Sample patent invalidity report analyst oserve

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Sample patent invalidity report analyst oserve

  1. 1. analystoserve@gmail.com  INVALIDITY SEARCH REPORT – 7,254,119 Subject Patent: US 7,254,119 Claim of Interest: 1 Priority Date: May 28, 2003 Results Index Claim Mapping: Result 1 .......................................................................................................................... 4  Claim Mapping: Result 2 .......................................................................................................................... 6  Claim Mapping: Result 3 .......................................................................................................................... 8  Claim Mapping: Result 4 ........................................................................................................................ 10  Claim Mapping: Result 5 ........................................................................................................................ 12  Claim Mapping: Result 6 ........................................................................................................................ 14  Claim Mapping: Result 7 ........................................................................................................................ 16  Claim Mapping: Result 8 ........................................................................................................................ 18 
  2. 2. analystoserve@gmail.com  Keywords: Wireless wide area network, WWAN, Code division multiple access, CDMA, IEEE 802.1x,  interconnect, Combined, alliance, together, mobile, PDA, computer, Cell phone, Wireless device  Search Strategies S. No. Key Strings 1 ALL=(((WWAN OR (wireless NEAR2 wide NEAR2 area NEAR2 network) OR CDMA OR (code NEAR2 division NEAR2 Multiple NEAR2 access)) NEAR15 (WLAN OR (Wireless NEAR2 local NEAR2 area NEAR2 network) OR IEEE)) NEAR10 (interconnect* OR (inter NEAR2 connect*3) OR Combined OR Coupled OR alliance OR together)) AND (PRD>=(19900101) AND PRD<=(20030528)) AND PRC=(US) AND AIOE=(H04W* OR H04L* OR H04M*); 2 ALL=((WWAN OR (wireless NEAR2 wide NEAR2 area NEAR2 network) OR CDMA OR (code NEAR2 division NEAR2 Multiple NEAR2 access)) NEAR15 (WLAN OR (Wireless NEAR2 local NEAR2 area NEAR2 network) OR IEEE)) AND (PRD>=(19900101) AND PRD<=(20030528)) AND UC=(370/328 OR 370/338 OR 370/352 OR 370/400) AND PRC=(US); 3 ALL=((WWAN OR (wireless NEAR2 wide NEAR2 area NEAR2 network) OR CDMA OR (code NEAR2 division NEAR2 Multiple NEAR2 access)) NEAR15 (WLAN OR (Wireless NEAR2 local NEAR2 area NEAR2 network) OR IEEE)) AND (PRD>=(19900101) AND PRD<=(20030528)) AND EC=( T04W008404 OR T04W008412) AND PRC=(US); 4 ALL=((WWAN OR (wireless NEAR2 wide NEAR2 area NEAR2 network) OR CDMA OR (code NEAR2 division NEAR2 Multiple NEAR2 access)) NEAR15 (WLAN OR (Wireless NEAR2 local NEAR2 area NEAR2 network) OR IEEE)) AND (PRD>=(19900101) AND PRD<=(20030528)) AND EC=( T04W008404 OR T04W008412) AND PRC=(US); Novelty determination & File wrapper review: Novelty was determined based on specification and file wrapper analysis. The novelty point was determined by the argument made by applicant against the office action dated January 3, 2002. The argument was made against U.S. Patent No. 5,870,432 in which the applicant said “Kerchove fails to disclose the claimed invention because nothing in Kerchove teaches comparing the set of eigenvalues to
  3. 3. analystoserve@gmail.com  threshold values characterizing an acceptable transfer function of a transmission line.
