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Cubism
Cubism
Cubism
Cubism
Cubism
Cubism
Cubism
Cubism
Cubism
Cubism
Cubism
Cubism
Cubism
Cubism
Cubism
Cubism
Cubism
Cubism
Cubism
Cubism
Cubism
Cubism
Cubism
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Cubism
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Cubism
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Cubism

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It was the first abstract style of modern art. Developed by Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso in 1907 in Paris, France. …

It was the first abstract style of modern art. Developed by Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso in 1907 in Paris, France.

Cubism isn't just painting, it is also sculpting.

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  • 1. CUBISM (1906–1919)(1906–1919)
  • 2. Cubism… It was the first abstract style of modern art. Developed by Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso in 1907 in Paris, France.Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso in 1907 in Paris, France. Cubism isn't just painting, it is also sculpting.
  • 3. The artists of Cubism also known as "Cubists" challenged the perspective aspect of art with the intention of developing a new way of seeing. The artists of Cubism also known as "Cubists" challenged the perspective aspect of art with the intention of developing a new way of seeing.
  • 4. The main influences and spreaders of Cubism are, Georges Braque & Pablo Picasso 1881-19731882-1963
  • 5. Development of cubism: The works of Paul Cézanne inspired Picasso and Braque in the early 20th century. Particularly, they examined the fragmented space of Cézanne’s paintings, • the ambiguity of forms in space • the ambiguity of foreground/background - of whether an object is in from of or• the ambiguity of foreground/background - of whether an object is in from of or behind another object • objects that tended to dissolve, leading to abstraction • the simple forms of cubes, spheres, and cones. • African art was also influential. Picasso and Braque looked at the simple geometric forms and masks. From these various types and components of art, they developed the style that came to be known as Cubism.
  • 6. Mont sainte victoire-1897 (Paul Cézanne) Objects that tended to dissolve, leading to abstraction
  • 7. Still life-1879 (Paul Cézanne) The simple forms of spheres, and cones.
  • 8. Mountains in provence-l-estaque (Paul Cézanne) The ambiguity of foreground/background
  • 9. Still life pitcher & fruit-1894 (Paul Cézanne) The simple forms of cubes, spheres
  • 10. Still life with bottle & apple basket-1894 (Paul Cézanne) The simple forms of cubes, spheres
  • 11. Some important aspects of cubism include… • Facetted forms • Very limited palette • Multiple views of the subject • In some of Picasso’s portraits, you can see the frontal view and profile of the person.the person. • The cubist style emphasized the flat, two-dimensional surface of the picture plane, rejecting the traditional techniques of perspective. Foreshortening, modeling, and chiaroscuro (the arrangement of light and dark elements in a pictorial work of art) were included. • Cubist painters were not bound to copying form texture, color, and space. Instead, they presented a new reality in paintings that depicted radically fragmented objects, whose several sides were seen simultaneously.
  • 12. Two types of cubism, 1) Analytical Cubism (1908 to 1911)1) Analytical Cubism (1908 to 1911) 2) Synthetic Cubism (1912 to 1919)
  • 13. The first of two phases of Cubism was called “Analytic” because, ‘it analyzed the form of objects by shattering them into fragments spread out on the canvas.’ This creates the illusion of movement because we can see several angles of the same subject. kaleidoscope like effectThe artist achieves this kaleidoscope like effect by using lines to divide the artwork into geometric shapes. The colors in analytical cubism are usually neutral and muted. Changes in value, or shading, within the many angles help create interest and a sense of density. Subject matter is often ambiguous, or hard to determine.
  • 14. Pablo Picasso, Les Demoiselles d'Avignon, 1907, considered to be a major step towards the founding of the Analytical Cubism.
  • 15. Portrait of Ambrose Vollard, 1910 (Pablo Picasso) Portrait of Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler, 1910 (Pablo Picasso)
  • 16. La Guitare, 1909-10 (Georges Braque) Violin and Candlestick, 1910 (Georges Braque)
  • 17. Ma Jolie, 1911 (Pablo Picasso) Le Portugais (The Emigrant), 1911-12 (Georges Braque)
  • 18. Synthetic cubism Was developed 1912 Colour was re-introduced with two technical innovations called Papier Collé & Collage. – Papier collé involves sticking colored paper onto the canvas and was invented by Braque. – Collage was subsequently developed by Picasso and involved including all– Collage was subsequently developed by Picasso and involved including all kinds of material such as newspaper or fabric in the painting. Both techniques bridged the gap between art and life by sticking bits of the real world onto the canvas. They also drew attention to the fact that a painting it is a flat object and blurred the line between painting and sculpture.
  • 19. Picasso's first collage Still Life with Chair Caning was created in May of 1912 (Musée Picasso, Paris).
  • 20. Braque's first Papier Collé (pasted paper) Fruit Dish with Glass was created in September of 1912 (Boston Museum of Fine Arts).
  • 21. Guitar Newspaper Glass Bottle (Pablo Picasso) Three Musicians, 1921 (Pablo Picasso)
  • 22. Fruit dish ace clubs (Georges Braque) Bowl of Fruit (The Fruit Dish, 1912 (Pablo Picasso)
  • 23. Violin Melodie, 1914 (Georges Braque)
  • 24. SCULPTURES Cubist sculpture developed in parallel with Cubist painting, beginning in Paris around 1909 with its proto-Cubist phase, andpainting, beginning in Paris around 1909 with its proto-Cubist phase, and evolving through the early 1920s. Just as Cubist painting, Cubist sculpture essentially is the dynamic rendering of three-dimensional objects in the language of non-Euclidean geometry by shifting viewpoints of volume or mass in terms of spherical, flat and hyperbolic surfaces.
  • 25. Cubist Sculptures by ‘Jacques Lipchitz’ (1981-1973) Man with a MendolinePierrot with Clarinet Guitar Player in Chair
  • 26. End of Cubism… During 1913 and 1914, Cubism had a widespread influence all over Europe and even in New York, where small cubist exhibits were held. But all that came to an end when World War I erupted in Europe. Braque and several other artist were called to arms to defend their countries. Many art historians mark this event as the end of Cubism, but others believe that it extended into the 1920's by Picasso, who did not go to war. Even though the art movement had ended, some of its style carried on into differentEven though the art movement had ended, some of its style carried on into different aspects of modern art. Cubism gave the world a new view on realism with its distortion and overlapping. Cubism can be seen as the starting point for, or an essential element in, several other modern art movements, including Futurism (1909-14), Orphism (1910-13), Vorticism (1914-15), Constructivism, (c.1919-1932), & Purism (1920-25).
  • 27. “Cubism is like standing at a certain point on a mountain and looking around. If you go higher, things will look different; if you go lower, again they will look different. It is a point of view.”different. It is a point of view.” -Jacques Lipchitz (Cubist Sculpture)
  • 28. BIBLIOGRAPHY • http://www.cubistro.com/cubotimeline.htmlhttp://www.cubistro.com/cubotimeline.html • http://www.people.vcu.edu/~djbromle/modern04/elizabethc/index.htm • http://www.wikipaintings.org/de/paintings-by-style/synthetic-cubism#close
  • 29. Thank You !!

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