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Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013
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Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High Speed Systems - VE2013

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Frequency synthesis and clock generation are now key elements in all aspects of high speed data acquisition and RF design. In this session, the primary types of frequency synthesizers—phase-locked …

Frequency synthesis and clock generation are now key elements in all aspects of high speed data acquisition and RF design. In this session, the primary types of frequency synthesizers—phase-locked loops (PLL) and direct digital synthesizers (DDS)—are discussed, along with the applications for when each is appropriate. Also covered are detailed aspects of synthesizer design. Other applications, such as clock distribution and translation are addressed, and problems associated with poor clocking are identified. Examples of poor clocking are shown, along with the results of doing it properly.

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  • 1. Analog Design Conference 2013 Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation Advanced Techniques of Higher Performance Signal Processing David Kress and Mike Curtin
  • 2. Legal Disclaimer  Notice of proprietary information, Disclaimers and Exclusions Of Warranties The ADI Presentation is the property of ADI. All copyright, trademark, and other intellectual property and proprietary rights in the ADI Presentation and in the software, text, graphics, design elements, audio and all other materials originated or used by ADI herein (the "ADI Information") are reserved to ADI and its licensors. The ADI Information may not be reproduced, published, adapted, modified, displayed, distributed or sold in any manner, in any form or media, without the prior written permission of ADI. THE ADI INFORMATION AND THE ADI PRESENTATION ARE PROVIDED "AS IS". WHILE ADI INTENDS THE ADI INFORMATION AND THE ADI PRESENTATION TO BE ACCURATE, NO WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND ARE MADE WITH RESPECT TO THE ADI PRESENTATION AND THE ADI INFORMATION, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION ANY WARRANTIES OF ACCURACY OR COMPLETENESS. TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS AND OTHER INACCURACIES OR MISTAKES ARE POSSIBLE. ADI DOES NOT WARRANT THAT THE ADI INFORMATION AND THE ADI PRESENTATION WILL MEET YOUR REQUIREMENTS, WILL BE ACCURATE, OR WILL BE UNINTERRUPTED OR ERROR FREE. ADI EXPRESSLY EXCLUDES AND DISCLAIMS ALL EXPRESS AND IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NON-INFRINGEMENT OF ANY THIRD PARTY INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS. ADI SHALL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY DAMAGE OR LOSS OF ANY KIND ARISING OUT OF OR RELATED TO YOUR USE OF THE ADI INFORMATION AND THE ADI PRESENTATION, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION DATA LOSS OR CORRUPTION, COMPUTER VIRUSES, ERRORS, OMISSIONS, INTERRUPTIONS, DEFECTS OR OTHER FAILURES, REGARDLESS OF WHETHER SUCH LIABILITY IS BASED IN TORT, CONTRACT OR OTHERWISE. USE OF ANY THIRD-PARTY SOFTWARE REFERENCED WILL BE GOVERNED BY THE APPLICABLE LICENSE AGREEMENT, IF ANY, WITH SUCH THIRD PARTY. 2
  • 3. 3 Today’s Agenda Applications areas for clocks and frequency synthesis Design and application of phase-locked loops (PLLs) Design and application of direct digital synthesis (DDS) Clock generation and distribution Issues of clocking data converters
