Manga Art

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Small documentation on Japanese Manga Art. …

Small documentation on Japanese Manga Art.
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  • 1. JAPANESE MANGA ART Manga is the Japanese term for comics. The term manga means "random The word Manga can also be translated as, “humorous pictures.” used in 1798 to describe the picture book showed up again in 1814 as the title of Aikawa Minwa's Manga, books that contained drawings by the artist Hokusai. PRONUNCIATION: (Maw – Nnnnn – Gah) In Japanese, it is is spoken very quickly. MODERN MANGA: Modern manga developed an explosion of artistic creativity during the U.S. occupation of Japan, from 1945–1952. During the occupation, U.S. troops introduced American comics and cartoons, such as inspiring Japanese artists to develop their own style of comics. Japanese cartoonist, Osamu Tezuka, known as the God of Manga and Godfather of Anime, invented the distinctive large eyes prominent in both manga and anime. His manga series, Boy, went on to become the first Japa that became known worldwide as anime. The series was first broadcast in Japan in 1963. ‘Shiji no yukikai’ of ‘Kyoden Santo [1] JAPANESE MANGA ART Manga is the Japanese term for comics. The term manga means "random The word Manga can also be translated as, “humorous pictures.” The word was first used in 1798 to describe the picture book Shiji no yukikai of Kyoden Santo again in 1814 as the title of Aikawa Minwa's Manga Hyakujo and , books that contained drawings by the artist Hokusai. Gah) In Japanese, it is actually three syllables, although the middle "N" developed an explosion of artistic creativity during the U.S. occupation 1952. During the occupation, U.S. troops introduced American comics and cartoons, such as Mickey Mouse, Betty Boop, and Bambi to Japan to develop their own style of comics. Japanese cartoonist, , known as the God of Manga and Godfather of Anime, invented the distinctive large eyes prominent in both manga and anime. His manga series, , went on to become the first Japanese television series to embody the aesthetic that became known worldwide as anime. The series was first broadcast in Japan in Hokusai's Famous FacesKyoden Santo’ Manga is the Japanese term for comics. The term manga means "random pictures". The word was first of Kyoden Santo. The term and Hokusai actually three syllables, although the middle "N" developed an explosion of artistic creativity during the U.S. occupation 1952. During the occupation, U.S. troops introduced American Mickey Mouse, Betty Boop, and Bambi to Japan, to develop their own style of comics. Japanese cartoonist, , known as the God of Manga and Godfather of Anime, invented the distinctive large eyes prominent in both manga and anime. His manga series, Astro nese television series to embody the aesthetic that became known worldwide as anime. The series was first broadcast in Japan in Hokusai's Famous Faces
  • 2. [2] THE FORMAT OF MANGA COMICS: Manga usually follows the traditional style as found in Japan. Japanese Manga is to be read from the right side to the left, opposite of traditional American books. Not only we have to read the pages from right to left, but we also read the panels and text from right to left. There have been attempts to make Manga published in America to look and read like traditional American books, but many artists have opposed this. The fans of Manga have also been a part of making sure that many Manga produced in America today is in the traditional Japanese style. Manga is usually much smaller and collected in small volumes. They appear like small books, closer in appearance to the Archie Digests. In Japan, Manga is first published in Manga magazines that collect different stories. If certain ones get really popular, then the stories are collected and published in a new volume. Many times, the Manga has a large amount of work already published, as in the case of the popular Naruto, which has just begun to make a splash here in America. The image below shows how we should read Manga. Following the numbers for the panels and the text boxes to get the flow of reading Manga. At first it can be confusing, but, it will come easier over time and practice. 1. Start in the Upper-Right Corner of the Upper-Right panel. Read the panel from right to left. 2. Repeat the process in the panel to the immediate left. 3. After the final panel on the left, move down the page & repeat starting with the first Right panel. 4. Drawings are typically done in pen and ink, with an emphasis on clean lines. Manga is influenced by Japanese calligraphy and painting, where a round ink brush is used to produce thick strokes.