  4. 4. analystoserve@gmail.com  Claim Mapping: Result 1 US 7,254,119 US 20040125812 Interworking mechanism between CDMA2000 and WLAN Adapter For Internetworking WWAN and WLAN March 28, 2003 December 25, 2002 1. A wireless communication system, comprising: a wireless wide area network (WWAN) having base transceiver stations spatially distributed to communicate with mobile communication devices via WWAN radio links, base station controllers each coupled to a plurality of base transceiver stations, and a data communication system comprising (1) packet control function devices respectively connected to said base station controllers to transmit data packets to and from the mobile communication devices via said base transceiver stations, and (2) a packet data serving node connected to said packet control function devices and a packet data network to provide packet data services to the mobile communication devices; Please refer to FIG. 1. FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram of an adapter 16 for internetworking the WLAN 14 and the WWAN 10. The adapter 16 is capable of being set up in the mobile WWLAN, such as in buses, airplanes, trains, and other large vehicles. The adapter is equivalent to an access point capable of transmitting and receiving data in the WLAN 14, and the specification of the data flow in the WWLAN 14 has to conform to an IEEE 802.11a/b/g specification. There are a plurality of mobile clients 18, such as passengers with mobile communication apparatus in large vehicles. The mobile clients 18 can connect to the WLAN 14 anywhere and anytime in the vehicles. The adapter 16 according to the present invention in the vehicles is not only an access point in the WLAN 14 but is also capable of internetworking the WLAN 14 and the WWAN 10. There are a plurality of radio ports 12 (RPs) for connecting the WWAN 10 and the adapter 16. The radio ports 12 can communicate with a radio port controller unit (RPCU), which controls the radio ports 12, receives signals from the radio ports 12, transmits the signals to the radio ports 12, and is capable of associating with the radio ports in the WWAN 10. In FIG. 1, the data transmission in the WWAN 10 can be achieved by a satellite system and the format of the data transmission has to conform to the standard specification of the WWAN, such as GSM, GPRS, and 3G specifications. In addition, the radio port controller unit 12 connects to a widespread communication network, like the internet, the telephone network, and so on. (see page 2, paragraph 17) a wireless local area network (WLAN) having at least one access point (AP) that communicates with a mobile communication device located in an access area via WLAN radio links, and an access point gateway connected between said AP and said packet data serving node to allow for continuity of a packet data service to said mobile communication device by switching a packet data service connection for said mobile communication device between said WLAN and said WWAN; Please refer to FIG. 1. FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram of an adapter 16 for internetworking the WLAN 14 and the WWAN 10. The adapter 16 is capable of being set up in the mobile WWLAN, such as in buses, airplanes, trains, and other large vehicles. The adapter is equivalent to an access point capable of transmitting and receiving data in the WLAN 14, and the specification of the data flow in the WWLAN 14 has to conform to an IEEE 802.11a/b/g specification. There are a plurality of mobile clients 18, such as passengers with mobile communication apparatus in large vehicles. The mobile clients 18 can connect to the WLAN 14 anywhere and anytime in the vehicles. The adapter 16 according to the present invention in the vehicles is not only an access point in the WLAN 14 but is also capable of internetworking the WLAN 14 and the WWAN 10. There are a plurality of radio ports 12 (RPs) for connecting the WWAN 10 and the adapter 16. The radio ports 12 can communicate with a radio port controller unit (RPCU), which controls the radio ports 12, receives signals from the radio ports 12, transmits the signals to the radio ports 12, and is capable of associating with the radio ports in
  5. 5. analystoserve@gmail.com  the WWAN 10. In FIG. 1, the data transmission in the WWAN 10 can be achieved by a satellite system and the format of the data transmission has to conform to the standard specification of the WWAN, such as GSM, GPRS, and 3G specifications. In addition, the radio port controller unit 12 connects to a widespread communication network, like the internet, the telephone network, and so on. (see page 2, paragraph 17) and a mechanism for authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) common to said WWAN and said WLAN. ---