  • 4. 4 What is a clock and what are the common frequencies?  Unlike a data waveform, a clock signal is a square wave whose frequency is usually constant.  Common frequencies include:  1 pps (pulse per second) used by GPS  8 kHz (commonly used in wired communcations) and is commonly referred to as a BITS clock  32.768 kHz is the common watch crystal oscillator  19.44 MHz is a common reference clock in synchronous optical (SONET) networks, and is still used in OTU (Optical Transport Unit) networks that are replacing SONET  122.88 MHz is commonly used in wireless communications  125 and 156.25 MHz are common Ethernet reference clocks
  • 5. 5 Clock Sources  General oscillators  Crystal oscillators  Voltage-controlled oscillators (VCO)  Phase Locked Loops (PLLs)  Analog PLLs  Uses an analog multiplier as the phase detector  Not in Wide Use  Digital PLLs  Use a digital phase frequency detector (PFD), analog loop filter, voltage controlled oscillator (VCO)  Simple architecture  Very high performance and low noise  All-Digital PLLs  Use a digital phase frequency detector (PFD), digital loop filter, NCO  Increased flexibility for faster locking  Excellent jitter cleaning  Extremely flexible  Direct Digital Synthesis  Extremely flexible frequency generation  Very fast frequency sweeping and hopping  Very popular in military and instrumentation applications
  • 6. 3.6 Basic Phase Locked Loop (PLL) Model (B) STANDARD NEGATIVE FEEDBACK CONTROL SYSTEM MODEL (A) PLL MODEL ERROR DETECTOR LOOP FILTER VCO FEEDBACK DIVIDER PHASE DETECTOR CHARGE PUMP FO = N FREF
  • 7. 7 Digital PLL Block Diagram
  • 8. 3.8 Phase/Frequency Detector (PFD) Driving a Charge Pump (CP) D1 Q1 CLR1 CLR2 D2 Q2 V+ V− HI HI +IN −IN DELAY UP DOWN CP OUT I I U1 U2 U3 PFD CP D1 Q1 CLR1 CLR2 D2 Q2 V+ V− HI HI +IN −IN DELAY UP DOWN CP OUT I I U1 U2 U3 PFD CP (A) OUT OF FREQUENCY LOCK AND PHASE LOCK (B) IN FREQUENCY LOCK, BUT SLIGHTLY OUT OF PHASE LOCK 0 +I +I 0 (A) OUT OF FREQUENCY LOCK AND PHASE LOCK (B) IN FREQUENCY LOCK, BUT SLIGHTLY OUT OF PHASE LOCK 0 +I +I 0 UP 1 0 0 DOWN 0 1 0 CP OUT + I −I 0 UP 1 0 0 DOWN 0 1 0 CP OUT + I −I 0 (C) IN FREQUENCY LOCK AND PHASE LOCK
  • 9. 3.9 Adding an Input Reference Divider and a Prescaler to the Basic PLL (A) (B)
  • 10. All-Digital PLL Detailed Block Diagram (AD9557 Shown) 10 SPI/I2C SERIAL PORT EEPROM REF MONITORING AUTOMATIC SWITCHING ÷N1 ÷N2 ÷N3 ÷2 ÷M0 OUT0 OUT0 OUT1 OUT1 10-BIT INTEGER DIVIDERS MAX 1.25GHz ÷M1 ×2 ×2 LF PFD/CP RF DIVIDER 1 ÷3 TO ÷11 XO OR XTAL XO FREQUENCIES 10MHz TO 180MHz XTAL: 10MHz TO 50MHz RF DIVIDER 2 ÷3 TO ÷11 FOUT = 360kHz TO 1.25GHz INTEGER DIVIDER OUTPUT PLL (APLL) FRAC1/ MOD1 17-BIT INTEGER 24b/24b RESOLUTION DIGITAL PLL (DPLL) ÷2 REGISTER SPACE 2kHzTO1.25GHz R DIVIDER (20-BIT) SYNC RESET PINCONTROL M0 M1 M2 M3 IRQ SPI/I2C DIGITAL LOOP FILTER TUNING WORD CLAMP AND HISTORY FREERUN TW PLL2 STATUS LF CAP PFD/CP LF 3.34GHz TO 4.05GHz DPFD 30-BITNCO ROM AND FSM MULTI-FUNCTION I/O PINS (CONTROL AND STATUS READ BACK) SYSTEM CLOCK MULTIPLIER ÷2 AD9557 REFA REFA REFB REFB 09197-135 All-Digital PLL Core Digital PLL
  • 11. 3.11 Integer-N Compared to Fractional-N Synthesizer REF DIVIDER R PFD FILTER VCO N COUNTER FREF F1 FOUT 10MHz R =50 0.2MHz N = 4501 900.2MHz REF DIVIDER R PFD FILTER VCO "N" COUNTER FREF F1 FOUT 10MHz R =10 1MHz 900.2MHz N =900.2 "N" = NINTEGER + NFRACTION NMODULUS = 900 + NFRACTION 5 FOUT = FREF×(N/R) (A) INTEGER N (B) FRACTIONAL N
