Nanoy

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Nanoy

  1. 1. General Information Emily Dickinson was an American poet and she was born on 10th of December 1830 in Amherst Massachusetts and she died on 1886. Emily Dickinson, regarded as one of America’s greatest poets, is also well known for her unusual life of self imposed social seclusion. Living a life of simplicity and seclusion, she yet wrote poetry of great power; questioning the nature of immortality and death, with at times an almost mantric quality. Her different lifestyle created an aura; often romanticised, and frequently a source of interest and speculation. But ultimately Emily Dickinson is remembered for her unique poetry. Within short, compact phrases she expressed far-reaching ideas; amidst paradox and uncertainty her poetry has an undeniable capacity to move.
  2. 2. Early Life Her family were pillars of the local community; their house known as ―The Homestead‖ or ―Mansion‖ was often used as a meeting place for distinguished visitors including, Ralph Waldo Emerson. As a young child, Emily proved to be a bright and conscientious student. She showed a sharp intelligence, and was able to create many original writings of rhyming stories, delighting her fellow classmates. Emily’s father was strict and keen to bring up his children in the proper way. Emily said of her father. ―his heart was pure and terrible‖. His strictness can be shown through his censorship of reading materials; Walt Whitman for example was considered ―too inappropriate‖ and novels had to be smuggled into the house. In response, Emily was highly deferential to her father and other male figures of authority. But in her own way she loved and respected her father, even if at times, he appeared to be aloof. At a young age, she said she wished to be the ―best little girl‖. However despite her attempts to please and be well thought of, she was also at the same time independently minded, and quite willing to refuse the prevailing orthodoxy’s on certain issues.
  3. 3. Teenage Years Dickinson spent seven years at the Academy, taking classes in English and classical Literature, Latin, botany, geology, history, "mental philosophy," and arithmetic. Daniel Taggart Fiske, the school's principal at the time, would later recall that Dickinson was "very bright" and "an excellent scholar, of exemplary deportment, faithful in all school duties". Although she had a few terms off due to illness—the longest of which was in 1845–1846, when she was enrolled for only eleven weeks—she enjoyed her strenuous studies, writing to a friend that the Academy was "a very fine school". Dickinson was troubled from a young age by the "deepening menace" of death, especially the deaths of those who were close to her. After an incident She became so melancholic that her parents sent her to stay with family in Boston to recover. With her health and spirits restored, she soon returned to Amherst Academy to continue her studies During this period, she first met people who were to become lifelong friends and correspondents, such as Abiah Root , Abby Wood, Jane Humphrey, and Susan Huntington Gilbert (who later married Emily's brother Austin).
  4. 4. Poems... My life closed twice before its close. It yet remains to see If immortality unveil A third event to me, So huge, so hopeless to conceive As these that twice befell, Parting is all we know of heaven, And all we need of hell. A door just opened on a street-I, lost, was passing by-An instant's width of warmth disclosed And wealth, and company. The door as sudden shut, and I, I, lost, was passing by,-Lost doubly, but by contrast most, Enlightening misery. A long, long sleep, a famous sleep That makes no show for dawn By stretch of limb or stir of lid, -An independent one. Was ever idleness like this? Within a hut of stone To bask the centuries away Nor once look up for noon?
  5. 5. 1.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emily_Dickinson 2.http://www.biographyonline.net/poets/emily_ dickinson.html 3.http://mith.umd.edu//WomensStudies/Readi ngRoom/Poetry/Dickinson/ Elisavet Nanou A3

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