HxD 2012: Communities of Care: Social Media in Healthcare

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  • People: Patient, family members, primary care physician, specialist, pharmacist, nutritionist, chiropractor State of health: Healthy, symptoms, Not yet diagnosed, recently diagnosed, chronic Influencers: Emotional state, financial state, level of emotional Support, level of knowledge, access to technology, laws, level of insurance Interactions: Decision support, online visits, communications, conversations Organizations: Hospitals, pharmacies, employers, government, communities, Non-Profit orgs Objects: Medications, procedures, claims
  • People: Patient, family members, primary care physician, specialist, pharmacist, nutritionist, chiropractor State of health: Healthy, symptoms, Not yet diagnosed, recently diagnosed, chronic Influencers: Emotional state, financial state, level of emotional Support, level of knowledge, access to technology, laws, level of insurance Interactions: Decision support, online visits, communications, conversations Organizations: Hospitals, pharmacies, employers, government, communities, Non-Profit orgs Objects: Medications, procedures, claims
  • People: Patient, family members, primary care physician, specialist, pharmacist, nutritionist, chiropractor State of health: Healthy, symptoms, Not yet diagnosed, recently diagnosed, chronic Influencers: Emotional state, financial state, level of emotional Support, level of knowledge, access to technology, laws, level of insurance Interactions: Decision support, online visits, communications, conversations Organizations: Hospitals, pharmacies, employers, government, communities, Non-Profit orgs Objects: Medications, procedures, claims
  • Social media platforms can turn 10- or 20-minute doctor’s visits into an ongoing dialogue Knowledge from patient-peers thru social media *can* mean more helpful talks w/ dr; dr. p.o.v. helpful for patients to read.
  • Social media platforms can turn 10- or 20-minute doctor’s visits into an ongoing dialogue Knowledge from patient-peers thru social media *can* mean more helpful talks w/ dr; dr. p.o.v. helpful for patients to read.
  • Community: Online and Local Live Connectors Organizational (The System): Digital access to caregivers, health coordinators, health coaches, nutritionists, nurses Interpersonal: Support tools for family and friends, weaving them into the experience, interventions Individual : Goal setting and tracking (where they are – SMS, iPhone, etc), personalized program and messaging, health games , health journals, HRAs, PHRs, messages to myself.
  • HxD 2012: Communities of Care: Social Media in Healthcare

    1. 1. Communities of Care:Social Media in HealthcareAmy CuevaMad*Pow@amycueva y
    2. 2. Introductions,Agenda & Why I<3 Healthcare XD
    3. 3. Regina Holliday@ReginaHolliday | http://reginaholliday.blogspot.com
    4. 4. The HealthcareTh H l hLandscape
    5. 5. Healthcare Landscape pPeopleOrganizationsState of healthInfluencersInteractionsObjects j
    6. 6. A healthy caretaker
    7. 7. One managing a chronic condition
    8. 8. Social M di inS i l Media iHealthcare
    9. 9. This presentation• Social media defined• How it could help• The current landscape: examples• Ideas and opportunities• Risks, considerations & barriers• Success and failure• What have you seen?• What do you hope to see?
    10. 10. Please?• I know some stuff. I bet you all know more.• Make a comment or ask a question question.
