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HxD 2012: Communities of Care: Social Media in Healthcare
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HxD 2012: Communities of Care: Social Media in Healthcare

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  • People: Patient, family members, primary care physician, specialist, pharmacist, nutritionist, chiropractor State of health: Healthy, symptoms, Not yet diagnosed, recently diagnosed, chronic Influencers: Emotional state, financial state, level of emotional Support, level of knowledge, access to technology, laws, level of insurance Interactions: Decision support, online visits, communications, conversations Organizations: Hospitals, pharmacies, employers, government, communities, Non-Profit orgs Objects: Medications, procedures, claims
  • People: Patient, family members, primary care physician, specialist, pharmacist, nutritionist, chiropractor State of health: Healthy, symptoms, Not yet diagnosed, recently diagnosed, chronic Influencers: Emotional state, financial state, level of emotional Support, level of knowledge, access to technology, laws, level of insurance Interactions: Decision support, online visits, communications, conversations Organizations: Hospitals, pharmacies, employers, government, communities, Non-Profit orgs Objects: Medications, procedures, claims
  • People: Patient, family members, primary care physician, specialist, pharmacist, nutritionist, chiropractor State of health: Healthy, symptoms, Not yet diagnosed, recently diagnosed, chronic Influencers: Emotional state, financial state, level of emotional Support, level of knowledge, access to technology, laws, level of insurance Interactions: Decision support, online visits, communications, conversations Organizations: Hospitals, pharmacies, employers, government, communities, Non-Profit orgs Objects: Medications, procedures, claims
  • Social media platforms can turn 10- or 20-minute doctor’s visits into an ongoing dialogue Knowledge from patient-peers thru social media *can* mean more helpful talks w/ dr; dr. p.o.v. helpful for patients to read.
  • Social media platforms can turn 10- or 20-minute doctor’s visits into an ongoing dialogue Knowledge from patient-peers thru social media *can* mean more helpful talks w/ dr; dr. p.o.v. helpful for patients to read.
  • Community: Online and Local Live Connectors Organizational (The System): Digital access to caregivers, health coordinators, health coaches, nutritionists, nurses Interpersonal: Support tools for family and friends, weaving them into the experience, interventions Individual : Goal setting and tracking (where they are – SMS, iPhone, etc), personalized program and messaging, health games , health journals, HRAs, PHRs, messages to myself.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Communities of Care:Social Media in HealthcareAmy CuevaMad*Pow@amycueva y
    • 2. Introductions,Agenda & Why I<3 Healthcare XD
    • 3. Regina Holliday@ReginaHolliday | http://reginaholliday.blogspot.com
    • 4. The HealthcareTh H l hLandscape
    • 5. Healthcare Landscape pPeopleOrganizationsState of healthInfluencersInteractionsObjects j
    • 6. A healthy caretaker
    • 7. One managing a chronic condition
    • 8. Social M di inS i l Media iHealthcare
    • 9. This presentation• Social media defined• How it could help• The current landscape: examples• Ideas and opportunities• Risks, considerations & barriers• Success and failure• What have you seen?• What do you hope to see?
    • 10. Please?• I know some stuff. I bet you all know more.• Make a comment or ask a question question.
