11	Corporate	Accountability	Report                            American	Electric	Power	20    9	                           T...
Audit Review of This Report                                                                                               ...
About	This	Report	                                                                Company Overview 2010                   ...
www.AEPsustainability.com                                                                       Index of Topics           ...
A Message from the Chairman & CEODear	Friends:                                                                            ...
www.AEPsustainability.comWe are in desperate need of a comprehensive federal energy policy thataddresses environmental con...
Our 2010 earnings of $ 3.03 per share on anongoing basis were at the upper end of our                                     ...
www.AEPsustainability.com                                                                        AEP Chairman & CEO Mike M...
Leadership, Management & StrategyAn Integrated, Stakeholder-Informed Strategy                                      trend t...
www.AEPsustainability.comThe	ancient	Greek	philosopher	Heraclitus	said,	“The only constant is change.”He could have been d...
other matters that could affect the company’s competitiveness or         the Kleen Energy Plant natural gas explosion in C...
www.AEPsustainability.comAEP	Board	of	DirectorsMichael G. Morris                           Ralph D. Crosby, Jr.           ...
The	Business	of	Sustainability		    A View from Two Members of AEP’s Board of Directors    A company’s governance and its ...
www.AEPsustainability.comLionel L. Nowell IIIAEP invests significant time and energy engaging with                  develo...
Earnings	Per	Share ( GAAP )                                              Total	Debt	/	Capitalization ( GAAP )	2008	       ...
www.AEPsustainability.com403                                                   Ongoing	Earnings	Per	Share	History         ...
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report

1,864 views
1,800 views

Published on

American Electric Power's plans and its environmental, social and financial performance. See more at AEPsustainability.com.

Published in: Investor Relations
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,864
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report

  1. 1. 11 Corporate Accountability Report American Electric Power 20 9 Transforming Our Business for Sustainable Growth $70 energy efficiency in 2010 invested in million
  2. 2. Audit Review of This Report AEP Audit Services performed a review of the in- formation included in this 2011 AEP Corporate Statement Accountability Report. Financial information was reconciled with AEP’s audited financial statements, if applicable, or to such other sources as deemedGRI hereby states that American Electrical Power has presented its report “2011 Corporate Account- appropriate. Processes used in accumulating the significant nonfinancial data were reviewed and the data were reconciled to the source(s). The appropriateness of the context in which data areG3 Guidelines. presented was also reviewed. Finally, the forward- looking information presented was verified as con- sistent with other public information disclosed by31 March 2011, Amsterdam AEP. Based upon our review, we believe the in- formation contained in the report is appropriately stated, and that the processes followed in accu- mulating both the financial and nonfinancial infor-Nelmara Arbex mation are reasonable. Contact Information For information about this report, the content ofDisclaimer: our website or AEP’s sustainability initiatives, or tolater changes to such material. provide feedback, please contact Sandy Nessing at smnessing@AEP.com or Jerra Thomas at jmthomas2@AEP.com.
