very great since it is on between the shortness mobilisable in a average 7.3 out of 10. of the project and the European CV recognised > 30% of the volunteers partial acquisition by all.6.3. For 77% of the volunteers, the objectives of their did not have their of the skills. service were attained attainments validated Whereas it is an obligation in the context> By proposing to self-assess themselves and state whether the objectives of their service of the EVS, in particular were attained, 77% of the volunteers gave a positive reply giving a mark of 7 or more (on a via the Youth Pass, scale from 1 to 10) 30% of the people> Only 8% of them considered that the objectives of their voluntary service were not attained questioned did not (mark of under 5) have their attainments> Overall, the effectiveness of the voluntary service is very widely recognised by those who validated. benefitted from it> It will be noted however that these scores are not quite as high for the short-term volunteers. 24 25
  • 15. 77. e return of the volunteers: support to be strengthened in order to enhance the value of the experienceFinally, the last part of the questionnaire was devoted to the issue of the 7 7.2. Volunteers less satisfied with the support provided on their return We will report here that not only are fewer volunteers given support on their return, but the support that is given is deemed to be less relevant. Whereas 53% of them were very satisfied with the support given for the preparation of the voluntary service, only 32% of them were very satisfied with the support they got on their return. Overall are you (very, fairly, not very or not at all) satisfied Volunteers Frequency with this support?return from the voluntary service and the support that the volunteersreceived, if any, from their sending organisations. Fairly satisfied 136 47%> 70% of the volunteers returned directly to their respective countries after their projects. Very satisfied 92 32%> 35% of those who went on a long-term project (as against 6% of those on a short-term Not very satisfied 46 16% projects) continued their stay in their host region out of personal choice or for their private Not at all satisfied 14 5% life (9% only stayed because they found employment or training there; of these there was Total 288 100% a great percentage among the people who were in a precarious situation before their departure). It will be recalled that this support on their return relates to fairly different and varied needs and expectations. For the organisations this implies having resources and skills which are sometimes more akin to career guidance for the young people or skills assessment. e7.1. Volunteers less followed up on their return challenge therefore for tomorrow indeed consists in rethinking this step with a view to a better link-up between the sending organisations and the local players (public services,Whereas 95% of them prepared their service with their sending organisation before their training centres, businesses, etc.).departure, only 68% of the volunteers said they took stock of their situation with this sameorganisation on their return. 7.3. Difficulties on their return for 57% of the people “Did you, on your return, take questioned, in particular for the young people stock of your experience with Volunteers Frequency your sending organisation?” in a precarious situation YES 238 68% is step is all the more crucial in that 57% of the respondents state that that they had NO 111 32% difficulties7 on their return. A more in-depth analysis of the situations of the young people before their departure shows Total 349 100% in particular that, the more the young people were in a precarious situation before their departure, the more difficulties they encountered in making their experience count with potential employers or to find a job.Of those who took stock of their situation with their sending structure on their return For these volunteers having developed skills and (re)gained positive dynamics, the setting> 39% say they were "greatly or fairly well" supported in their job searches/careers etc. in place of more personalised support with a view to "converting the try" constitutes a big challenge.> 32% consider that they were given no support at all with their job searches/careers etc. is score is very high considering the fact that support on return is not optional (see the InManual of the European Voluntary Service published by the European Community). “From a practical standpoint, what were the main Total Precarious training difficulties you encountered on your return?” as a % situation or a student “If so, did you receive support, I encountered no difficulties 43% 32% 46% advice, vocational guidance or I found I was considerably out of step with my 35% 43% 33% help with your personal and/ family circle or my professional environment Volunteers Frequency or career steps (new project? I found it difficult to make this experience count making of contact with other 15% 21% 13% with employers organisations?)” I had difficulties finding a job 15% 21% 10% No, not at all 97 32% Other 10% 14% 6% Yes, a little 91 30% I experienced difficulties carrying out my Yes, quite a lot 64 21% 9% 10% 8% administrative formalities Yes, a lot 55 18% I experienced difficulties finding accommodation 4% 6% 3% Total 307 100% I experienced health problems 4% 5% 3% 7. is figure varies according to the duration of the project. us, 65% encountered difficulties after a long-term project as against only 30% after a short-term project. 26 27