    • 11. Social media…• is content created by people (UGC)• is based on user participation• includes social networks• is an umbrella term…• integrates technology & social interaction g gy• are tools for sharing and discussing information among human beings
    • 12. Under the common definition• Wikis: Wikipedia• Blogs/Podcasts SME with comments Blogs/Podcasts: SME,• Microblogs: Status updates, replies/comments• Forums: Niche, patientslikeme• Social networks: Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter• Social sharing: YouTube, Flickr
    • 13. Under an extended definition• Text: email, SMS or MMS, instant messenger, instant chat secure message box chat,• Voice: phone, voicemail, tele-conferencing skype, online audio recording li di di• Video & Hybrid: video, webinar, video- conferencing/chat (online appointments)
    • 14. Communication access points• Phone: Traditional, mobile, skype• Mobile/handheld: Multiple platforms• Computer: Personal or Dr. Office• Kiosk: Hospital or Dr. Office• Print: Fax, snail mail.• In person: Humans With or without tech• Vi sponsors: I Via Insurance, hospitals, providers, h it l id government, corps, orgs
    • 15. Communication characteristics• Live or asynchronous• 1 to 1 or 1 to many• Inbound or outbound• Proactive or reactive• Required or desired q• Channel switching/coordination
    • 16. Why social media for healthcare?• Doctors are outnumbered: There are many more patients than doctors.• Frequency & access: How often do you have access to a doctor vs. access to a computer, vs computer phone or mobile device?• Th information is out there: I our minds, in The i f ti i t th In i d i websites and DBs. Tech and SM frees the info, makes it searchable/shareable. k h bl / h bl• We have the tools: Healthcare is behind.
    • 17. Why social media for healthcare?• People care: They are motivated, there is a strong sense of community, karma, give and take.• It is already happening: The Pew Internet and American Life Project Survey says 61% of Americans go online for health information information, with a majority turning to user-generated content. content
    • 18. How it could help• Informed, prepared, and empowered patients• Convenient access points, higher engagement points• Emotional support• More persuasive, social proof
    • 19. How it could help• Timely, robust, and different information availability and sharing, CDL, EMR, EHR, PHR y g, , , ,• That one detail• C ll b ti and coordinated care Collaboration d di t d• Ongoing and more frequent interactions• Interventions, outreach• Drug adherence biometric feedback adherence,
    • 20. Ideas &IdOpportunities
    • 21. Relationships, Frequency, and Access Track Organizations Reflect Become aware Encourage Care Team Achieve Celebrate Intervene Community Reach out Share Friends & Family Visit Inform Communicate Self Coordinate Escalate Obtain data
    • 22. PHR & Social MediaPHR data feeds profileProfile bP fil becomes matching system t hi tRich profile attracts relevant people, objects, p p p , j ,interactionsSocial media enables interactionsData makes interactions more meaningfulInteractions produce data
    • 23. Connecting Self • Wii Fit • PHRs, HRAs • Health Tracking Tools: iPhone Apps, SMS Trackers, health journals • patientslikeme: profile, tracking • S SugarStats: T ki St t Tracking
    • 24. Promoting Positive Reflection • Baseline data is being gathered and the people are helping each other. y • Can the system: • Help the user to notice and track the positive • Reinforce the positive in order to promote repetition • Provide guidance, include support team and introduce professionals at certain points • Track behaviors through and integrate with native communication channels: email, text messages, instant messages twitter facebook messages, twitter,
    • 25. Journaling • Take pictures of your food – nutrition and portion size analyzed for feedback • Take pictures of your walk – it get’s reflected back to you • Personalized outreach messages messages, communication plan to yourself
    • 26. Patient Collaboration • Ning: Anyone can create a community on any topic, photo & video sharing, forum, blog, profile • Google Health Groups: Anyone, any topic, forums • RevolutionHealth: Forums, rate doctors • patientslikeme: Forum, profile, blog, status update, comment • SugarStats: Forums • Daily Strength: Forums, information, trackers • Twitter: Text, email, online
    • 27. Enabling & Informing Patient/Doctor Interactions • PHRs, EMRs, EHRs • American Well: Immediate connection online or phone • RelayHealth: Web Visit (Form), Secure Messages • h ll h lth E il IM and Video hellohealth: Email, IM, d Vid Chat • patientslikeme: Forum - some caregivers participate i i i • Healthcare Magic: Instant Chat, Request Phone Call • AthenaHealth: Automated and live communication • Twitter: Text, email, online
    • 28. Enabling & Informing Patient/Doctor Interactions • Dr. and patients can log in to review lab results and xrays, via screenshare or live appointment • Log in to take a pre-visit questionnaire, fill out forms, and create questions for your doctor • View doctor’s notes from visit, (OpenNotes) and follow up care plan, track against it g • Dr. access to your health journal • Ongoing dialogue with Dr: check in to review progress leave notes system progress, notes, can escalate, interventions • Connect with Dr. online via email, instant chat SMS online visit chat, SMS,
    • 29. Care Team Collaboration
    • 30. Influence of the System • How can the system do work for the user and for the doctor, bubbling up the most important information? Hi there there. • Can the dialogue the system has with you improve the quality of interaction you experience with your doctor? Can it become a healthcare interaction unto itself? • Can the system match people with similar traits, match people with specialists? p p p • Can the system assist with forms? The patient could fill out forms ahead of time, so they don’t have to do it in the waiting room. Their g answers can yield recommended questions, next steps, tests, etc.