  6. 6. analystoserve@gmail.com  Claim Mapping: Result 2 US 7,254,119 US 7,782,848 Interworking mechanism between CDMA2000 and WLAN Method and apparatus for converging local area and wide area wireless data networks March 28, 2003 June 18, 2001 1. A wireless communication system, comprising: a wireless wide area network (WWAN) having base transceiver stations spatially distributed to communicate with mobile communication devices via WWAN radio links, base station controllers each coupled to a plurality of base transceiver stations, and a data communication system comprising (1) packet control function devices respectively connected to said base station controllers to transmit data packets to and from the mobile communication devices via said base transceiver stations, and (2) a packet data serving node connected to said packet control function devices and a packet data network to provide packet data services to the mobile communication devices; Session integration is another level or type of integration between the LAN and the WAN. Through this level of integration, seamless connectivity can be provided as a user moves from one network to the other. In other words, the user maintains a session, no matter what access mechanism he is using. A dual mode terminal that can dynamically switch between the two air interfaces can be used to provide session integration. (see column 5, lines 25 to 30) The 2.5 G GPRS network 8 architecture is typically managed by a cellular operator such as, e.g., AT&T Wireless. This network can support voice as well as data transactions. Mobile stations (MS) 10, which are also described herein as wireless client devices (such as, e.g., laptops, cell phones or PDAs with a GPRS NIC), connect to a base station (BS) 12. Multiple base stations 12 connect into a base station controller (BSC) 14. Voice traffic is sent from the BSC 14 to the Mobile Switching Center (MSC) 16. A Packet Control Unit (PCU) installed at the BSC 14 separates out data traffic coming from the MS 10. The data traffic is managed by the cellular operator's wireless data network. More, specifically, the data traffic goes to a SGSN (Serving GPRS Service Node) 18. A carrier's network typically has multiple SGSNs. The SGSNs authenticate mobile users by querying an HLR 20 (Home Location Register) database. The SGSN 18 is also responsible for managing traffic, and it routes data traffic over the carrier's GPRS network to a Gateway GPRS Service Node (GGSN) 22. The GGSN 22 is a border router which routes traffic to and from the GPRS network into the public Internet. As a user moves across cells, the user becomes associated with different SGSNs. The SGSNs are responsible for managing the mobility of the user. FIG. 1 shows specific interfaces between different elements of the WAN network 8. These interfaces are defined by the GPRS standard published by the ETSI and the 3GPP. (see column 5, lines 45 to 65) The lower portion of FIG. 1 shows the network architecture for local wireless LANs 24 deployed, e.g., in hot spot locations. As mentioned earlier, hotspots can be deployed at various locations such as, e.g., at airports, convention centers, and in the local coffee shops. Hotspots can be classified into two general categories: mini hotspots and mega hotspots. A mini hotspot is a relatively small deployment such as, e.g., in a
  7. 7. analystoserve@gmail.com  coffee shop. A mini hot spot deployment typically comprises a single wireless LAN 802.11 based access point (AP) 26 and provides connectivity into the Internet typically over a DSL, T1, or a leased line. A mega hotspot is a deployment that supports a set of access points and covers a moderate sized area such as, e.g., a convention center. Such a deployment typically has multiple APs connected through Ethernet switches and a router to the public Internet typically over a T1 or a leased line. (see column 6, lines 1 to 20) a wireless local area network (WLAN) having at least one access point (AP) that communicates with a mobile communication device located in an access area via WLAN radio links, and an access point gateway connected between said AP and said packet data serving node to allow for continuity of a packet data service to said mobile communication device by switching a packet data service connection for said mobile communication device between said WLAN and said WWAN; The lower portion of FIG. 1 shows the network architecture for local wireless LANs 24 deployed, e.g., in hot spot locations. As mentioned earlier, hotspots can be deployed at various locations such as, e.g., at airports, convention centers, and in the local coffee shops. Hotspots can be classified into two general categories: mini hotspots and mega hotspots. A mini hotspot is a relatively small deployment such as, e.g., in a coffee shop. A mini hot spot deployment typically comprises a single wireless LAN 802.11 based access point (AP) 26 and provides connectivity into the Internet typically over a DSL, T1, or a leased line. A mega hotspot is a deployment that supports a set of access points and covers a moderate sized area such as, e.g., a convention center. Such a deployment typically has multiple APs connected through Ethernet switches and a router to the public Internet typically over a T1 or a leased line. (see column 6, lines 5 to 20) and a mechanism for authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) common to said WWAN and said WLAN. One component of the AAA integration functionality is integrating billing information. Carriers can support an `all you can eat` type of billing model for hotspot usage, where the user is charged a flat fee and can access any amount of data. In this case, there is no special need to measure actual data usage. However, if the carrier is interested in determining the actual amount of data used, the type of service used, or duration, the CWG client can be enhanced to collect some of the billing information. Since the data may not all flow from the CWG, the client can measure this information. This information can be obtained by reading the packets transferred at the network interface. The traffic that flows through the actual carrier's network can be metered by the SGSN as normal GPRS traffic.