  3. 3. About This Report Company Overview 2010 AEP Economic Impact 2010 Total System – Annual SO2 Emissions ( in thousand U.S. tons ) American Electric Power has been providing electric service for more Employees (year-end) 18,712This is AEP’s second integrated report combining the An- than 100 years and is one of the nation’s largest electric utilities, serving 2005 900 Wages $1.8 billionnual Report to Shareholders with the Corporate Sustainabil- 5.3 million customers in portions of 11 states. Construction Expenditures $ 2.3 billion 1 2006 853 ity Report. This is our fifth year of reporting our sustainability Revenues (in billions) $14.4 Local Taxes $ 489 million 2007 749 performance. This printed report is supported by a web- Net Income (in millions) $1,211 1site – www.AEPsustainability.com – that includes significant Earnings Per Share $ 2.53 1 State Taxes $ 361 million 2008 638 Federal Taxes $326 millionadditional data and information about AEP’s performance. Cash Dividends Per Share $1.71 Goods & Services (does not include fuel) $ 3.6 billion 2009 457This report is based largely on calendar year 2010 with ex- Service Territory 200,000 square miles Goods & Services from Diverse Suppliers $ 340 million 2010 416ceptions for early 2011 data as noted. For more information Transmission 39,000 miles Remaining Value of All Contracts $ 1.04 billion 2about AEP, visit www.AEP.com. Distribution 220,000 miles Coal Purchased (tons) 64.6 million Total System – Annual NOx Emissions ( in thousand U.S. tons ) Generating Capacity 39,000 MW 2 2005 275 Coal Average Purchase Price (per ton) $ 44.82Global Reporting Initiative Generating Stations 69 Corporate Giving $23.7 million 3We follow the GRI guidelines for reporting our performance. Renewable Portfolio (hydro) 364 MW 3 Economic Development Contributions $2.7 million 4 2006 270A complete index of performance indicators begins on page48. All of the data supporting these indicators can be found on Pumped Storage 586 MW 4 1 Construction expenditures include those expenses listed in the Cash 2007 266 Renewable Portfolio (wind, solar) 1,504 MW 5our website – www.AEPsustainability.com. We also report Total Kilowatt-hour Sales (in millions) 206,000 2 Flow Statement. Supply chain purchased contracts and inventory system. 2008 249on electric utility industry-specific indicators. Total Assets (in billions) $ 50.5 3 Includes $11.8 million of AEP Foundation grants. 2009 121 4 U.S. Customers (year-end, in millions) 5.3 Includes all grants and contributions by utility units to support economic development. 2010 125 1 Generally Accepted Accounting Principles.AEP Service Territory 2 Represents nominal capacity; includes 270 MW of mothballed /de- Total System – Annual CO 2 Emissions ( in million metric tons ) commissioned generation, AEP’s interest in Ohio Valley Electric Corp., purchased power agreements and renewables. Market Price – Common Stock 2005 145.1 High $ 36.51 3 Excludes pumped storage; includes owned capacity and purchased power. Nameplate capacity. 2006 143.9 4 Nominal capacity. 2009 Low $ 24.00 2007 147.7 Year-End $ 34.79 5 Regulated wind and solar capacity online or under contract. Name- plate capacity. 2008 148.2 High $ 37.94 2009 129.7 AEP’s utility units operate as AEP Ohio, AEP Texas, Appalachian Power 2010 Low $ 28.17 2010 134.0 (in Virginia and West Virginia), AEP Appalachian Power (in Tennessee), Indiana Michigan Power, Kentucky Power, Public Service Company of Year-End $ 35.98 Oklahoma, and Southwestern Electric Power Co. (in Arkansas, Louisiana and east Texas). 2010 Ongoing Earnings Contribution 2010 Energy Sales The company is based in Columbus, Ohio. n Ohio Power 24 % n Residential 30 % n CSP 17 % n APCO 16 % n Industrial 28 % n SWEPCO 11 % n Commercial 25 % n Wholesale* 17 % n I&M 10 % n AEP Texas 8 % * Wholesale includes sales to municipal and cooperative power systems, n PSO 6 % other wholesale and miscellaneousThis report was printed by Sandy Alexander Inc., an ISO 14001:2004 certified printer with Forest Stewardship Council Chain of Custody certification, on 55 n Others 5 % retail sales.percent recycled paper, including 30 percent post-consumer waste, with vegetable-formulated inks. CSP (Columbus Southern Power) n Kentucky Power 3 % APCO (Appalachian Power Co.) I&M (Indiana Michigan Power) PSO (Public Service Company of Oklahoma) SWEPCO (Southwestern Electric Power Co.)© 2011 American Electric Power Co., Inc.