  • 16. 77.4. 44% of the people questioned changed the course of their careers on their return44% of the respondents who went on a long-term project (as against 27% of those who wenton a short-term project) changed the course of their professional orientation on their return,for reasons linked to the discovery enabled by their mobility and the skills acquired throughtheir project (the people in a precarious situation before their departure talk more aboutdifficulties of finding employment). “If so, what were the reasons for this change of career?” Volunteers Frequency 7 To sum up this part e key figures > 68% of the volunteers questioned took stock with their sending organisation on their return and 32% of them consider that they did not receive any support e lessons learnt e more the young people are in a precarious situation before their departure, the more they experience difficulties on their return, in particular with getting their skills to e prospects e follow-up on the return necessitates for the sending organisations skills that they do not systematically possess: professional orientaion Because the voluntary service enabled me with their professional count and finding a job. for the young people, to discover other fields of employment that 71 50% orientation steps on assessment of skills, interested me their return. e more the etc. So it is necessary to > Only 32% of them were respondents consider help these structures Because the voluntary service enabled me to satisfied with their they were given good to become part of a acquire new skills, new "personal skills" that I 48 34% support on their return. support on their return, network in order to wish to exploit > 57% of the respondents the more they remember organise the relays. Because the voluntary service made me want to carry out more useful actions for society, 41 29% say they experienced their experience of others, etc. difficulties on their volunteering with Identifying correctly all return (in particular satisfaction. the relays involved in the Other 19 13% being out of step with field of the employment Because I could not find a job in my old sector their family circle and of young people in 16 11% of activity or profession getting their experience order to ensure effective Total / respondents 142 to count with professional orientation.Questioned: 361 / Respondents: 142 / Replies: 195 - Percentages calculated on the basis of the respondents employers). > 44% changed Positioning theHere again these changes in orientation, the expression of these choices deserve to be given the course of sending organisationsupport in order to “maximise” the volunteering effect. their professional as a mediator with orientation. the relays, in order > Volunteering has to encourage the positive effects on structures specialised professional guidance in the employment of for nearly 70% of the young people to exploit respondents. volunteering.7.5. A program that energises the professional project and enables access to employment of one person questioned in 5> Lastly, and more generally speaking, 47% of the people questioned think that voluntary service enabled them to energise their career project> For 20% of them this project enabled them to find a job.> To a lesser extent, but without neglecting this result, 13% of them say that the service they did enabled them to create an associative project and 3% to set up in business. “Would you say your voluntary service Volunteers Frequency enabled you to:” Energise my professional project 164 47% No, nothing of all that 99 28% Find a job 66 19% Start a training course 50 14% Develop an associative project 47 13% Other 31 9% Set up my company 10 3% Total / respondents 349Questioned:: 361 / Respondents: 349 / Replies: 467 - Percentages calculated on the basis of the respondents 28 29
  • 17. 88. Satisfied volunteers... who commit themselves in their turn in order to emphasise the value of this program 8 > e majority of them, on their own initiative (68% of those who commit themselves in order to promote volunteering), by bearing witness to their experience via the media or in schools. > e volunteers having experienced the short-term voluntary service commit themselves moreover more than those who went on a long-term project (71% as against 67%). “If you commit yourself to promoting volunteering, you will do this with which organisation?” Alone, on my own initiative Volunteers 142 Frequency 61% e structure which sent you 89 39%8.1. A very high overall level of satisfaction: 96% (sending structure) e overall level of satisfaction of the respondents with volunteering is particularly high (96%)8. Another