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[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
[SIS] The Psychology of Objects
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[SIS] The Psychology of Objects

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lecture in a series from Strategic Design & Management Summer Intensive at Parsons the New School for Design http://parsons-sis2014.tumblr.com

lecture in a series from Strategic Design & Management Summer Intensive at Parsons the New School for Design http://parsons-sis2014.tumblr.com

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  • 1. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 the psychology of objects 1 Strategic Design & Management Summer 2014
  • 2. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 a door is not just a door …a design solution to meet a set of specific needs.
  • 3. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 3 let’s examine our classroom how are the objects designed to afford a specific use?
  • 4. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 …provide clues as to the operation of things (affordances). Functions ritual/scenarios Usability mechanics 4 what is good design? works with natural human cognition and anticipates actual human scenarios and stories.
  • 5. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 what is bad design? bad design tries to talk itself out of the problem (cognitive dissonance).
  • 6. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 Brand meaning Functions ritual Usability mechanics 6 great design transforms diverse scenarios the relationship between function and emotional meaning is cast in the people that use the products we design
  • 7. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 objects tell a story can we unpack all the decisions that were made in any given object... what problem do they answer?
  • 8. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 great design endures over time “The best ecological strategy is to make products of a very high creative quality, so you can keep them for three generations.” Phillipe Starck
  • 9. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 the design establishes your value articulating relevance, purpose and sustainability VALUEPEOPLE DESIGN DIFFERENTIATIONSEGMENTS
  • 10. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 maslow’s heirarchy of needs our needs rank up in relation to what we believe we get in return
  • 11. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 affordances feedback Do the clues match I get? need desire crave want decoding consumer motivation motive
  • 12. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 what decisions take longer? why? slowquick
  • 13. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 Usability mechanics it starts with making certain key features work reliabaly what made the Blackberry valuable?
  • 14. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 Alex Lee / OXO International Usability mechanics universal design opens up usability “helping people without letting them know they are being helped.”
  • 15. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 Brand meaning Functions ritual Usability mechanics good design feeds ritual and brand
  • 16. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 Aspiration what triggers emotion? Totem what is the power of ownership? Ritual what stories will inspire? fashion is about casting the right balance of tangible and intangible features and building emotional meaning. the power of ownership
  • 17. TIM STOCK SUMMER 201417 the culture of reading our understanding of “reading” will evolve based on the behaviors that generate context for what reinforces cultural codes.
  • 18. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 18 challenge: technology and reading does new technology replace books?
  • 19. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 Share MarketerConsumer Relevance building sustainable insights the innovators recognizes that the product continues to evolve in the hands of the consumer DESIGN
  • 20. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 stop thinking like a salesman innovation will never come from wearing down the consumer to our needs. 20
  • 21. TIM STOCK SUMMER 201421 case: Tropicana Rebranding
  • 22. TIM STOCK SUMMER 201410 PHILIPPE STARCK human centered design building stories that product “the result”
  • 23. TIM STOCK SUMMER 201423 brand centric / human centric
  • 24. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 DISCOVERYCONTROL prisons vs. parks a mirror view of how affordances and feedback play out in designing features.
  • 25. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 central park is an illusion of engineering above ground it is a designed landscape that copies nature so closely that it disguises its own fabrication, and below ground, it is an efficient technological system,"
  • 26. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 encourage serendipity design is hidden appear natural parks encourage discovery
  • 27. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 "sentiment of an invisible omniscience." the panopticon …a type of prison building to allow an observer to observe (- opticon) all (pan-) prisoners without the prisoners being able to tell whether they are being watched.
  • 28. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 nothing is hidden limited mechanics monitored usage 28 prisons design extreme control a system designed to remove any other possible path of use or experience.
  • 29. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 a hint of the prison in the park people like to sit... but don’t get too comfortable. DISCOVERYCONTROL
  • 30. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 discovery (“I’ve got a better idea”) orientation control to restrict use controlling the mechanics challenges human reflexes
  • 31. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 RADIUS ergonomic toothbrush orientation control in product design controlling how we postion the brush
  • 32. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 Helvetic aA Documentary Film Helvetica A Documentary Film typography orients us
  • 33. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 brand’s choice of typeface why so many brands choose Helvetica?
  • 34. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 brand’s choice of typeface strategy requires consistency and creative evolution
  • 35. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 Helvetica A Documentary Film typography as weapon of control “the way something is dressed will define how you will react to it”
  • 36. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 controlling access to certain features to focus the experience/use. physical control shapes a particular experience
  • 37. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 controlling access to certain features to focus the experience/use. physical control directs physical narrative
  • 38. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 museums control physical narrative museums curate shows to tell a compelling story
  • 39. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 museum hacks open the story up when the experience becomes too guided
  • 40. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 IKEA frames how the story is consumed IKEA organizes their stores much like a curated exhibition
  • 41. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 IKEA hacks when the product experience becomes too directed
  • 42. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 Just for Kicks sneaker culture was born from our instintive nature to edit and reshape things
  • 43. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 packaging hacks Altoids tins incite a maker subculture
  • 44. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 packaging hacks QueInteresante labels crayon colors with the names of the chemical compounds that produce them
  • 45. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 Coke/Mentos as brand hack a brand wakes up to brand discovery as part of the core architecture
  • 46. TIM STOCK SUMMER 201446 physical control can broaden usage jitterbug phones reverse design features to match landline phone devices.
  • 47. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 physical control can remove complexity control can help rewire behavior and engage consumers by leading and focusing the experience 47
  • 48. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 48 physical control can remove complexity control can help rewire behavior and engage consumers by leading and focusing the experience
  • 49. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 control of design can draw us into new expectations of how things should work. physical control can increase emotional involvement 49
  • 50. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 structural control attempts to remove threats taking away the object altogether...
  • 51. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 physical control and economics tv networks and advertisers remove the “skip” button.
  • 52. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 structural control incites disruption humans seek to free things...and get them for free.
  • 53. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 freedom beats control how does Netflix change the design framework for TV?
  • 54. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 the future of television kills the pilot Kevin Spacey urges TV to give control to viewers
  • 55. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 awareness of when not to ov tasks people need to s design leadership can be about what you don’t do structural control as brand focus
  • 56. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 Louis Vuitton pulls back on brand expansion to curb dilution in China structural control to protect dilution 56
  • 57. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 INNOVATION from signal to story... synchronizing brands for purpose and sustainability 57 BRAND ARCHITECTURE storiessignals innovation is a mating game
  • 58. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 what the brand wants DISCOVERYCONTROL what the consumer wants 58 strong brand architecture rests on understanding the right balance
  • 59. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 59 saturation efficiencies hyperbole complexity methods that unleash consumer backlash too many line extensions too many similar product offerings following every trend blindly enemies of strong brand architecture the competitiveness brands face can distract
  • 60. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 cultural exercise: identify the language that conveys levels of relevance 60
  • 61. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 this afternoon CITY AS CANVAS
  • 62. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 the heart of great brand is culture
  • 63. TIM STOCK SUMMER 2014 63 this afternoon: meet at 2pm in the entrance of MCNY 6 By subway: #6 Lexington Avenue train to 103rd Street, walk three blocks west 1220 Fifth Avenue (at 103rd Street) central park

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