    11. 11. Social media…• is content created by people (UGC)• is based on user participation• includes social networks• is an umbrella term…• integrates technology & social interaction g gy• are tools for sharing and discussing information among human beings
    12. 12. Under the common definition• Wikis: Wikipedia• Blogs/Podcasts SME with comments Blogs/Podcasts: SME,• Microblogs: Status updates, replies/comments• Forums: Niche, patientslikeme• Social networks: Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter• Social sharing: YouTube, Flickr
    13. 13. Under an extended definition• Text: email, SMS or MMS, instant messenger, instant chat secure message box chat,• Voice: phone, voicemail, tele-conferencing skype, online audio recording li di di• Video & Hybrid: video, webinar, video- conferencing/chat (online appointments)
    14. 14. Communication access points• Phone: Traditional, mobile, skype• Mobile/handheld: Multiple platforms• Computer: Personal or Dr. Office• Kiosk: Hospital or Dr. Office• Print: Fax, snail mail.• In person: Humans With or without tech• Vi sponsors: I Via Insurance, hospitals, providers, h it l id government, corps, orgs
    15. 15. Communication characteristics• Live or asynchronous• 1 to 1 or 1 to many• Inbound or outbound• Proactive or reactive• Required or desired q• Channel switching/coordination
    16. 16. Why social media for healthcare?• Doctors are outnumbered: There are many more patients than doctors.• Frequency & access: How often do you have access to a doctor vs. access to a computer, vs computer phone or mobile device?• Th information is out there: I our minds, in The i f ti i t th In i d i websites and DBs. Tech and SM frees the info, makes it searchable/shareable. k h bl / h bl• We have the tools: Healthcare is behind.
    17. 17. Why social media for healthcare?• People care: They are motivated, there is a strong sense of community, karma, give and take.• It is already happening: The Pew Internet and American Life Project Survey says 61% of Americans go online for health information information, with a majority turning to user-generated content. content
    18. 18. How it could help• Informed, prepared, and empowered patients• Convenient access points, higher engagement points• Emotional support• More persuasive, social proof
    19. 19. How it could help• Timely, robust, and different information availability and sharing, CDL, EMR, EHR, PHR y g, , , ,• That one detail• C ll b ti and coordinated care Collaboration d di t d• Ongoing and more frequent interactions• Interventions, outreach• Drug adherence biometric feedback adherence,
    20. 20. Ideas &IdOpportunities
    21. 21. Relationships, Frequency, and Access Track Organizations Reflect Become aware Encourage Care Team Achieve Celebrate Intervene Community Reach out Share Friends & Family Visit Inform Communicate Self Coordinate Escalate Obtain data
    22. 22. PHR & Social MediaPHR data feeds profileProfile bP fil becomes matching system t hi tRich profile attracts relevant people, objects, p p p , j ,interactionsSocial media enables interactionsData makes interactions more meaningfulInteractions produce data
    23. 23. Connecting Self • Wii Fit • PHRs, HRAs • Health Tracking Tools: iPhone Apps, SMS Trackers, health journals • patientslikeme: profile, tracking • S SugarStats: T ki St t Tracking
    24. 24. Promoting Positive Reflection • Baseline data is being gathered and the people are helping each other. y • Can the system: • Help the user to notice and track the positive • Reinforce the positive in order to promote repetition • Provide guidance, include support team and introduce professionals at certain points • Track behaviors through and integrate with native communication channels: email, text messages, instant messages twitter facebook messages, twitter,
    25. 25. Journaling • Take pictures of your food – nutrition and portion size analyzed for feedback • Take pictures of your walk – it get’s reflected back to you • Personalized outreach messages messages, communication plan to yourself
    26. 26. Patient Collaboration • Ning: Anyone can create a community on any topic, photo & video sharing, forum, blog, profile • Google Health Groups: Anyone, any topic, forums • RevolutionHealth: Forums, rate doctors • patientslikeme: Forum, profile, blog, status update, comment • SugarStats: Forums • Daily Strength: Forums, information, trackers • Twitter: Text, email, online
    27. 27. Enabling & Informing Patient/Doctor Interactions • PHRs, EMRs, EHRs • American Well: Immediate connection online or phone • RelayHealth: Web Visit (Form), Secure Messages • h ll h lth E il IM and Video hellohealth: Email, IM, d Vid Chat • patientslikeme: Forum - some caregivers participate i i i • Healthcare Magic: Instant Chat, Request Phone Call • AthenaHealth: Automated and live communication • Twitter: Text, email, online
    28. 28. Enabling & Informing Patient/Doctor Interactions • Dr. and patients can log in to review lab results and xrays, via screenshare or live appointment • Log in to take a pre-visit questionnaire, fill out forms, and create questions for your doctor • View doctor’s notes from visit, (OpenNotes) and follow up care plan, track against it g • Dr. access to your health journal • Ongoing dialogue with Dr: check in to review progress leave notes system progress, notes, can escalate, interventions • Connect with Dr. online via email, instant chat SMS online visit chat, SMS,
    29. 29. Care Team Collaboration
    30. 30. Influence of the System • How can the system do work for the user and for the doctor, bubbling up the most important information? Hi there there. • Can the dialogue the system has with you improve the quality of interaction you experience with your doctor? Can it become a healthcare interaction unto itself? • Can the system match people with similar traits, match people with specialists? p p p • Can the system assist with forms? The patient could fill out forms ahead of time, so they don’t have to do it in the waiting room. Their g answers can yield recommended questions, next steps, tests, etc.