structure (social centre, 55 24% youth association, etc.) is score, quite rare, shows to what extent the voluntary service in its organisation, Your host structure 31 13%implementation conditions and its flexibility is recognised as being well adapted by those whohave used it. e former volunteers’ association 21 9% Other 21 9% “Would you say that overall you were very, fairly, not very Total / respondents 231 Volunteers Frequency or not at all satisfied with your Questioned: 361 / Respondents:: 231 / Replies : 359 - Percentages calculated on the basis of the respondents voluntary service?” “If so, how?” Volunteers Frequency Very satisfied 215 60% 130 By exchanging/bearing witness Fairly satisfied 36% 104 46,2% via blogs, Facebook Not very satisfied 11 3% An interview or by writing an Not at all satisfied 1 59 26,2% article (newspaper, magazines) Total 357 100% By going to schools, social centres 58 25,8% e volunteering experience also has effects on the personal practices of the people doing or other structuresvoluntary service. "Sponsoring" future volunteers 48 21,3%> ey state that they are in fact more attracted by the discovery of other lands, more interested Other, specify 45 20% in European issues or international cooperation. By organising an exhibition> ey also assert that they wish to commit themselves to solidarity projects or conduct 34 15,1% (films, photos...) projects in the youth area. By becoming involved in anIn other words, the effects induced by volunteering can also be measured in terms of citizenship. 28 12,4% association of former volunteers “Would you say that your experience of Total / respondents 225 Volunteers Frequency volunteering has given you a desire to...” Questioned: 361 / Respondents: 225 / Replies: 376 - Percentages calculated on the basis of the respondents Set off to discover foreign countries 301 84% To sum up this part Take a greater interest in European issues or 169 47% e key figures e lessons learnt e prospects international cooperation Commit yourself to a solidarity association or 150 42% > 96% of the respondents e overall level of Making volunteering an other NGO Conduct European projects with other young are very or fairly satisfied satisfaction of the area of the local Youth 132 37% with their experience as a respondents with their Policy, backed by the local people volunteer. voluntary projects attains and national institutions. Change your everyday behaviour and > for 84% of them their scores that are rarely seen, habits: fair trade, energy saving, sorting of 102 28% experience gave them in particular for the youth Encouraging sponsoring waste, purchase of sustainable development the desire to set off to programs. is high level between volunteers in products discover other lands, for shows the extent to which order to get the various Take part in the drawing up of the youth 47% of them they became this program is adapted 67 19% mobility possibilities policies of my country interested in European and to the situation of young known (via blogs, social Nothing of all that 12 3% international issues. people, and the extent to networks, testimonies). Total / respondents 359 > 68% of them commit which it is a tool bringing themselves in their turn to them a great number ofQuestioned: 361 / Respondents: 359 / Replies: 933 - Percentages calculated on the basis of the respondents Encouraging the sending promoting volunteering, pluses, including some that and host structures to8.2. Volunteers who in their turn commit themselves in particular on their own are unsuspected. systematically create in order to promote this program initiative through the a blog/website that media. is is even truer of identifies the benefits> More than 2 volunteers in 3 (68% of them) commit themselves on their return in order to the short-term volunteers. of the volunteering promote volunteering. experience.8. In this respect the lower level of overall satisfaction of the people on a short-term project should be noted.. 30 31
  • 18. 99. Verbatim, the words used by the volunteers to describe their experience e questionnaire left the volunteers the possibility of expressing their thoughts > e voluntary service enabled me to fully satisfy myfreely on: desire for direct action in the field on a full time basis> how their voluntary service experience benefitted them personally and to help others. It also enabled me to become> what they are most proud of stronger and gain in assurance, making the meetings easier and more numerous.In order to conclude this report, we therefore chose to include some of these directtestimonies. > Independence – Learning how to assert myself - Patience and flexibility – Discovery of new cultures. > I felt useful, much more than in any of the companies where I had had the opportunity to work. I also met9.1. How their voluntary service experience benefitted some wonderful people and have I never felt so free. them personally > e European voluntary service brought me more self- confidence and a spirit of initiative. > Open-mindedness, future prospects, sharpened up my > I learnt how to be even more