  • 3. [3]
  • 4. [4] CHARECTERISTICS & STYLES OF MANGA ART: The predominant manga “style” maintains both conventionality and iconicity.  The Iconicity makes it accessible and easily decodable to individuals across the globe.  Conventionality reflects that its patterns are shared by many “visual speakers.” There are many characteristics that make Manga very distinctive. The largest thing that Manga art is known for is its characters. Manga characters almost always have,  Very large, almond-shaped eyes.  Small mouths.  Out-of-proportion body parts (Sometimes)  Abnormal hair color. These things give their characters a very unique look to them.
  • 5. [5] TYPES OF MANGA: Since Manga is so widely popular in Japan, different kinds of Manga have become known. Each has its own title and when getting into Manga, it can help to know what is what. Below is a list of the different kinds of Manga. 1. Shônen – Boy’s Manga – (Pronounced Show-Nen) 2. Shôjo – Girl’s Manga – (Pronounced Show-Joe) 3. Seinen – Men’s Manga – (Pronounced Say-Nen) 4. Josei (or redikomi) – Women’s Manga – (Pronounced Joe-Say) 5. Kodomo – Children’s Manga – (Pronounced Kow-Dow-Mow)  Shônen Manga is usually action packed and humorous.  Shôjo Manga is often more light-hearted and involves romance.  Seinen Manga will often have more adult themes, with some containing graphic violence and sexually explicit material.  Hentai, which is erotic Manga. This kind of Manga is considered pornographic by most people.
  • 6. [6] GRAPHIC ELEMENTS: Many graphic elements used in manga extend beyond iconic representations like those used for people, which are used to represent invisible qualities such as emotions or motion. These can come in two forms:  Non conventional visual symbols or metaphors.  Conventional graphic emblems, like sweeping lines to show motion and bubbles encapsulating text to show speech. Non-conventional visual symbols and metaphors take many forms. Shojo manga Often make emotional use of non-narrative signs in the backgrounds of their panels.  Using Pastiches of flowers or sparkling lights to set a mood or hint at underlying symbolic Meaning.  Sex especially is often depicted through metaphoric crashing surf or Blossoming flowers. In most cases, symbols like these heighten the emotional impact of the representations, or creatively adapt them to better suit the graphic form.
  • 7. Conventional graphic emblems in manga vary in their transparency of meaning. For Eg.  In conventional depictions of rage or anger, characters grow sharp fangs and pointy claws while fire erupts behind them. An angry character will have rosy cheeks and steam rolling from around their body.  A vein popping out of a character's forehead to show stress.  Sweat drops to signify worry.  Characters have "X" eyes to show they've been knocked out or have fallen ill.  When a character cries, it usually pours out in buckets.  When they laugh, their face seems engulfed by the size of their mouths and their eyes become slits.  Gigantic sweat drops conveying embarrassment or nervousness.  Bloody noses depicting lust.  Lengthening of the area between the nose and lips to indicate sexual thoughts.  Even more unusual, some characters will suddenly become “super taking on a hyper cartoony or “deformed” style lack of seriousness. [7] graphic emblems in manga vary in their transparency of meaning. For Eg. depictions of rage or anger, characters grow sharp fangs and pointy claws while fire erupts behind them. An angry character will have rosy cheeks and steam rolling from around their body. A vein popping out of a character's forehead to show stress. rops to signify worry. Characters have "X" eyes to show they've been knocked out or have fallen ill. When a character cries, it usually pours out in buckets. When they laugh, their face seems engulfed by the size of their mouths and their Gigantic sweat drops conveying embarrassment or nervousness. Bloody noses depicting lust. Lengthening of the area between the nose and lips to indicate sexual thoughts. Even more unusual, some characters will suddenly become “super a hyper cartoony or “deformed” style — to show a spontaneous general graphic emblems in manga vary in their transparency of meaning. For Eg. depictions of rage or anger, characters grow sharp fangs and pointy claws while fire erupts behind them. An angry character will have rosy Characters have "X" eyes to show they've been knocked out or have fallen ill. When they laugh, their face seems engulfed by the size of their mouths and their Lengthening of the area between the nose and lips to indicate sexual thoughts. Even more unusual, some characters will suddenly become “super-deformed” — to show a spontaneous general
  • 8. [8] Kinetic lines that show motion are another graphic emblem that has a great influence on Japanese Visual Languages. Often in action sequences, the background will possess an overlay of neatly ruled lines to portray direction of movements. Kinetic lines can also be applied to characters as a way to emphasise the motion of their bodies (limbs in particular). This style, especially background blurs, extends into most action based anime as well. Rather than showing lines trailing the moving object, manga often show the moving object statically with lines streaming behind it. The result makes the reader feel as though they are travelling at the same speed as the object, and is one of numerous techniques that McCloud claims manga use to render a more subjective viewpoint. Indeed, the use of motion lines as a whole appears different in the manga than in older American comics. Lines commonly substitute for the object itself to show a blurred motion, or surround an object in a flurry of notes. These distinctly different strategies for depicting motion were amongst the first characteristics appropriated by English- speaking comic authors as manga increased in readership in America throughout the 1980s and 90s (McCloud 1996).