  • 12. 3.12 Key PLL Specifications RF Input Frequency (Minimum/Maximum) Phase Noise and Phase Jitter Reference Spurs Frequency Lock Time Output Frequency Error Phase Lock Time Output Phase Error Loop Bandwidth and Phase Margin
  • 13. 13 Common Uses for PLLs  Frequency translation  Jitter Cleanup  Redundant clocking  Holdover  Clock Distribution
  • 14. /2 REFA 19.44 MHz /R1 Phase Freq Det (PFD) 10 kHz< FPFD < 50MHz Charge Pump Loop Filter (External) VCO /4 or 5/B 156.25 MHz Feedback Divider (N Divider) /P/2 /R2 Reference Monitor and control Logic REFB REF FLAG VCO div 14 Frequency Translation Example: 19.44 MHz (SONET) to 156.25 MHz (10 Gb/s Ethernet):  R divider=162, B=15625, VCO divider = 3, P divider = 4  Phase detector frequency: 120 kHz  VCO frequency: 1875 MHz
  • 15. 15 Jitter Clean-up Clean signal from main clock board Backplane has lots of noise sources Clock received by line card is contaminated Clock received from back plane is used to establish phase and frequency of the output Signal purity of the output is dependent upon the Local oscillator (Crystal, TCXO, or OCXO) used HOW? Digital PLL w/ a Programmable Digital loop Filter capable of <1 Hz BW
  • 16. Switchover and Holdover Holdover: Holdover is the ability to provide output signals even when the reference input disappears. Holdover can be initiated either as directed by controller/processor elements in a system, or via a provided monitoring function which will automatically switch into holdover mode when the reference input goes quiet. Switchover: Switchover provides additional security beyond the holdover function. If one of the references fails, the clock device will use one of the alternate references instead. An important aspect of all the switchover functions provided in ADI clock devices is that no runt pulses and no extra long pulses result from this change. Downstream PLLs will not lose lock as a result, of or during, switchover - even when no predefined relationship exists between the phases of the various reference input signals. Switchover can be initiated either as directed by controller/processor elements in a system, or via a provided monitoring function which will automatically implement switchover when the active reference input goes quiet.
  • 17. Switchover, Synchronization, and Holdover NOTE output is synchronized to primary reference But what happens when the primary reference disappears? The PLL will maintain the output clock in holdover until another reference input is available. The output phase may or may not slew (depending on the application) so that either the input-output phase is the maintained or there is no output clock phase slewing. AD9548
  • 18. 3.18 TOOLS – Design, Simulation, Evaluation  Full Range of Evaluation Boards for DDS, Clock Generation and Distribution, PLLs Available. Full suite of Windows-Compatible Software Available http://www.analog.com/en/evaluation-boards-kits/resources/index.html http://www.analog.com/en/rf-tools/topic.html http://ez.analog.com/welcome
  • 19. 3.19 CLK Design and Simulation Software www.analog.com/adisimclk
  • 20. 3.20 PLL Design and Simulation Software VERSION 3.5 www.analog.com/adisimpll
  • 21. 3.21 DDS Design Tool - ADIsimDDS www.analog.com/adisimdds
  • 22. Forums in 22 Get fast answers to new questions Search existing content for immediate answers http://ez.analog.com/community/dds http://ez.analog.com/community/clock_and_timing http://ez.analog.com/community/rf
  • 23. Clocking Applications for Phase-locked Loops (PLLs)
