Technical analysis of my favourite music videos. Tool : Stinkfist Slipknot : Wait and Bleed Tool : Ænema
Tool : Stinkfist <ul><li>This video is one of my  all-time favourites..  For the reason that is  alike a horror movie in w...
Strobe Lighting <ul><li>The use of blue strobes within this video exaggerate the all ready prominent blue grading gives th...
Link with lyrics <ul><li>The entire song is about how humans these days are over stimulated, to the extreme. As the charac...
Shaky and rough.. Wait And Bleed <ul><li>Through the whole video, Wait  and Bleed, every shot has an  element of roughness...
Image <ul><li>The main thing to note with the majority of Slipknots music videos is how they make sure that all 9 band mem...
Fun little touches.. <ul><li>The attention to detail within this video is pretty cool and really gives the audience the fe...
Tool : Ænema   <ul><li>This video (yes, its Tool again) is my favourite in the sense of how it inspires me to emulate the ...
Ripples.. <ul><li>Throughout the entire video  there are what seem to be  reflections off of water upon  the walls, it is ...
Stop-motion water! <ul><li>The use of water within a stop-motion  animation is not a common sight, as it makes  the entire...
Learn to swim..!
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Technical analysis of my favourite music videos

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Technical analysis of my favourite music videos

  1. 1. Technical analysis of my favourite music videos. Tool : Stinkfist Slipknot : Wait and Bleed Tool : Ænema
  2. 2. Tool : Stinkfist <ul><li>This video is one of my all-time favourites.. For the reason that is alike a horror movie in which the scary/make-you-jump bit never comes (the reason I don’t like horror !).. </li></ul><ul><li>As with all Tool videos there is all ways a stop-motion-animation element (the nail coming out of the poor guy’s stomach). It is more subtle in Stinkfist, but still there enough for the video to appear as “artsy-fartsy” as possible, as Tool’s thing is the focus of the music not the bands image. This goes against many typical conventions of music video’s in general as the band aren't featured, no instruments and no product placement what-so-ever ! </li></ul>
  3. 3. Strobe Lighting <ul><li>The use of blue strobes within this video exaggerate the all ready prominent blue grading gives the entire first two thirds an awesome cold feel. Strobing lights are used to great effect within a lot of horror movies, as to give all the camera movement and actual action a jumpy/frenetic feel, as the eye only catches every other second of footage. </li></ul><ul><li>Lighting is key within any sort of filming, non more so within a music video. Here they have used to hard lights in conjunction to produce to definite shadows which form the one. Hard lighting is almost all ways used in horror movies as it exaggerates features to make actors/monsters look more sinister. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Link with lyrics <ul><li>The entire song is about how humans these days are over stimulated, to the extreme. As the characters shave off the layer of a sandy blue dust. Which was probably achieved by covering the actors in liquid latex, then glue, then coloured sand. This “second skin” can then be ripped off in what looks like to be a VERRY painful process. </li></ul><ul><li>Another link to the lyrics would have to be the use of the “steam-punk” looking breathing apparatus. Making the substance supposedly exiting the mask some sort of drug, of which the characters are addicted too, like heroine where the first “hit” is the best and all the rest are dull in comparison. Not that Tool are promoting drug use or anything! </li></ul>
  5. 5. Shaky and rough.. Wait And Bleed <ul><li>Through the whole video, Wait and Bleed, every shot has an element of roughness. This is not surprising for a Slipknot video as they are no well known for their subtlety, more for their in-your-face aggressiveness (not quite counting their new album, but I’m not here to talk about that..). </li></ul><ul><li>The entire footage has a dirty brown grading upon it, which further enhances the alternative Metal look. The use of skulls and the stereotypical horror “crawling severed hand” also denote the genre as you wouldn’t see such disturbing images within a pop video. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Image <ul><li>The main thing to note with the majority of Slipknots music videos is how they make sure that all 9 band members are shown at least once. (8 now, R.I.P. Paul Grey.) This is one of their first videos and, of course shows all their original masks in jumpy stop-motion animation where they are revolting against their maker.. This is important due to Slipknots image consisting of the band members focusing on the music and tending to prefer being out of the public spot-light. This ceased to happen when the band broke up for a while and each perused their own stuff. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Fun little touches.. <ul><li>The attention to detail within this video is pretty cool and really gives the audience the feel of the atmosphere. And as you would expect, the image of body parts floating in un-mentionable fluids is not one for the feint hearted. Thus giving the video with not a lot of relevance to the actual song some character, even if it is just background stuff. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Tool : Ænema <ul><li>This video (yes, its Tool again) is my favourite in the sense of how it inspires me to emulate the same and do some stop-motion animation of my own. </li></ul><ul><li>In this screen-shot you can clearly see a figure walking up to a blank, presumably grey wall. Yet, everything within shot has a blue colour laid overtop with use of grades and tints. I like how the shot can be so simple, yet raise more questions that it answers. In this case; “who is this figure ?”, “where is he ?” etc etc.. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Ripples.. <ul><li>Throughout the entire video there are what seem to be reflections off of water upon the walls, it is the case even when there is no actual water in shot. </li></ul><ul><li>The production of rippling light in such a stop-motion animation full video was probably the most challenging of the production elements in the making. As, they were made shining feint light through loads of tiny lenses and making them spin at the same time as the rest of the animation. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Stop-motion water! <ul><li>The use of water within a stop-motion animation is not a common sight, as it makes the entire process take all that much more longer, seeing as you need to wait for the water to be completely still before taking the next picture. And at 25 frames per second, you can see how this sort of animation is tedious in the first place! </li></ul><ul><li>The water also has a strong connection with the lyrics, as it is chanted that we need to “learn to swim” as if there is a great flood on its way that will destroy civilisation as we know it. This is what Andrew Goodwin says, “there should be a relationship between the lyrics and the action.” </li></ul>
  11. 11. Learn to swim..!
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