  8. 8. analystoserve@gmail.com  Claim Mapping: Result 3 US 7,254,119 US 7,356,015 Interworking mechanism between CDMA2000 and WLAN Data handoff method between wireless local area network and wireless wide area network March 28, 2003 May 02, 2003 1. A wireless communication system, comprising: a wireless wide area network (WWAN) having base transceiver stations spatially distributed to communicate with mobile communication devices via WWAN radio links, base station controllers each coupled to a plurality of base transceiver stations, and a data communication system comprising (1) packet control function devices respectively connected to said base station controllers to transmit data packets to and from the mobile communication devices via said base transceiver stations, and (2) a packet data serving node connected to said packet control function devices and a packet data network to provide packet data services to the mobile communication devices; The approach provides a mechanism seamlessly hand over a TCP- based data connection from a WLAN to a WWAN (or carrier cellular data network) and from a WWAN to a WLAN The approach supports data roaming that is not based on Mobile IP, and therefore does not necessarily assume that the mobile device has a permanent IP address with which it can be reached anywhere. Data handoff service can be accomplished in a loosely coupled manner without requiring a tight integration with the carrier network. (see column 3, lines 55 to 65) a wireless local area network (WLAN) having at least one access point (AP) that communicates with a mobile communication device located in an access area via WLAN radio links, and an access point gateway connected between said AP and said packet data serving node to allow for continuity of a packet data service to said mobile communication device by switching a packet data service connection for said mobile communication device between said WLAN and said WWAN; In a baseline network of a type described in the provisional patent application titled "Method of Seamless Roaming Between Wi-Fi Network and Cellular Network," when a subscriber with a dual mode mobile device is in a building controlled by the Cellular Controller, the device's default operation will be the 802.11 mode and therefore the cellular radio of the mobile device will be turned off. The Cellular Controller creates a proxy for the user's mobile device in the cellular carrier's network. This proxy authenticates the user on the cellular carrier's network and then sends and receives calls and data messages to and from the cellular carrier's network on behalf of the user. The Cellular Controller works with the Control Server in the enterprise's LAN to locate the user in the building and to determine which 802.11 Access Point is serving the user. When the Cellular Controller receives a voice call from the cellular carrier network that is destined for a mobile device it is proxying for, it uses the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP)-based voice over IP (VoIP) to forward the call via the corporate LAN to the mobile
  9. 9. analystoserve@gmail.com  device. Similarly, voice and data messages that originate at the mobile device operating in 802.11 WLAN mode use SIP to set up a call to the Cellular Controller, if it is intended to be transmitted out of the building over the cellular carrier's network. The device then uses VoIP over WLAN to transmit the voice packets over the wireless LAN infrastructure where it is received by the Access Point and forwarded to the Cellular Controller over the wired LAN infrastructure. The Cellular Controller converts the packet into the right format for transmission over the cellular network. (see column 4, lines 55 to 65) and a mechanism for authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) common to said WWAN and said WLAN. ---
  10. 10. analystoserve@gmail.com  Claim Mapping: Result 4 US 7,254,119 US 20040133806 Interworking mechanism between CDMA2000 and WLAN Integration of a Wireless Local Area Network and a Packet Data Network March 28, 2003 October 10, 2002 1. A wireless communication system, comprising: a wireless wide area network (WWAN) having base transceiver stations spatially distributed to communicate with mobile communication devices via WWAN radio links, base station controllers each coupled to a plurality of base transceiver stations, and a data communication system comprising (1) packet control function devices respectively connected to said base station controllers to transmit data packets to and from the mobile communication devices via said base transceiver stations, and (2) a packet data serving node connected to said packet control function devices and a packet data network to provide packet data services to the mobile communication devices; [0031] Reference is now made to FIG. 2, which is flow chart that shows a method for integrating the WLAN 202 and the 3G WWAN 201 in accordance to the invention and further to FIG. 3, which is a signal flow diagram illustrating a flow of messages for integrating the WLAN 202 and a 3G WWAN 201 in accordance to the invention. [0028] Reference is now made to FIG. 1, which illustrates a Multiple Access Environment 200 that integrates a Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN) 202 and a Third Generation (3G) Wireless Wide Area Network (WWAN) 201 in accordance to the invention. The 3G WWAN 201 is a packet data network such as for example a Code Division Multiple Access 2000 (CDMA2000) network. In the Multi Access Environment 200, a terminal 204 may roam back and forth from the WLAN 202 to the 3G WWAN 201 and vice