  4. 4. www.AEPsustainability.com Index of Topics 2 A Message from the Chairman & CEO Michael G. Morris 6 Leadership, Management & Strategy 12 Business Performance: Financial 16 Business Performance: Energy Security, Reliability & Growth 22 Environmental Performance: Environment 28 Environmental Performance: Climate Change 32 Social Performance: Work Force 38 Social Performance: Public Policy 42 Social Performance: Stakeholder Engagement 47 Corporate & Shareholder Information 48 GRI Table of Contents / Key Indicators Forward-Looking InformationStatement of the AEP Board of DirectorsThe AEP Board of Directors has assigned the responsibility for report have been the subject of active discussion at the Board andmonitoring and overseeing the company’s sustainability initiatives Committee meetings. All members of the Board reviewed the re-to the Board’s Committee on Directors and Corporate Governance. port in detail and at the conclusion of this review process the BoardLast year, the Committee supported the integration of sustainability of Directors adopted a formal resolution approving the report.reporting with financial reporting and provided management with The Board believes this document is a reasonable and trans-guidance for the proposed approach to the corporate accountabil- parent presentation of the company’s plans and of its environmen-ity report. Stakeholders expressed approval and appreciation for tal, social and financial performance. The Board has emphasized toAEP’s leadership with this integrated approach to corporate report- management that it will continue to be evaluated by its success ining and we continue it this year. executing the company’s strategic plan to meet stakeholders’ and The Committee and AEP management thoroughly reviewed the Board’s expectations, including being agile in responding tothe company’s sustainability objectives, challenges, targets and changing circumstances while respecting the commitments madeprogress and reported the results of the reviews to the full Board. in this report.The Committee reviewed and discussed the final text of this reportbefore recommending its approval by the full Board of Directors. The AEP Board of Directors receives frequent reports bothfrom management and from the Committee on Directors and Cor-porate Governance about the company’s sustainability initiatives Lester A. Hudson, Jr.and from management and Board committees about the compa- Presiding Director of the AEP Board of Directorsny’s financial reporting and economic performance. Topics in this April 5, 2011 2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report 1
  5. 5. A Message from the Chairman & CEODear Friends: the way in which we interact with our cus- tomers. All options are being analyzed andTo grow, prosper and remain sustainable, when our plan is complete, we will share it.we must embrace change and transforma- We expect natural gas will play a largertion. Change requires leadership, courage role as shale reserves are developed. Weand an open culture. Transformation de- expect gas suppliers to responsibly ad-mands candor, trust and collaboration as we dress environmental and safety issues.engage with many different stakeholders to Other energy sources also will play a biggerfind the best solutions. Above all, sustaina- role, including renewable resources wherebility requires shared commitment, clear in- they are accepted, nuclear power, hydrotent and a solid plan of action. The changes power, demand response programs andunder way at AEP will transform our opera- energy efficiency. Transmission will be ations, reduce our environmental impacts more critical resource, too. Consequently,and ensure our long-term financial health. our capital investments will shift as we Our sustainability journey has already build natural gas plants, continue to investcarried us far. Our accomplishments in- in transmission and update aging equip-clude significant reductions in air emissions; ment. This strategy will benefit our custom-improved employee safety and health; ers, our investors, the environment and ourimproved system reliability; investments in technologies that will other stakeholders. But it will come at a cost.shape the future of energy production, transmission, distributionand use; the growth of our modern transmission business; reduc- Energy Policy Lackingtions in our own energy use; increases in our fuel diversity, includ- We are in desperate need of a comprehensive federal energy policying the use of renewable resources; sustainable dividends for our that addresses environmental concerns and energy security andshareholders; a stronger balance sheet; new partnerships with establishes a long-term energy strategy for the nation. Only a coor-many stakeholders; and improved service to our customers. We dinated national plan can ensure our energy security and reliability.are proud of these achievements. Without it, energy-related decisions will, out of necessity, be more But the future looks much different than before. The road tactical than strategic.ahead is paved with significant challenges for our company and If the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) proposedour customers that were not on the radar even three years ago. A rule to control mercury and other emissions is a harbinger of thecombination of factors is forcing us to look at our business in a new agency’s plans for several other regulations, our transformationlight. Key drivers include eroding tolerance by customers for rate may be accelerated, but with serious financial consequences. Itincreases; denial by state regulators to recover our investments in most certainly will increase our costs to comply as well as what ourcarbon capture and renewable energy; slow economic recovery customers pay for electricity.in most of our states; more complex and stringent environmental Let me be clear: We support the Clean Air Act. But the EPA’sregulations that will push customer rates still higher; the rising cost process and timelines are not realistic, and that is what we taketo operate older, less efficient coal units; the cost-competitiveness issue with. We support rational environmental regulation that pro-of natural gas compared with other fuels; a dramatically different vides significant public health and environmental benefits. Butpolitical landscape; and new concerns about the future of nuclear compliance requirements must be affordable and at an achiev-power in the wake of the Japanese nuclear crisis. able pace. Already, we know that compliance with the proposed We are developing a transition plan that addresses grid reli- new hazardous air pollutants rule on the prescribed timeline will beability, customer bill impacts, sustainable job creation and the need extremely difficult and will prompt premature retirements of somefor a more diverse fuel portfolio in the future. It will also transform coal units across the country.2 A Message from the Chairman & CEO