    • 31. Bringing it Together • There is information in many places, and holistic health portals with caregiver communication integration are starting to happen. • Take a mashup, portal or Blackboard approach: The patient’s entry point to all of their health care providers, personal supporters, communities, and health information w/ integrated digital communication and support tools. • Who will do this? Each doctor could have their own virtual office, health insurance companies, or PHR providers could push forward.
    • 32. Designing Social Experiences:The content is theconversation.
    • 33. Socio Cybernetic Model for Conversation
    • 34. Social Media Design BasicsYou can’t design the conversationBut the interface can mediate, guide, inform theconversationThe interface can encourage or discouragecertain types of behavior - through identity,reputation systems, game mechanics...
    • 35. Why Community?Start with the high-level strategic goals and objectives forthe site – then answer: why community? answerWhat kinds of engagement do you want to encourage onyour site?What is the desired outcome?There is no end-state!This will help map out your strategic direction.
    • 36. Participation VisionRather than pursue Social Media strategies basedon fashion, as designers we need to think about fashion e abo thow we want the site to engage with people — whowant to engage with each otherand create architectures, features, and architectures featuresfunctionalities that creates a path for participationAsk: where is the community going to go?
    • 37. Social Experience Design Considerations• Create articulated contexts• Design for identity• Interests, Passions, Goals• Presence• Groups, Tribes, Cohorts• Trust
    • 38. Social Experience Design Considerations• Reputation• Conversation• Spheres of Intimacy• Privacy• Governance• Serendipity
    • 39. In the end: community members will own it• Once designed, communities of care are not in the hands of those that funded, designed, built it - it must be g handed over to patients and the community - letting go is the hardest thing• Shift thinking from “What it does” to “What people are doing and saying”• Create a system so that it can become what it will mean to each person, and as a result, service the community“The street finds it’s own uses for things”
    • 40. Risks & Considerations• Get me one of those!: Select channels and solutions based upon relevancy and appropriateness as opposed to popularity• Bli d deployment: E Blind d l t Ensure user involvement in th i l t i the design process and a solid strategy• Bad information: How will quality of information be measured, ensured, sustained, moderated, handled?
    • 41. Risks & Considerations• Crisis mgmt: Set expectations, know when to react, react and react appropriately• Legal action: Anticipate problems, understand audience expectations, explore potential uses and di t ti l t ti l d misuses, design for them• Stagnation: Plan to support and measure ongoing participation, contribution, and nurturing/guardianship
    • 42. Potential Barriers• HIPAA• Legal• Probability of positive and clearly quantifiable results lt• Time and investment required• Lack of understanding or fear• Governance & operational support
    • 43. Creating a social media strategy• What is our objective?• How will we measure success?• Who will be interacting? What will they want and expect? d t?• What channels/media/technologies will best support the interaction?• Will this design work?• How much will this cost? How will it be supported?• What is our implementation and evolution plan?
    • 44. What have you seen?• What has worked well?• Wh t hasn’t? What h ’t?
    • 45. What do you hope to see?• What will we see next year, or in 5 years?• Wh t h inspired you? What has i i d ?
    • 46. Questions?
    • 47. Design Challenge

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