versa. The terminal 204 is registered in the 3G WWAN 201 and operable in both the WLAN 202 and in the 3G WWAN 201. The terminal 204 can be for example a mobile telephone, a Personal Data Application (PDA), a laptop computer or desktop computer equipped with an access card. It is assumed that the terminal 204 is Simple IP capable and Mobile IP capable. Mobile IP and Simple IP access are well known in the art and are defined by Third Partnership Project 2 (3GPP2) standards. (see page 2, paragraph 2 and 3) a wireless local area network (WLAN) having at least one access point (AP) that communicates with a mobile communication device located in an access area via WLAN radio links, and an access point gateway connected between said AP and said packet data serving node to allow for continuity of a packet data service to said mobile communication device by switching a packet data service connection for said mobile communication [0013] sending a Service Request message from a terminal to an Access Point (AP); [0029] The terminal 204 is granted access to the WLAN 202 via at least one of possibly many APs 206. The AP 206 acts as an authenticator for the terminal 204 in the WLAN 202. The AP 206 is responsible for receiving signals from the terminal 204 and sending signals to the terminal 204 on an Internet Protocol (IP) connection over an air interface. The AP 206 is connected via an IP connection 218 to a WLAN Serving Node (WSN) 208, which comprises a Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service (RADIUS) proxy capability 209 for access control and charging purposes that is connected via 230 with a RADIUS client 215 for sending RADIUS messages. The WSN 208 can be used as a gateway responsible for managing IP services and for maintaining session information for the terminal 204. The invention supports basic RADIUS accounting requirements as defined in Internet
  11. 11. analystoserve@gmail.com  device between said WLAN and said WWAN; Engineering Task Force (IETF) RFC 2138, which is included herewith by reference. (see page 2, paragraph 13 and 29) and a mechanism for authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) common to said WWAN and said WLAN. [0035] However, if the terminal 204 is authorized the H-AAA 210 responds to the RADIUS Authentication Request message 412 with a RADIUS Accept Response message 414 (step 336). Upon reception of the message 414, the WSN 208 starts counters for accounting for the IP session (step 340) and may send this information to the H-AAA 210. At step 344, this information is sent to the H-AAA 210 based on a common single billing scheme that cover all access types (WLAN and 3G WWAN). The Multi-Access Environment 200 allows operators and/or users to configure their subscription with either different or common billing schemes, depending on the access type used (WLAN or 3G WWAN). Consequently, the billing may be based on time, duration, and volume of packet data downloaded or destination type. (see page 3, paragraph 35)
  12. 12. analystoserve@gmail.com  Claim Mapping: Result 5 US 7,254,119 US 20090310586 Interworking mechanism between CDMA2000 and WLAN Cooperative Wireless Networks March 28, 2003 November 22, 2000 1. A wireless communication system, comprising: a wireless wide area network (WWAN) having base transceiver stations spatially distributed to communicate with mobile communication devices via WWAN radio links, base station controllers each coupled to a plurality of base transceiver stations, and a data communication system comprising (1) packet control function devices respectively connected to said base station controllers to transmit data packets to and from the mobile communication devices via said base transceiver stations, and (2) a packet data serving node connected to said packet control function devices and a packet data network to provide packet data services to the mobile communication devices; [0014] Some of the exemplary embodiments of the present invention are summarized as follows. Embodiments of the invention include beam-forming systems configured to enable spatially separated wireless terminals (WTs) to perform beam-forming operations in a wireless wide area network (WWAN). A wireless local area network (WLAN) couples together the WTs, which may be configured to share WWAN data, access, and control information. A beam- forming system may comprise the WTs, which function as elements of an antenna array. WWAN network access functions (such as monitoring control channels and exchanging control messages with the WWAN) may be provided in a centralized or a distributed manner with respect to the WTs. [0117] FIG. 2B illustrates an embodiment of the invention including a plurality M of WTs 1109.1-1109.M, each comprising a corresponding combination of a WWAN Interface 1101.1-1101.M, an optional WWAN baseband processor 1102.1-1102.M, a combiner (such as a MIMO combiner 1103.1-1103.M), and a secondary data processor 1104.1-1104.M. The WTs 1109.1-1109.M are coupled together by a WLAN 1105, which is configured to convey data between the WTs 1109.1-1109.M in order to enable cooperative antenna-array processing. (see page 1 and 2, paragraph 14 and 17) a wireless local area network (WLAN) having at least one access point (AP) that communicates with a mobile communication device located in an access area via WLAN radio links, and an access point gateway connected between said AP and said packet data serving node to allow for continuity of a packet data service to said mobile communication device by switching a packet data service connection for said mobile communication device between said WLAN and said WWAN; [0054] FIG. 11 shows a WWAN comprising a WWAN access point (e.g., a base station) and a local group comprising a plurality of wireless terminals communicatively coupled together via a WLAN. A network-management operator is configured to handle WWAN- control operations within the local group. (see page 3, paragraph 54)