    31. 31. Bringing it Together • There is information in many places, and holistic health portals with caregiver communication integration are starting to happen. • Take a mashup, portal or Blackboard approach: The patient’s entry point to all of their health care providers, personal supporters, communities, and health information w/ integrated digital communication and support tools. • Who will do this? Each doctor could have their own virtual office, health insurance companies, or PHR providers could push forward.
    32. 32. Designing Social Experiences:The content is theconversation.
    33. 33. Socio Cybernetic Model for Conversation
    34. 34. Social Media Design BasicsYou can’t design the conversationBut the interface can mediate, guide, inform theconversationThe interface can encourage or discouragecertain types of behavior - through identity,reputation systems, game mechanics...
    35. 35. Why Community?Start with the high-level strategic goals and objectives forthe site – then answer: why community? answerWhat kinds of engagement do you want to encourage onyour site?What is the desired outcome?There is no end-state!This will help map out your strategic direction.
    36. 36. Participation VisionRather than pursue Social Media strategies basedon fashion, as designers we need to think about fashion e abo thow we want the site to engage with people — whowant to engage with each otherand create architectures, features, and architectures featuresfunctionalities that creates a path for participationAsk: where is the community going to go?
    37. 37. Social Experience Design Considerations• Create articulated contexts• Design for identity• Interests, Passions, Goals• Presence• Groups, Tribes, Cohorts• Trust
    38. 38. Social Experience Design Considerations• Reputation• Conversation• Spheres of Intimacy• Privacy• Governance• Serendipity
    39. 39. In the end: community members will own it• Once designed, communities of care are not in the hands of those that funded, designed, built it - it must be g handed over to patients and the community - letting go is the hardest thing• Shift thinking from “What it does” to “What people are doing and saying”• Create a system so that it can become what it will mean to each person, and as a result, service the community“The street finds it’s own uses for things”
    40. 40. Risks & Considerations• Get me one of those!: Select channels and solutions based upon relevancy and appropriateness as opposed to popularity• Bli d deployment: E Blind d l t Ensure user involvement in th i l t i the design process and a solid strategy• Bad information: How will quality of information be measured, ensured, sustained, moderated, handled?
    41. 41. Risks & Considerations• Crisis mgmt: Set expectations, know when to react, react and react appropriately• Legal action: Anticipate problems, understand audience expectations, explore potential uses and di t ti l t ti l d misuses, design for them• Stagnation: Plan to support and measure ongoing participation, contribution, and nurturing/guardianship
    42. 42. Potential Barriers• HIPAA• Legal• Probability of positive and clearly quantifiable results lt• Time and investment required• Lack of understanding or fear• Governance & operational support
    43. 43. Creating a social media strategy• What is our objective?• How will we measure success?• Who will be interacting? What will they want and expect? d t?• What channels/media/technologies will best support the interaction?• Will this design work?• How much will this cost? How will it be supported?• What is our implementation and evolution plan?
    44. 44. What have you seen?• What has worked well?• Wh t hasn’t? What h ’t?
    45. 45. What do you hope to see?• What will we see next year, or in 5 years?• Wh t h inspired you? What has i i d ?
    46. 46. Questions?
    47. 47. Design Challenge

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