  • 9. [9] GRAMMAR: Although individual images can convey a great deal of information, the real power of Language comes from its sequence — combining multiple units to create a cohesive meaning greater than the parts alone. Most readers should be aware that the pages in Japanese manga are read from right- to-left, the opposite of American comics. While this is an aspect of sequence, it plays a negligible role in the creation of meaning. The visual grammar is concerned with how meaning is conveyed to the reader in the content of sequential images, whether that sequence is organized right-to-left or the opposite. The first major approach to VL grammar was popularized by McCloud, who hypothesized that sequential meaning could be inferred from the linear relationships between panels, accomplished through various types of “panel transitions.” His types of Transitions included:  Moment-to-moment – show a short amount of time passing  Action-to-action – show a whole action occurring  Subject-to-subject – show a shift from character to character  Scene-to-scene – shift between two different environments  Aspect-to-aspect – step outside of time to show aspects of the environment  Non-sequitur – have no logical relationship between panels Moment-to-moment Action-to-action Subject-to-subject Scene-to-scene Aspect-to-aspect Non-sequitur
  • 10. [10] PANELS: In addition to forming parts of a sequence, panels can serve to “window the attention” of a reader onto different parts of a narrative representation. Panels allows us to control what the readers see and help emphasize moods. Panels can be categorized into varying types based on how much information they contain.  Polymorphic panels depict whole actions through the repetition of individual characters at various points in that event.  Macros are panels that show multiple characters or a whole scene,  Monos show only individual entities.  Micros contain less than a whole entity, such as in a close-up of a character where only part of the person is shown at a time. These types of panels can be organized from actions to scenes to individual characters to less than a character and are graphed in the Lexical Representational Matrix. EXPRESSIVE DIALOGUE BUBBLES: The borders of the speech/thought bubbles change in pattern/style to reflect the tone and mood of the dialogue. For example, an explosion-shaped bubble for an angry exclamation.
  • 11. [11] MMANGA INFLUENCE ON FASHION: Mikio Sakabe's Manga-Inspired Fashion Show: Japanese designer Mikio Sakabe staged a manga-inspired fashion show in Tokyo's Akihabara district, known for its electronic gadgets and techno geek culture. The show was a part of the Akihabara Entertainment Festival 2009, a nine-day event covering anime, manga and other modern Japanese entertainment forms. In a nod to the setting for the show, Sakabe showed maid-inspired looks as well as tulle skirts in candy colors paired with oversized T-shirts, and a tuxedo-inspired jacket and dress combo. Another quirky touch: some of the girls sported cat ears or tails and carried small Stuffed animals as they walked the stage.