  13. 13. analystoserve@gmail.com  and a mechanism for authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) common to said WWAN and said WLAN. ---
  14. 14. analystoserve@gmail.com  Claim Mapping: Result 6 US 7,254,119 US 20070270145 Interworking mechanism between CDMA2000 and WLAN Systems and Methods for Seamlessly Roaming Between a Wireless Wide Area Network and a Wireless Local Area Network March 28, 2003 May 09, 2003 1. A wireless communication system, comprising: a wireless wide area network (WWAN) having base transceiver stations spatially distributed to communicate with mobile communication devices via WWAN radio links, base station controllers each coupled to a plurality of base transceiver stations, and a data communication system comprising (1) packet control function devices respectively connected to said base station controllers to transmit data packets to and from the mobile communication devices via said base transceiver stations, and (2) a packet data serving node connected to said packet control function devices and a packet data network to provide packet data services to the mobile communication devices; [0019] FIG. 3 illustrates a method 20 for seamlessly roaming between a WWAN and a WLAN, according to one embodiment of the invention. When a party enters into a hotspot, the user agent of this party's mobile terminal will detect the types of wireless services available. When the party tries to make a call, the user agent of this calling party's mobile terminal will make a call via a WWAN in a conventional way, using the MSISDN (Mobile Station International ISDN Number) of a called mobile terminal (steps S22 and S26). After the WWAN call is properly set up, the user agent of the calling mobile terminal will decide which radio interface to use based on the user profile of the calling party. If a WLAN is preferred, and the WLAN interface is available, the user agent will send extra information including a handover request together with information about the IP address, user profile, etc. of the calling mobile terminal to the called mobile terminal for handing over the call to the WLAN (step S32). The extra information is transferred using the short message service (SMS) or the watermarking technology. The watermarking technology allows the extra information to be hidden within the voice, as will be described later. (see page 2, paragraph 19) a wireless local area network (WLAN) having at least one access point (AP) that communicates with a mobile communication device located in an access area via WLAN radio links, and an access point gateway connected between said AP and said packet data serving node to allow for continuity of a packet data service to said mobile communication device by switching a packet data service connection for said mobile communication device between said WLAN and said WWAN; ---
  15. 15. analystoserve@gmail.com  and a mechanism for authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) common to said WWAN and said WLAN. ---
  16. 16. analystoserve@gmail.com  Claim Mapping: Result 7 US 7,254,119 US 8,107,496 Interworking mechanism between CDMA2000 and WLAN System and method for roaming between wireless networks March 28, 2003 January 28, 2002 1. A wireless communication system, comprising: a wireless wide area network (WWAN) having base transceiver stations spatially distributed to communicate with mobile communication devices via WWAN radio links, base station controllers each coupled to a plurality of base transceiver stations, and a data communication system comprising (1) packet control function devices respectively connected to said base station controllers to transmit data packets to and from the mobile communication devices via said base transceiver stations, and (2) a packet data serving node connected to said packet control function devices and a packet data network to provide packet data services to the mobile communication devices; The exemplary systems and methods of the present invention provide many advantages that are readily apparent from the above detailed description. For example, these systems and methods utilize open standards, such as IEE 802.3, IEE 802.11, PPP, PPPoE, CDMA2000, and GPRS/UMTS. Similarly, the exemplary systems and methods of the present invention utilize stock components, with little or no modifications, that are already in use (or at least standardized) within known wireless access technology (e.g., wireless Ethernet, CDMA, and GSM). Consequently, the present invention may be integrated without difficulty into the existing infrastructure used with such wireless access technology. (see column 12, lines 45 to 55) In the system 10, the mobile node 12 uses wireless Ethernet (i.e., IEEE 802.11) to communicate with the access point 14, which in turn transparently bridges the wireless Ethernet communication to a wireline Ethernet communication with the control server 20. For purposes of the present application, a reference to wireless Ethernet includes IEEE 802.11, a reference to wireline Ethernet includes IEEE 802.3, and a reference to just Ethernet includes both wireless and wireline Ethernet. After receiving the wireline Ethernet communication, the control server 20 translates the communication from Ethernet to a wireless communication technology, such as CDMA or