  • 24. 24 Clocking Application – Wireless Transceiver Card ADC TRX Clock Distribution IC ADC ADC ADC DDC or ASIC DAC DUC or FPGA DAC User’s Reference Clock Clock to A-D Converters Clock to D-A Converters Clock to Digital Chips Critical Clock Functions on Transceiver Card: • clean-up jitter on user’s input reference • up-convert user reference frequency to highest frequency needed, usually driven by DAC clock requirements • generate multiple frequencies for RX & TX • provide low jitter clocks for converters • generate mix of LVPECL, LVDS, CMOS clocks • adjust phase or delay between clock channels • offer isolation between clock channels TRX Cards
  • 25. 25 Digital Cross Point Clock Generation/ Distribution Power Sequencing Line Card Switch Card XCVR CDR SERDES Backplane Switch & EQ Digital Engine Optical Transceiver TIA LDD PIN Laser Limiting AMP Signal Conditioner Clocking Application – Line Card Switch Card Line Card Backplane New ADI clock products such as the AD9557 and AD9548 are tailored for network applications. Specific AD9548 example on next page
  • 26. SyncE / IEEE1588 Hybrid (with Hooks for Pure IEEE1588) Backplane Line Card AD9557 AD9547 TCXO / OCXO Recovered clocks from Line cards BITS GPS Timing Card XO AD9553/7 (Optional) Tx Rx CPU / FPGA / DSP IEEE1588 Protocol / Algorithm SPI/I2C MAC/PHY SyncE Clock Recovering + IEEE1588 Time Stamp Time Stamps Frequency Synchronization 1 PPS Timing Card 2 Line Card n Time of Day Offset Adjustment 1 PPS Time of Day Clock/Frequency Control AD9548
  • 27. Using DDS For Clock Generation
  • 28. 28 Generating Clocks using DDS Limiter Reconstruction Filter Fsysclock(fc) DAC out Filter out Clock out Ideal Time Domain Response Ideal Frequency Domain Response "Real World" Frequency Response t 0 1 1 3 5 7 Odd harmonic series 1 3 5 7 t t f ff fff fc fc 2fc 2fc DDS The DDS chip can synchronize to a user’s reference. An on-chip clock multiplier can generate the fast clock needed to clock the NCO/DAC. A frequency tuning word may be written to set the output clock rate. External filtering removes unwanted images. A squaring function then converts sine wave to square wave.
  • 29. 3.29 A Flexible DDS System fc SERIAL OR BYTE LOAD REGISTER nn FREQUENCY CONTROL PHASE REGISTER LPF DAC PARALLEL DELTA PHASE REGISTER M CLOCK n n PHASE ACCUMULATOR n PHASE TRUNCATION 12-19 BITS AMPLITUDE TRUNCATION 2n =fo M • fc N-BITS n = 24 - 48 BITS PHASE-TO AMPLITUDE CONVERTER M = TUNING WORD SYSTEM CLOCK (10-14) 6-bit phase wheel 0 1 2 3 4 63 0 2 4 31 29 …… 5-bit amplitude resolution fo vector data raw DDS-DAC output filtered output compared output
  • 30. 3.30 Signal Flow Through the DDS Architecture REFERENCE CLOCK PHASE ACCUMULATOR (n-BITS) PHASE-TO-AMPLITUDE CONVERTER DAC M TUNING WORD SPECIFIES OUTPUT FREQUENCY AS A FRACTION OF REFERENCE CLOCK FREQUENCY IN DIGITAL DOMAIN ANALOG N DDS CIRCUITRY (NCO) TO FILTER 2n =fo M • fc 2n =fo M • fc fc M = JUMP SIZE
  • 31. 3.31 AD9858 1GSPS DDS with Phase Detector and Multiplier
  • 32. 3.32 DDS Single Loop Upconversion Using the AD9858 DDS 1GHz DAC 1032 LPF DIVIDER 1/2/4 PHASE/ FREQUENCY DETECTOR 150MHz CHARGE PUMP 0.5mA-2mA 0.5mA STEPS LOOP FILTER ~ DIVIDER K DC - 400MHz VCO f = K× fREF DDS/DAC CLOCK FREQUENCY TUNING WORD PART OF AD9858: fREF DC - 150MHz