  6. 6. www.AEPsustainability.comWe are in desperate need of a comprehensive federal energy policy thataddresses environmental concerns and energy security and establishes along-term energy strategy for the nation. The price tag could be staggering; we won’t know the final cost AEP Dividend History until all of the regulations are finalized, but we estimate the cost of Compound Annual Growth Rate = 4.0% ( $ /share )compliance under the EPA’s timeline could be more than doublewhat we have spent so far for environmental controls. Our concern 2004 $ 1.40 is the failure to consider all of the regulations in total, rather than 2005 $ 1.42one-by-one. This impedes our ability to determine which coal unitshave to be closed and which will remain in service. This uncertainty 2006 $ 1.50 complicates our resource planning. We also are deeply concerned 2007 $ 1.58 that the EPA’s process does not consider the loss of jobs and com- 2008 $ 1.64 munity tax revenues and the impact of higher electric rates, espe- 2009 $ 1.64 cially on low-income customers and electric-intensive industries. We hope the EPA will listen to our feedback. A few changes to 2010 $ 1.71 the combined rules would bring tremendous value, allowing us to 2011 Projected $ 1.84 achieve compliance without harming local and national economies. n Subject to Board of Directors approval Global warming continues to be a concern and one that mustbe addressed internationally. Our position on this issue has notchanged. No single country or company can solve it. It is our funda- technology be brought to maturity and demonstrated on a com-mental belief that the best way to address this issue is through inter- mercial scale if we want to maintain coal as an option in a carbon-national collaboration. That’s why in 2011 we signed agreements constrained world. When there is a federal requirement and/orwith two of China’s largest energy companies to support knowl- adequate funding to support CCS, AEP is up to the challenge. Butedge and technology exchanges related to carbon capture and grid without these assurances, the future of our project is very unclear.developments. We also believe that, here in the United States, the We need other options for coal, too. That’s why the John W.best way to address climate change is through legislation. Turk, Jr., ultra-supercritical coal plant under construction in south- The lack of a strategic energy policy also hampers the devel- west Arkansas is important. Once complete, this will be one of theopment and deployment of new and expensive technologies that most efficient coal plants in the United States. It is also the firstwe need to address climate change. Without a legislative mandate, application of this technology in this country.regulators are telling us loud and clear that they are not willing topay for them. AEP took the global lead and the financial risk to Balancing All Stakeholder Needsadvance carbon capture and storage (CCS) because this tech- We are engaged in candid, ongoing discussions with regulators,nology is critical if we are serious about reducing carbon dioxide legislators and many other stakeholders about our concerns. Theseemissions. But regulators in Virginia rejected our request to recover are difficult and complicated issues, and there are no easy solu-costs associated with the project. We are still evaluating a regula- tions. If we work together, we think the outcome can be positivetory decision on the project from West Virginia. We learned a lot for stakeholders, customers, the environment and society. Wefrom our 20-megawatt (MW) CCS validation project at the Moun- believe sensible regulation and policy can be crafted that balancestaineer Plant in West Virginia, enhancing our knowledge of the pro- the costs and benefits. If done right, it would create jobs and eco-cess and technology. But substantial financial challenges remain. nomic opportunity, achieve the long-term environmental goals, and Through a joint funding effort with the U.S. Department of spread the costs over time to avoid unnecessary financial hardshipEnergy’s Clean Coal Power Initiative Round 3, we have begun geo- for customers. We will continue to connect with our stakeholderslogic, engineering and design work for a commercial-scale 235- and seek their input as we move forward.MW project that could be operational by 2015. We also recently We are preparing to undergo a transformation that will signifi-received $4 million from the Global Carbon Capture & Storage Insti- cantly change our business. Our responsibility is to manage andtute in Australia to support engineering work. It is essential that this reduce our environmental impacts as we deliver reliable electricity 2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report 3