GSM, and communicates with the first serving node 30 using the wireless communication technology. It should be understood that for purposes of the present application, although wireless Ethernet may be defined as a wireless communication technology, reference to a wireless communication technology herein is reserved for cellular technology such as CDMA or GSM (including all of their standard communication protocols). (see column, lines 35 to 50) a wireless local area network (WLAN) having at least one access point (AP) that communicates with a mobile communication device located in an access area via WLAN radio links, and an access point gateway connected between said AP and said packet data serving node to allow for continuity of a packet data service to said Next, the first serving node 30 may communicate with the HA 50 across the network 40 (e.g., the Internet). Alternatively, the first serving node 30 may transfer its communication to the second serving node 80 via a serving node to serving node interface link (e.g., a P-P interface link or corresponding GSM interface link). Communication from the HA 50 to the mobile node 12 via the first serving node 30 flows in a similar, albeit reverse, manner. (see column 3, lines 50 to 60)
  17. 17. analystoserve@gmail.com  mobile communication device by switching a packet data service connection for said mobile communication device between said WLAN and said WWAN; and a mechanism for authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) common to said WWAN and said WLAN. ---
  18. 18. analystoserve@gmail.com  Claim Mapping: Result 8 US 7,254,119 US 20080075033 Interworking mechanism between CDMA2000 and WLAN Cooperative beam‐forming in wireless networks  March 28, 2003 November 22, 2000 1. A wireless communication system, comprising: a wireless wide area network (WWAN) having base transceiver stations spatially distributed to communicate with mobile communication devices via WWAN radio links, base station controllers each coupled to a plurality of base transceiver stations, and a data communication system comprising (1) packet control function devices respectively connected to said base station controllers to transmit data packets to and from the mobile communication devices via said base transceiver stations, and (2) a packet data serving node connected to said packet control function devices and a packet data network to provide packet data services to the mobile communication devices; [0098] FIG. 1G illustrates a cooperative beam-forming embodiment of the invention that functions in the presence of a desired WWAN terminal 119 and an external interference source (or jammer) 118. WTs 101-103 in a WLAN group 110 may coordinate their received aggregate beam pattern(s) to null out a jamming signal 115. Array- processing operations performed on signals received from the WTs 101-103 may take the form of phased-array processing, which minimizes the array's sensitivity to signals arriving from one or more angles. Alternatively, array processing may employ baseband (or intermediate-frequency) interference cancellation. Similarly, beam- forming operations may be employed to cancel emissions transmitted toward one or more terminals (such as jammer 118). (see column 7, paragraph 98) a wireless local area network (WLAN) having at least one access point (AP) that communicates with a mobile communication device located in an access area via WLAN radio links, and an access point gateway connected between said AP and said packet data serving node to allow for continuity of a packet data service to said mobile communication device by switching a packet data service connection for said mobile communication device between said WLAN and said WWAN; [0205] FIG. 11 shows a WWAN comprising a WWAN access point (e.g., a base station) 2120 and a local group 2100 comprising a plurality of wireless terminals (WTs) 2101-2104 communicatively coupled together via a WLAN 2105. A network-management operator 2106 is configured to handle WWAN-control operations within the local group 2100. In an exemplary embodiment, the network-management operator 2106 is coupled to at least one of the WTs 2101-2104 (e.g., WT 2103). One or more of the WTs 2101- 2104 may be configured to transmit and/or receive WWAN communication signals, such as WWAN traffic channels 2110 and WWAN control messages 2111. Signals in the WWAN traffic channels 2110 may be processed by one or more of the WTs 2101- 2104, which may include at least one local area network controller (e.g., 2103). The WWAN control messages 2111 are processed by the network-management operator 2106. (see page 20, column 205)
  19. 19. analystoserve@gmail.com  and a mechanism for authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) common to said WWAN and said WLAN. [0280] A network-management operator may employ an authentication protocol to authenticate traffic between a base station and a MT. For example, a network-management operator may identify a particular WT in a local group to a base station. The base station may then verify that the WT has a legitimate subscription record with a service provider that utilizes the WWAN. Upon verification, the base station allows access to the air interface and the network-management operator (whose responsibilities may be transferred to the WT) signs access channel packets to prove it is the true owner of the session. In one exemplary embodiment of the invention, the WT and/or the network-management operator may use IS-856 Air Interface Authentication. (see page 24, paragraph 28) ---End of Document---

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