  • 12. [12] Italian label Gucci has collaborated with Japanese Manga artist Hirohiko Araki for its 2013 windows: The brand's creative director, Frida Giannini, has teamed up with renowned Japanese Manga artist Hirohiko Araki to create a window installation inspired by the label's Cruise 2013 collection. Entitled "Jolyne, Fly High with Gucci," Araki's Manga tells the adventure of Jolyne Cujoh, a student who inherits a keepsake from her mother's Gucci collection. Propelled by the mystery behind her vintage treasure, Cujoh embarks on a journey that transcends time; the images echo the colour palette and aesthetic of Giannini's newest collection. Gucci illustration by Hirohiko Araki Looks from the Gucci Cruise 2013 collection which inspired Araki's Manga
  • 13. [13] Lana Del Rey stars in manga-inspired shoot for Numéro Tokyo by Mariano Vivanco: Songbird Lana – Appearing in an other fashion glossy, songstress Lana Del Rey poses in a manga inspired spread for the March issue of Numéro Tokyo. Photographed by Mariano Vivanco with styling by Miranda Almond, Lana stars in a colorful, fantastical back drop in standout spring look from Thea likes of Chanel, Valentino, Roberto Cavalli and Prada. Hair stylist Pamela Cochrane and makeup artist Anna Cofone create the brunette’s dreamy beauty looks.
  • 14. [14] MANGA ART & ELEMENT OF DESIGN: The aesthetics of Manga art are affected by various Elements of Design factors, like Lines, Rhythm, Color Scheme, emphasis etc. Manga characters are drawn in the same way most Japanese things are designed- simple, efficient, yet complex and well thought out at the same time. Unnecessary detail is left out, every line, color, highlight and shadow serve a purpose in emphasizing things about the character; personality, body- type, right down to their fitness, the softness of their skin.  EMPHASIS ON EYE: One of the first things people remember about Manga is the large, shiny, detailed eyes sported by Manga characters. Just as in real life, the eyes of a character in a Manga are used as a major tool to express what they are feeling, and who they are as a person.
  • 15. [15]  COLOUR SCHEME: Manga often uses colorful expressive backgrounds. It can be a little surprising to people not familiar with Manga when the background suddenly changes to pink with little bubbles all over it and the character is just standing there, but it is an excellent way to highlight emotion and drama. Also, most Manga series feature characters with brightly colored hair. This makes a character stand out much more, be more appealing and have a lot more personality if they've got some excitingly colored hair. For Eg. Red: Passion, joy, aggression, energy, love (basically strong emotions) Pink: Femininity, purity, childlike, love, kindness Orange: Energy, balance, enthusiasm, warmth, seeking attention Green: Fortune(good and bad), envy, harmony, life, vigor, tranquility Black: Power, evil, emptiness, sadness, mystery, sophistication, completeness, death White: Purity, simplicity, peace, humility, cold, heaven (can also mean death) Blue: Peace, calm, stability, dark blue means more responsible than light blue.
  • 16. [16]  LINES: In action sequences, the background will possess an overlay of neatly ruled lines to portray direction of movements. They can also be applied to characters as a way to emphasize the motion of their bodies (limbs in particular)  Parallel vertical lines with dark shading over the head or under the eye may represent mortification, fatigue, or horror.  Wavy lines represent disgust.  Thick black lines around the character may indicate trembling due to anger, shock or astonishment. This is usually accompanied by a rigid pose or super deformed styling.
  • 17. [17]  PERSPECTIVE: There is a proper use of perspective can be seen in most of the Manga comics. Specially in the works of Osamu Tezuka. These are represented with both one & multiple point perspective. Which added an extra depth to the story & makes the reader to involve more with it.  USE OF PROPORTION: Most of the manga artists maintain a good proportion of the other elements with the main character with respect to their positions. For example, they show the characters in front with more detail than the back. Because of this, the reader can predict the situation with a lot more involvement with it. The use of Perspective along with proportion gives an extra depth to the story.
  • 18. [18]  DOTS: Dots of different size & colours are used to represent invisible qualities & emotions. BIBLIOGRAPHY:  Web sites:  www.wikipedia.com  www.about.com  http://sumthinblue.com/  www.infoplease.com  http://fashion.telegraph.co.uk/  http://www.wwd.com  http://www.fashiongonerogue.com/  http://www.howtodrawmanga.com/  E-Books:  ‘Japanese Visual Language: The Structure of Manga’ by ‘Neil Cohn’  ‘Manga Tips for Beginners’ by ‘Joanna Zhou’  ‘Shojo Fashion: Manga Art School’ by ‘Irene Flores’