Maintaining a Strong Project Vision,
Incorporating Feedback
“The critical job for the project manager is to focus on the
process enough for it to succeed, but not so much that the
su...
Why is it so hard (for mobile)?
• The goals and context are unique.
• The team is unique (and probably from several
depart...
Jasper Johns, Target, 1974
Borrowed from Jason Yip,
jchyip.blogspot.com
Finite: driven by a desire for closure/persistent.
Articulate: Ability to describe the “why” – in person.
Tolerant of conf...
Techniques for Managing Project Conflicts
Collaborate
Avoid
Compromise
AccommodateCompete
Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Ins...
Stakeholder
behavior:
…avoids
…compromises
…accommodates
…competes
…collaborates
Seriousness of conflict…
Inconsequential ...
“We can accommodate
that change, but we’ll
need to simplify the
scope to do so…”
“I really need it by
Friday. What can I d...
Project Scenario 1:
Your museum has a chief creative director who oversees all
aspects of print, digital, and environmenta...
Project Scenario 2:
You are showing the museum director a new app. “It’s great,”
she says. “But I’d like you to add a new ...
Project Scenario 3:
You are introducing a new contextual awareness feature that will
tell the visitor what’s nearby. Educa...
REQUIREMENTS
DOCUMENTATION
RFP
Sample use case scenario
Miriam is a guard stationed in the Art of the Pacific galleries. She
has an iPad and uses the app...
Sam is a 36 year-old museum member. As he pulls into the
parking garage, he receives an alert welcoming him to LACMA
and r...
Samples Requirements Document
Functional specifications:
1. Visitors with the app installed on their phone can receive an
...
Requirements Documentation
• Consider an “open spec” – one that doesn’t specify HOW the requirements
are to be met. Descri...
QA AND BUG TRACKING
Anatomy of a Bad Bug
What’s wrong with email?
Good luck with your own mobile projects
and happy project-managing!
Questions? aheibel@lacma.org or Twitter @aheibel
Project Management for Mobile/#MWeb2014/Aheibel
Project Management for Mobile/#MWeb2014/Aheibel
Project Management for Mobile/#MWeb2014/Aheibel
Project Management for Mobile/#MWeb2014/Aheibel
Project Management for Mobile/#MWeb2014/Aheibel
Project Management for Mobile/#MWeb2014/Aheibel
Project Management for Mobile/#MWeb2014/Aheibel
Project Management for Mobile/#MWeb2014/Aheibel
Project Management for Mobile/#MWeb2014/Aheibel
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Project Management for Mobile/#MWeb2014/Aheibel

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Slides for @aheibel portion of the Project Management for Mobile workshop at Museums and the Web 2014. I have done my best to attribute material sourced from the web and elsewhere. If you are aware of an attribution I have overlooked, please bring it to my attention.

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  • Your job as a project manager is to PAINT THE TARGET. Make sure everyone involved can see it as clearly as you can. Then KEEP them pointing at it.
  • Another way to look at this: as project manager, you help describe a target that makes a new and unfamiliar reality more tangible and achievable. “You want to create an environment that values closeness to the target, NOT how high up the arrow is.” Jason Yip, http://jchyip.blogspot.com/2011/10/if-result-is-better-than-target-then.html
  • Avoid: “That’s a possibility. Let me give it some thought and let’s return to it later.” or “I hear you, I really do.”Accommodate: “I see you have your own way of approaching this. Let’s do it your way.”Compromise: “Okay, I can move up the completion date, but I’ll need more resources/a simplified scope of work to do that.”Compete: “I know you feel strongly about that idea. But we can’t accommodate that change at this point. We need to stick to our current path.”Collaborate: “I like your idea. How can we make that work with some of the ideas we heard earlier that are part of this project?”
  • A good project manager can deploy all of the five conflict resolution strategies, choosing the right one for the situation. Collaboration requires the greatest degree of personal skills, as it requires both assertiveness AND cooperation in equal measure. But it also requires the greatest TIME and EFFORT. So you want to collaborate judiciously.
  • Be specific and practical.
  • Start with use case scenarios – museum people tend to be good at articulating these kinds of stories.
  • Extrapolate your functional requirements from your use case scenarios, as here.
  • Then go to mockups – drawings that illustrate the functionality derived from your use case scenarios.
  • All software projects have bugs. Bugs are not “somoene’s fault.”
  • Do not involve people with a phobia of bugs in debugging your app.
  • Know in advance which team members are prone to blame, fear, and inattention to detail and exclude them from bug tracking.
  • The person you want involved in bug reporting is someone with a scientific mindset.
  • A good bug ticket has these qualities.
  • What’s wrong with this bug?
  • What works about this bug ticket?
  • Don’t. Ever. Do. This.
  • Project Management for Mobile/#MWeb2014/Aheibel

