Solar System
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Solar System

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  • TEACHER’S NOTES Luminous – candle, sun, torch Non-luminous – Earth, apple, rabbit
  • TEACHER’S NOTES Postcard 1 – Jupiter Postcard 2 – Mercury Postcard 3 - Pluto
  • TEACHER’S NOTES Answers: 1c) 2b)
  • TEACHER’S NOTES Answers: 3c) 4c)
  • TEACHER’S NOTES Answers: 5c) 6c)
  • TEACHER’S NOTES Answers: 7b) 8a)
  • TEACHER’S NOTES Answers: 9b) 10c)

Solar System Solar System Presentation Transcript

  • 7L The Solar System and beyond Time on Earth Views from the Earth Beyond the Earth 7L The Solar System and beyond
  • 7L The Solar System and beyond Time on Earth
  • What do you know about the temperature and number of daylight hours in each season? Why do we have different seasons? 7L Time on Earth – Four seasons Which season is shown in each picture?
  • 7L Time on Earth – Days, years and seasons
  • 5. There is more daylight in our summer because at this time of year the northern hemisphere is positioned away from the Sun.   7L Time on Earth – True or false True or False? Click on the box to start the quiz 7. When it is winter in Australia, the northern hemisphere is positioned towards the Sun.   3 . The Sun appears to move across the sky each day because the Earth is orbited by the Sun. 4. As the rotating Earth moves around the Sun, the angle of the Earth’s axis changes. 5. There is more daylight in our summer because at this time of year the northern hemisphere is positioned away from the Sun.   FALSE! During our summer the northern hemisphere is positioned towards the Sun. 6. In winter the highest position of the Sun in the sky is lower than in summer.   TRUE! 6. In winter the highest position of the Sun in the sky is lower than in summer.   8. During summer at the South Pole there is daylight for 24 hours. At the same time the North Pole has daylight for 24 hours.   FALSE! When the South Pole has daylight for 24 hours, the North Pole has night-time for 24 hours. 8. During summer at the South Pole there is daylight for 24 hours. At the same time the North Pole has daylight for 24 hours.   9. If the Earth rotated faster about its axis, our days would be longer.   FALSE! Days on Earth would be shorter if our planet rotated faster about its axis. 7. When it is winter in Australia, the northern hemisphere is positioned towards the Sun.   TRUE! 9. If the Earth rotated faster about its axis, our days would be longer. 10. If the Earth was not tilted at an axis there would be no seasons. TRUE! 1. The time for the Earth to rotate once about its axis is called a year. 10. If the Earth was not tilted at an axis there would be no seasons.   2. During one complete orbit of the Sun, the Earth rotates about its axis 365 times. 4. As the rotating Earth moves around the Sun, the angle of the Earth’s axis changes. FALSE! The Earth’s axis is always tilted at the same angle (23.5  ). 2. During one complete orbit of the Sun, the Earth rotates about its axis 365 times. TRUE! 3 . The Sun appears to move across the sky each day because the Earth is orbited by the Sun. FALSE! It’s the Earth that orbits the Sun and that’s why the Sun appears to move across the sky. FALSE! The Earth rotates about its axis once every 24 hours, which is one day . 1. The time for the Earth to rotate once about its axis is called a year.
  • 7L The Solar System and beyond Views from the Earth
  • How are we able to see objects in space? Stars, like our Sun, are sources of light. We see them because they give out their own light. The Moon is not a source of light. We only see the Moon because it reflects the Sun’s light. A source of light, like a star, is called a luminous object . The Moon is an example of a non-luminous object . 7L Views from Earth – Seeing objects in space
  • 7L Views from Earth – Seeing objects in space Decide which of these objects are luminous and non-luminous.
  • 7L Views from Earth – The Moon We only ever see one side of the Moon, but does the Moon always look the same from Earth? Why do we see the same pattern each month? The Moon is called a “natural satellite” because it is not man-made and moves around the Earth. Our view of the Moon changes in a regular pattern as it moves around the Earth. This pattern is called the phases the Moon .
  • 7L Views from Earth – Phases of the Moon
  • 7L Views from Earth - Shadows and eclipses What will happen when the torch is switched on? Can you name two types of eclipses viewed from Earth? Eclipses are caused by shadows. Light travels in straight lines.
  • 7L Views from Earth – Lunar and solar eclipse A lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon moves into the Earth’s shadow. Eclipses depend on the different positions of the Sun, the Earth and the Moon. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon’s shadow moves across part of the Earth. How is daylight affected during a total solar eclipse?
  • 7L Views from Earth – Lunar eclipse Where must the Moon be for a lunar eclipse to take place? During a lunar eclipse the Earth blocks the Sun’s light from reaching the Moon. During a lunar eclipse the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth to the Sun.
  • 7L Views from Earth – Solar eclipse During a solar eclipse the Moon blocks the Sun’s rays from reaching part of the Earth. Where must the Moon be for a solar eclipse to take place? During a solar eclipse the Moon moves directly between the Sun and the Earth.
  • 7L The Solar System and beyond Beyond the Earth
  • 7L Beyond the Earth – The Solar System The Solar System is the collection of planets, moons and all the other objects that move around the Sun.
  • 7L Beyond the Earth – The Solar System What is the difference between how can we see planets and how can we see stars? Ancient astronomers observed the movements of the planets and thought they were wandering stars. We now know that the planets are not stars. In ancient Greece these heavenly objects were called “ planētes ” meaning “wanderers”.
  • 7L Beyond the Earth – Order of the planets You need to know the order of the planets in the Solar System. One way to remember is to think of a mouse and his nine pizzas! M ercury V enus E arth M ars J upiter S aturn U ranus N eptune P luto M y V ery E xcited M ouse J ust S queaked U nder N ine P izzas
  • 7L Beyond the Earth – Planetary distances Draw a scale diagram showing the relative distances of the planet from the Sun. Use the distances in astronomical units with a scale of 1 centimetre = 1 AU.
  • 7L Beyond the Earth – Name that planet
  • 1. A lunar eclipse can also be called an eclipse of the … a) the Sun. b) the Earth. c) the Moon. 2. A solar eclipse happens when the Moon moves… a) into the Earth’s shadow. b) between the Earth and the Sun. c) between Mars and the Sun. 7L Beyond the Earth – Universe challenge
  • 3. The Solar System started out as a big ball of dust. When did the Solar System begin to form? a) 8,000 years ago. b) 2.3 million years ago. c) 4.5 billion years ago . 7L Beyond the Earth – Universe challenge 4. The asteroid belt is found between the orbits of which two planets? a) Jupiter and Saturn. b) Earth and Mars. c) Mars and Jupiter.
  • 6 . What is the heaviest object in the Solar System? a) The Earth. b) Jupiter. c) The Sun. 5. The closer a planet is to the Sun… a) the more moons it has. b) the longer its year. c) the shorter its year. 7L Beyond the Earth – Universe challenge
  • 7 . Scientists who study the Solar System and the Universe are called… a) astrologers. b) astronomers. c) Australians. 8. A galaxy is made of millions of stars. Our Solar System is part of a galaxy called… a) the Milky Way. b) the Cheesy Way. c) Andromeda. 7L Beyond the Earth – Universe challenge
  • 10. The millions of galaxies and the space between them form… a) a very big bar of chocolate. b) the asteroid belt. c) the Universe. 7L Beyond the Earth – Universe challenge 9. How wide is our galaxy? a) 900, 000 centimetres. b) 900, 000 light years. c) 900, 000 inches.