tolerant, to display curiosity about the world and Europe; desire to live and solidarity, to listen to others and to try to understand work abroad; resumed my studies in conjunction with the their problems. setting up of European projects; mastery of English... > I was able to take stock of what I wanted to do with > Did me a world of good!! My short-term EVS was an my life. After my volunteering, I was convinced of unforgettable experience, a positive period in my life the importance of associative commitment, which I which is continuing since I am in constant contact with put into practice by becoming an active member of my sending association. Amnesty International. > I learnt to adapt myself, to discover a different culture, to be patient, to set up projects on my own without any outside help... > Volunteering taught me to know myself better and to gain 9.2. What they are most proud of… confidence in myself, in my initiatives and my abilities. > What gave me the greatest pride was organising and handling several projects from A to Z, Furthermore it enabled me to clarify my professional for which I was totally responsible. project. > What I am most proud of is quite simply the initiative of committing myself to this > A taste for going abroad, a greater open-mindedness, self- volunteering. I cannot feel "pride" for simple actions which ought to be commonplace and confidence, a fresh dynamic, and the conviction that you even everyday. can learn something new every day and from everybody. > What I am most "proud" of is the relationship I developed with disabled children during> is European voluntary service is a unique life experience that enables you to rediscover my last week. yourself. It enables enrichment second to none, through autonomy, self-confidence, discovery, exchange, etc. > I built a musical instrument.> From the personal standpoint, the service brought me a few linguistic and organisational > e exchanges. skills and great autonomy. > I succeeded in setting in place a project for the non-formal education of refugee children> Pride, autonomy, I’m proud of what I did. in a community where some people were reticent about it.> An open-mindedness and an ability to adapt myself and get by on my own. > Taking charge of a project from start to finish.> For me the EVS was a springboard; before setting off I had completely lost my bearings. > e organisation of a day of games and surprises for the children of the city’s orphanages Today I can say that I have gained in autonomy and above all self-confidence! or reception centres.> is volunteering enabled me to fulfil myself fully, at a period in my life when I was asking > Succeed in working with colleagues only speaking the local language. A little victory, but an myself questions about my personal future and my career. I had the great fortune to be enormous amount of effort and bringing into question. received by people who put a lot of trust in me. > Having succeeded in conducting regular actions with a socially difficult public.> It enabled me to have to deal with certain situations and realise that I was capable of it. I also encountered other cultures, other people and my future husband.> Volunteering enabled me to develop my self-confidence and give me confidence in my professional project, as well as developing my organisational, adaptation and listening abilities. And above all open-mindedness. 32 33
  • 19. > e setting in place of an inventory project for the amphibious/reptile species in the reserve.> Stimulating the educational aspect of the farm on which I was working (this aspect had not been developed at all at the time and since then it has truly become a field of action of the manager of the structure).> Learning a completely new language and being able to communicate with the people and talk to them about my country.> Having succeeded in getting myself accepted and appreciated in an environment where trust is a distant concept.> I created a plastic art workshop in a prison.> Managing to convince the other members of the organisation of the importance of recycling (whether creative or not).> Working with children on the topic of France and having got them to discover my country through diverse activities.> Speaking in English in public, saying a few words in Macedonian and reading the Cyrillic alphabet .> Succeeding in communicating in a foreign language.> Having brought, without any pressure, without expecting anything in return, my knowledge and my experience to all these young adolescents. Human contact and discussions have no price.> With other young people in the association, we conducted several actions aimed to sensitise people to fair trade and the impacts of globalisation.> Autonomy. I was managing a nature site. It is exactly the work I wish to do "later". So I know I am capable of it.> Having succeeded in working collectively and having trusted the others to develop along the lines of my way of thinking, living and working.> My abilities to adapt to a new environment, the development of a social life like in France. Never did I feel ill at ease. 34