Farmland by the Numbers: 2007 National Resources Inventory
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Farmland by the Numbers: 2007 National Resources Inventory Document Transcript

  • 1. Farmland loss is an issue of national importance. The largest acreage loss was in Texas, which had a staggering 2.9 million, followed by Florida and California with both losing more than 1.5 million acres. Another 34 states lost more than 250,000 acres each.
  • 2. In the United States, we’ve been losing more than an acre of farmland per minute. States losing the largest proportion of their land were clustered in the Northeast, with New Jersey and Rhode Island each losing more than 20 percent.
  • 3. Even farming areas that were thought to be so big, so productive and so important as to be almost untouchable are in danger. Florida and California, two of the three states experiencing the largest acre losses of agricultural land, currently account for 47 percent of the nation’s vegetables and 71 percent of its fruit production based on market value.
  • 4. Despite pressures from growth, some states developed relatively less land and were able to protect more acreage of land than what was lost.
  • 5. www.farmland.org/nri