Native Americans (2)

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Native Americans (2)

  1. 1. From “Noble Savage” to “Vanishing Indian”: Euro-American Perceptions of Native Americans English 441 Dr. Roggenkamp Edited by Mrs. Burk
  2. 2. Native-American Literature is a Post-Colonial Literature <ul><li>Literature by a COLONIZING culture (e.g. people of European descent) usually distorts the experience and realities of the colonized people—creates a picture of innate inferiority in terms of the colonized people </li></ul><ul><li>Literature by the COLONIZED culture (e.g. Native Americans) attempts to regain the power to speak for themselves, rather than be spoken ABOUT by the colonizers </li></ul>
  3. 3. Your Turn <ul><li>What is the difference between a colonized culture and a colonizing culture? </li></ul>
  4. 4. Native-American Literature Characteristics <ul><li>This literature articulates group identity, reclaims the past, writes their version of history—but also recognizes the influence of the colonizer </li></ul><ul><li>Colonizing countries often appropriate the languages, images, scenes, traditions, etc. of the colonized land—and vice versa </li></ul>
  5. 5. Your Turn <ul><li>What are the four characteristics of Native American literature? </li></ul><ul><li>How does the colonizing culture change the literature of the colonized culture? </li></ul>
  6. 6. Colonial New England conceptions Native Americans <ul><li>View 1: Native Americans lost tribes of Israel, waiting for conversion </li></ul><ul><li>View 2: Native Americans as children of Satan – descendents of fallen angels </li></ul><ul><li>Either way, justification to eradicate people and culture </li></ul><ul><li>Image: The Death of Jane McCrea , John Vanderlyn, 1804 </li></ul>
  7. 7. Your Turn <ul><li>What was the colonist’s view of Native Americans? </li></ul>
  8. 8. Southern colonial conceptions of indigenous peoples <ul><li>“ Noble Savage” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Savage” meaning “uncivilized” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Noble” meaning innocent, pure, wise, childlike, connected to nature, spiritual—but uncultured </li></ul><ul><li>Merely inferior rather than the intrinsically evil </li></ul><ul><li>Open to European guidance and deliverance </li></ul><ul><li>Totally romanticized view </li></ul><ul><li>Image: Baptism of Pocahontas , John G. Chapman, Capitol Rotunda, Washington D.C. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Your Turn <ul><li>What is the meaning of </li></ul><ul><li>“ Noble Savage”? </li></ul>
  10. 10. “ Noble Savage”
  11. 11. “ The Vanishing Indian” <ul><li>Pre-contact indigenous population of North America: est. 10-15 million (about 2 million today) </li></ul><ul><li>Disease and warfare </li></ul><ul><li>From 1840s : Native Americans are “vanishing race” </li></ul><ul><li>Vanishing in face of “superior” Euro-American advance </li></ul><ul><li>Justifies advance of non-Native population and eradication of Native American cultures </li></ul><ul><li>Image: Last of Their Race , John Mix Stanley, 1857 </li></ul>
  12. 12. Indian Removal Act of 1830 <ul><li>President Andrew Jackson </li></ul><ul><li>Force Native American removal from East </li></ul><ul><li>Guise of protecting and preserving Indian cultures </li></ul><ul><li>Move west or give up all tribal rights </li></ul><ul><li>Removal as only way to “civilize” the “vanishing Indian” </li></ul>
  13. 13. Your Turn <ul><li>Why did President Andrew Jackson remove the Native Americans from the East? </li></ul><ul><li>If the Native Americans did not move West, what would they have to do? </li></ul>
  14. 14. The “Trail of Tears”
  15. 15. Your Turn <ul><li>What was the </li></ul><ul><li>“ Trail of Tears”? </li></ul><ul><li>Explain how you would feel if you were a Native American then and now. </li></ul>

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