    1. 1. Maintaining a Strong Project Vision, Incorporating Feedback
    2. 2. “The critical job for the project manager is to focus on the process enough for it to succeed, but not so much that the substantive goals of the project are neglected.” – Stephen Toney
    3. 3. Why is it so hard (for mobile)? • The goals and context are unique. • The team is unique (and probably from several departments). • The process is unique, the technology being new. “You may not know you are failing until it is too late.” Stephen Toney, http://www.systemsplanning.com/mnc2.asp
    4. 4. Jasper Johns, Target, 1974
    5. 5. Borrowed from Jason Yip, jchyip.blogspot.com
    6. 6. Finite: driven by a desire for closure/persistent. Articulate: Ability to describe the “why” – in person. Tolerant of conflict: willing to not be liked all the time. Assertive: able to stand up for what you need w. respect. Project Manager Personality Traits Insightful: a keen sense of individual stakeholder motivations. Congruent: agreement between stated and unstated motivations. Intuitive: possessing an innate sense of what must happen next.
    7. 7. Techniques for Managing Project Conflicts Collaborate Avoid Compromise AccommodateCompete Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument Palo Alto, CA:
    8. 8. Stakeholder behavior: …avoids …compromises …accommodates …competes …collaborates Seriousness of conflict… Inconsequential Inconvenient Threatens budget/schedule collaborate/ avoid avoid/ accommodate accommodate accommodate accommodate compete/collaborate accommodate compete/ collaborate compromise/ collaborate collaboratecollaborate accommodate compete/ compromise Compromise/acc ommodate compromise/acco mmodate
    9. 9. “We can accommodate that change, but we’ll need to simplify the scope to do so…” “I really need it by Friday. What can I do to clear some space for you so that can happen?” “We want to plant something small and water it, rather than plant something large and prune it.” (-Loic) Refrains of the Effective Project Manager “THANK YOU for… Your contribution means…” Congratulations!
    10. 10. Project Scenario 1: Your museum has a chief creative director who oversees all aspects of print, digital, and environmental design. His team is providing graphic interface design for your mobile project. They come to you with a Photoshop document showing exactly what the app should look like and do. What is wrong with this scenario and how can you avoid or resolve it?
    11. 11. Project Scenario 2: You are showing the museum director a new app. “It’s great,” she says. “But I’d like you to add a new section showing all the works of art on an interactive timeline so users can get a sense of art history.” What is wrong with this scenario and how can you address it? What would you say?
    12. 12. Project Scenario 3: You are introducing a new contextual awareness feature that will tell the visitor what’s nearby. Education staff are providing content. The app permits a 160 character “alert” and a 250 word main message with one image or video per message. The content you receive is 3 levels looooong and each layer includes multiple images and suggestions for video or audio. How would you handle this?
    13. 13. REQUIREMENTS DOCUMENTATION
    14. 14. RFP
    15. 15. Sample use case scenario Miriam is a guard stationed in the Art of the Pacific galleries. She has an iPad and uses the app to answer visitor questions. A visitor approaches and asks her where the Matisse works are. Miriam searches “Matisse”. And brings up a list of objects. The visitor points out a few that are particularly interesting. Miriam opens the full record and finds out the location of those objects in the galleries.
    16. 16. Sam is a 36 year-old museum member. As he pulls into the parking garage, he receives an alert welcoming him to LACMA and reminding him to launch the app. He launches the app and as he exits the garage, he receives an alert letting him know that there is a special tour with winetasting starting in 20 minutes. He indicates that he plans to join the event and shares the event to the social media channel of his choice to let his friends know what he’s doing. Sample Use Case Scenario
    17. 17. Samples Requirements Document Functional specifications: 1. Visitors with the app installed on their phone can receive an alert on their homescreen when they arrive on campus welcoming them, reminding them to launch the app. 2. At key locations around campus, the user of the app can receive short alerts letting them know what is nearby. These alerts may stay on screen for a short period of time (if they are location-specific) or remain on screen throughout their visit (if they are not location-specific). 3. The user can select an alert and be taken to extended content about an artwork, architectural highlight, event, or special offer.
    18. 18. Requirements Documentation • Consider an “open spec” – one that doesn’t specify HOW the requirements are to be met. Describe each feature at the level of interaction design and use cases – what each feature is and what the user experience should be. • Be very specific and plain-spoken. Avoid saying “it”. Keep value-laden and mission-driven language out of it. • Include expectations about longevity and maintenance. • Include front-end AND back-end expectations – ie, don’t just say what content you want to include; also specify your needs for managing that content. • Map requirements to objectives so that if something has to be cut you can be clear about what is being lost.
    19. 19. QA AND BUG TRACKING
    20. 20. Anatomy of a Bad Bug
    21. 21. What’s wrong with email?
    22. 22. Good luck with your own mobile projects and happy project-managing! Questions? aheibel@lacma.org or Twitter @aheibel

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