  • 33. DDS vs. PLL Comparing: Advantage The rest of the story Freq. Resolution DDS Fractional N PLLs shrink the gap, Programmable Modulus improves DDS precision Freq. Agility DDS Fast hopping PLLs shrink the gap Phase Resolution & Agility DDS Digital PLLs can provide some level of phase control. Amplitude Resolution & Agility DDS Power Consumption PLL Gap shrinks with geometry; interleaved cores Output Frequency Range PLL Price PLL* Gap shrinks with geometry; in no small part this is due to the breadth of adoption of PLL technology, Broad Spectral Purity PLL Ancillary circuitry PLL Freq. Up-conversion PLL Super Nyquist operation and hybrids 33
  • 34. Hybrid configurations DDSRefCLK PLL Upconverting PLL DDSRefCLK PLL RefCLK multipying PLL PLL DDS RefCLK DDS in feedback path PLL DDS RefCLK DDS as a DCO 34
  • 35. Clocking Data Converters
  • 36. 36 Clocking Data Converters Absolute accuracy needed for reproduction  CD sound output would be off-tune Clock jitter leads to distortion
  • 37. Effective Aperture Delay Time Measured with Respect to ADC Input SAMPLING CLOCK ANALOG INPUT SINEWAVE ZERO CROSSING +FS -FS 0V +te –te te ' ' '
  • 38. 38 Jitter – common noise source introduced at SHA in A-D Converter Clock jitter is the sample to sample variation in the encode clock (both the external jitter as well as the internal jitter). Fullscale SNR is jitter-limited by:  See AN-501 and AN-756 SHA = Sample & Hold Amplifier         =      = jitterrms rms jitter ftN S SNR π2 1 log20log20
  • 39. 39 45.0 50.0 55.0 60.0 65.0 70.0 75.0 80.0 85.0 90.0 100 1000 50 fs 100 fs 200 fs 400 fs 800 fs Fullscale Analog Input (sinewave) 84dB 78dB AIN = 200 MHz Each line shows constant RMS clock jitter in femtoseconds (fs) 72dB 66dB 60dB 300 MHz 400 MHz 500 MHz SNR of ADC @ 200 MHz AIN varies with clock jitter SignaltoNoiseRatio(SNR)indB ADC Analog Input Sampling Clock SNR Digital Output As analog signal increases, clock jitter limits SNR         = jitter jit ft SNR π2 1 log20
  • 40. 40 Clocking AD9434 A/D Converter (12 Bits at 500MSPS)
  • 41. 41 Clocking AD9434 A/D Converter (12 Bits at 500MSPS)
  • 42. 42 Clocking AD9434 A/D Converter (12 Bits at 500MSPS)
  • 43. 2.43 Additive RMS Jitter of Logic Gates/Drivers FPGA (driver gates only) 33-50 ps** 74LS00 4.94 ps * 74HCT00 2.20 ps * 74ACT00 0.99 ps * MC100EL16 PECL 0.7 ps ** AD951x family 0.22 ps ** NBSG16, Reduced Swing ECL (0.4V) 0.2 ps ** ADCLK9xx, ECL Clock Driver Family <0.1 ps** * Calculated values based on degradation in ADC SNR ** Manufacturers' specification
  • 44. By Architecture & PerformanceNon-PLLPLLExtVCOPLLIntVCO Wideband RMS jitter ADCLK944 ADCLK905 ADCLK907 ADCLK925 ADCLK946 ADCLK948 ADCLK950 ADCLK954 ADCLK914 ADCLK846 ADCLK854 AD9512 AD9514 AD9515 AD9513 AD9508 AD9510 AD9511 AD9516-5 AD9520-5 AD9522-5 AD9516-0:4 AD9517-0:4 AD9518-0:4 AD9520-0:4 AD9522-0:4 AD9523 AD9524 AD9525 50 fs 150 fs100 fs 200 fs 250 fs 300 fs AdditiveJitter Absolute Jitter AD9523-1 6 8 10 12 6 6 8 10 12 12 8 14 14 12 12 10 5 5 6 124 9 3 3 2 2 2 1 1 8 Indicates # of outputs Front end loop of AD9523/4 Uses external Oscillator Absolute jitter includes oscillator performance and reference quality Additive jitter excludes oscillator performance and reference quality ADF4351 ADF4360 ADF4002, ADF4106 Stand-Alone PLL + Ext VCXO 1 ps
  • 45. 45 Voltage-controlled Oscillators Provide simplicity and versatility Simple RC-adjustable oscillators for undemanding applications Higher frequencies require specialized design
  • 46. 46 Voltage-controlled Oscillators ADF5508
