Chapter 18              Virtual Circuit                Switching:                Frame Relay                   and        ...
18.1 Virtual Circuit Switching          Global Addressing          Virtual Circuit Identifier          Three Phases       ...
Figure 18.1 Virtual circuit wide area networkMcGraw-Hill                                                   ©The McGraw-Hil...
Figure 18.2 VCIMcGraw-Hill                     ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
Figure 18.3 VCI phasesMcGraw-Hill                            ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
Figure 18.4   Switch and tableMcGraw-Hill                                    ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
Figure 18.5   Source-to-destination data transferMcGraw-Hill                                                   ©The McGraw...
Figure 18.6   SVC setup requestMcGraw-Hill                                     ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
Figure 18.7   SVC setup acknowledgmentMcGraw-Hill                                            ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, I...
Frame Relay(FR)      Frame relay is a virtual circuit wide-area-network that was designed in response to      demands for ...
McGraw-Hill   ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
Figure 18.8   Frame Relay networkMcGraw-Hill                                       ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
Note:            VCIs in Frame Relay are called          DLCIs.(data link connection identifier)McGraw-Hill               ...
Figure 18.9   Frame Relay layersMcGraw-Hill                                      ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
Note:              Frame Relay operates only at the               physical and data link layers.McGraw-Hill               ...
Figure 18.10   Frame Relay frameMcGraw-Hill                                      ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
Frame Relay frameMcGraw-Hill                       ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
Frame Relay frameMcGraw-Hill                       ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
Note:          Frame Relay does not provide flow or         error control; they must be provided by                the upp...
Figure 18.12   FRADMcGraw-Hill                         ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
18.3 ATM(Asynchronous Transfer Mode)          Design Goals          Problems          Architecture          Switching     ...
Design GoalsMcGraw-Hill                  ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
ProblemsMcGraw-Hill              ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
Problems contd..McGraw-Hill                      ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
Note:               A cell network uses the cell as the              basic unit of data exchange. A cell is               ...
ATM multiplexingMcGraw-Hill                      ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
Figure 18.16 Architecture of an ATM networkMcGraw-Hill                                                 ©The McGraw-Hill Co...
Figure 18.17 TP, VPs, and VCsMcGraw-Hill                                   ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
Figure 18.18   Example of VPs and VCsMcGraw-Hill                                           ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc...
Note:              Note that a virtual connection is               defined by a pair of numbers:                   the VPI...
Figure 18.19   Connection identifiersMcGraw-Hill                                           ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc...
Figure 18.20 Virtual connection identifiers in UNIs and NNIsMcGraw-Hill                                                 ©T...
Figure 18.21 An ATM cellMcGraw-Hill                              ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
Figure 18.22   Routing with a switchMcGraw-Hill                                          ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.,...
Figure 18.23 ATM layersMcGraw-Hill                             ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
Figure 18.24 ATM layers in endpoint devices and switchesMcGraw-Hill                                                ©The Mc...
Figure 18.25 ATM layerMcGraw-Hill                            ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
Figure 18.26 ATM headersMcGraw-Hill                              ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
Figure 18.27 AAL1McGraw-Hill                       ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
Figure 18.28 AAL2McGraw-Hill                       ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
Figure 18.29 AAL3/4McGraw-Hill                         ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
Figure 18.30 AAL5McGraw-Hill                       ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
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Computer Networks

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Computer Networks

  1. 1. Chapter 18 Virtual Circuit Switching: Frame Relay and ATMMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  2. 2. 18.1 Virtual Circuit Switching Global Addressing Virtual Circuit Identifier Three Phases Data Transfer Phase Setup Phase Teardown PhaseMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  3. 3. Figure 18.1 Virtual circuit wide area networkMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  4. 4. Figure 18.2 VCIMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  5. 5. Figure 18.3 VCI phasesMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  6. 6. Figure 18.4 Switch and tableMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  7. 7. Figure 18.5 Source-to-destination data transferMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  8. 8. Figure 18.6 SVC setup requestMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  9. 9. Figure 18.7 SVC setup acknowledgmentMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  10. 10. Frame Relay(FR) Frame relay is a virtual circuit wide-area-network that was designed in response to demands for a new type of WAN. • Prior to FR, X.25 was being used. But it is being replaced by other WANs. • X.25 has several drawbacks: •It has a low 64-kbps data rate. •X.25 has extensive flow and error control at both data link and network layer. Flow and error control at both layers create a large overhead and slow down transmission. •Originally X.25 was designed for private use, not for the Internet. •Disappointed with X.25, some organization started their own private WAN by leasing T-1 0r T-3 lines from public service providers. This approach has also some limitations: •If an organization has n branches spread over an area, it needs n(n-1)/2 lines. •This type of service is not suitable for bursty data. Because T-1 or T-3 provides fixed data rate and bursty data require bandwidth-on-demand.McGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  11. 11. McGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  12. 12. Figure 18.8 Frame Relay networkMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  13. 13. Note: VCIs in Frame Relay are called DLCIs.(data link connection identifier)McGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  14. 14. Figure 18.9 Frame Relay layersMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  15. 15. Note: Frame Relay operates only at the physical and data link layers.McGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  16. 16. Figure 18.10 Frame Relay frameMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  17. 17. Frame Relay frameMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  18. 18. Frame Relay frameMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  19. 19. Note: Frame Relay does not provide flow or error control; they must be provided by the upper-layer protocols.McGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  20. 20. Figure 18.12 FRADMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  21. 21. 18.3 ATM(Asynchronous Transfer Mode) Design Goals Problems Architecture Switching LayersMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  22. 22. Design GoalsMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  23. 23. ProblemsMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  24. 24. Problems contd..McGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  25. 25. Note: A cell network uses the cell as the basic unit of data exchange. A cell is defined as a small, fixed-sized block of information.McGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  26. 26. ATM multiplexingMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  27. 27. Figure 18.16 Architecture of an ATM networkMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  28. 28. Figure 18.17 TP, VPs, and VCsMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  29. 29. Figure 18.18 Example of VPs and VCsMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  30. 30. Note: Note that a virtual connection is defined by a pair of numbers: the VPI and the VCI.McGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  31. 31. Figure 18.19 Connection identifiersMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  32. 32. Figure 18.20 Virtual connection identifiers in UNIs and NNIsMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  33. 33. Figure 18.21 An ATM cellMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  34. 34. Figure 18.22 Routing with a switchMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  35. 35. Figure 18.23 ATM layersMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  36. 36. Figure 18.24 ATM layers in endpoint devices and switchesMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  37. 37. Figure 18.25 ATM layerMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  38. 38. Figure 18.26 ATM headersMcGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  39. 39. Figure 18.27 AAL1McGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  40. 40. Figure 18.28 AAL2McGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  41. 41. Figure 18.29 AAL3/4McGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004
  42. 42. Figure 18.30 AAL5McGraw-Hill ©The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004

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