  • 47. 3.47 LOOP FILTER VCXO System Clock Distribution Examples ADC FIFO 122.88 MHz 122.88 MHz LVPECL CMOS DELAY = 4.3ns HIGH SPEED MEASUREMENT SUBSYSTEM REFCLK 491.52 MHz LVPECL 30.72 MHz DAC DACFPGA LVDS CMOS CMOS QUADRATURE TRANSMIT SOURCE 61.44 MHz 61.44 MHz PHASE = 90° DELAY = 10ns 122.88 MHz LVPECL 491.52 MHz CLEAN_REFCLK 30.72 MHz CALIBRATION 15.36 MHz Clock ICs simplify board design by integrating phase control, delay adjust, frequency dividers, and logic translation PHASE = 0° TOYOCOM 491.52 MHz AD9513/AD9514/AD9515 easy to design in. Require only a +3.3V supply. All functionality selected by tying input pins to VS, GND, VREF, or NC
  • 48. 48 AD9516 Family 1.5 -3.0 GHz, 8/5-Channel Clock Distribution ICs Clock Outputs 1.2 GHz LVPECL 800 MHz LVDS 250 MHz CMOS PLL Core 250 MHz REFIN 1.6 GHz PLL Jitter Clean-up Programmable Dividers Any integer 1 to 32 Phase offset control Each divider independent Programmable Delay Adjust Fullscale from 1ns to 10ns 32 delay steps 64-LFCSP typically replaces Five(5) discrete ICs AD9510 Shown Below, Broadband RMS Jitter <1ps
  • 49. 3.49 AD9512 1.2GHz Clock Distribution IC Delay 1-10ns 1:5 Fanout Buffer Divide by 1-32 LVDS OR CMOS LVDS OR CMOS 225 fs rms 225 fs rms 350 fs rms 1-3 ps rms A rms jitter added to signal at A 225 fs rms Divide by 1-32 Divide by 1-32 Divide by 1-32 Divide by 1-32 LVPECL Buffer LVPECL Buffer LVPECL Buffer TOTAL JITTER = J1 2 + J2 2 + J3 2 +...+JN 2
  • 50. 50 ADI’s Complete Clock Portfolio Digital and All-Digital PLLs  Used for frequency multiplication/translation  Redundant Clocking and Holdover Synthesizers  Used for clock generation Clock Distribution  Used for sending the identical clock to multiple chips  Also used for logic level translation (i.e., LVPECL to LVDS)  May include frequency dividers (/2, /4, etc.)  May include skew adjustment Voltage-controlled oscillators
  • 51. 51 What we covered As system complexity and performance demands increase, frequency synthesis devices have had to keep pace with greater performance and versatility Design and application of phase-locked loops (PLLs) Design and application of direct digital synthesis (DDS) Software tools greatly simplify design and set-up of complex frequency synthesis devices Clocks for data converters need to have low jitter to keep distortion at a minimum Specialized clock generation and distribution allows precise frequency tuning and phase control
  • 52. Visit the DDS, PLL and CLK simulators in the demonstration room ADIsimCLK, ADIsimPLL and ADIsimDDS can quickly configure the complex registers and settings on frequency synthesis devices to provide optimum performance Image of demo/board 52 VERSION 3.5
  • 53. Design Conference Schedule 53 Advanced Techniques of Higher Performance Signal Processing Industry Reference Designs & Systems Applications 8:00 – 9:00 Registration 9:00-10:15 System Partitioning & Design Signal Chain Designer: A new way to design online High Speed Data Connectivity: More than Hardware Process Control System 10:15-10:45 Break and Exhibit 10:45-12:00 Data Conversion: Hard Problems Made Easy Amplify, Level Shift & Drive Precision Systems Rapid Prototyping with Xilinx Solutions Instrumentation: Liquid & Gas Sensing 12:00-1:30 Lunch and Exhibit 1:30-2:45 Frequency Synthesis and Clock Generation for High-Speed Systems Sensors for Low level Signal Acquisition Modeling with MATLAB® and Simulink® Instrumentation: Test & Measurement Methods and Solutions 2:45-3:15 Break and Exhibit 3:15-4:30 High Speed & RF Design Considerations Data & Power Isolation Integrated Software Defined Radio Motor Control 4:30-5:00 Exhibit and iPad drawing

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