  7. 7. Our 2010 earnings of $ 3.03 per share on anongoing basis were at the upper end of our AEP Chairman & CEO Mike Morrisprojected range and exceeded 2009 ongoing addresses the U.S.-China Strategicearnings per share of $ 2.97 . Our total share- Forum on Clean Energy Cooperationholder return was nearly 9 percent for 2010 . in Washington, D.C., in January 2011.to customers. We will increase our earnings potential as we invest steady, solid, competitive return in today’s marketplace.in our existing distribution and generation infrastructure and expand I am delighted that, twice last year, our board of directorsthe transmission grid inside and outside of our service territory. We voted to increase the quarterly dividend to shareholders. The totalwill do it by developing our work force to build, operate and main- quarterly dividend increase of 12 percent helped to keep our totaltain new technologies essential to our success. We also are com- shareholder return competitive and allowed us to reward our share-mitted to engaging our stakeholders in honest and open dialogue holders until our earnings growth can accelerate from increasedabout our plans while doing a better job of informing our customers capital investment and sales growth. It was a thrill to ring the clos-about the cost and value of electricity. ing bell at the New York Stock Exchange in June 2010 in celebra- Our business transformation touches every one of our oper- tion of AEP’s 400th consecutive quarterly dividend payment, a rareating companies, customers, shareholders, employees, communi- occurrence indeed. On March 10, 2011, we paid our 403rd con-ties, legislators and regulators. To be successful, we must continue secutive quarterly dividend to our shareholders.to deliver strong earnings this decade and beyond; we cannot meetour commitments unless we have the resources to do so. Operational Performance Operating more efficiently and adapting to the changing economic2010 Financial Performance and regulatory environment requires our work force to change, too.We achieved strong financial results last year, in part due to aggres- We reduced our work force by more than 2,400 employees in 2010sive cost cutting and favorable weather. We also rewarded our in a realignment of our cost structure with a slow but steady eco-shareholders with higher dividends. Our continued financial health nomic recovery. Most of those who left did so voluntarily.and ability to create long-term value for shareholders depends upon I am pleased to report that, despite this restructuring andour ability to transform our earnings as we transform our company. associated distractions, our overall safety performance was excel- As we shift our focus from coal generation to resource diver- lent. AEP employees share a deep commitment to safety andsity and the efficient delivery of energy through transmission and health and strive to live up to that commitment every day. I am pro-grid investments, we also will transform the earnings stream of the foundly grateful to our employees and our leadership for their dedi-company. That is our integrated plan for growth. cation to safety and health. No employee lost his or her life while The actions we took during the past two years put us on the working for AEP in 2010, fewer employees were harmed on the jobroad to slow and steady growth this year. Revenue increased to and the severity of injuries was at a near-record low. Our board of$14.4 billion from $13.5 billion in 2009, largely due to successful directors passed a resolution commending employees for perform-rate cases, which allowed for recovery of capital already invested ing at a level that was among the best in our company’s history.and for incremental costs such as fuel. Weather and a 5 percent We have made significant progress, but we can and will dorebound in industrial sales also helped revenues. better to improve our safety and health record. Three employees Operations and maintenance (O&M) expenditures for the en- lost their lives on the job during the past five years. We will not tol-tire system, on a Generally Accepted Accounting Principles basis, erate any compromise of safety standards, and we will continue toincreased $449 million in 2010. The increase primarily related to work hard to achieve and maintain zero harm.$293 million (pretax) of severance costs due to our cost reduc- Our environmental performance is excellent: We are a top per-tion initiatives and $114 million (pretax) of expenses associated with former in our industry by almost every measure. We are proud thatdollar-for-dollar rate recovery. Our capital investments of $2.2 billion this performance is outstanding for a utility of our size and scope.were down from almost $2.5 billion in 2009 as we responded to However, we fell short of our goal of zero environmental violations.regulator and customer concerns about rate increases. In 2010, we had three violations and paid minimal fines of less than Our 2010 earnings of $3.03 per share on an ongoing basis $10,000. As we learn from these events and take steps to preventwere at the upper end of our projected range and exceeded 2009 recurrences, our goal continues to be zero violations.ongoing earnings per share of $2.97. Our total shareholder return Our distribution system reliability improved in 2010. The aver-was nearly 9 percent for 2010, providing investors in AEP with a age length of time that customers were without power and the fre-4 A Message from the Chairman & CEO
  8. 8. www.AEPsustainability.com AEP Chairman & CEO Mike Morris and other AEP leaders ring the NYSE’s closing bell on June 3, 2010, in celebration of the company’s 400th consecutive dividend. AEP Total Shareholder Return 2005 12.3 % 2006 19.6 % 2007 13.1 % 2008 – 25.4 % 2009 10.4 % 2010 8.7 % quency of interruptions improved significantly, helping us to achieve critical global energy resource for the future.our best performance in five years. Our gridSMART ® initiative, un- Finally, a few personal notes. I have tried to prepare for theder way in four states, will transform our relationship with our cus- future since my first day here in 2004. We created an extensivetomers from one in which the customer uses power and gets a bill succession planning initiative to broaden the knowledge and skillsto one in which we work together to save electricity, lower energy of our executives and to ensure that the most qualified candidatedemand and consumption, and reduce customer costs. takes the helm when I step down as CEO. I am very proud that this Our transmission strategy to expand inside and outside of our process resulted in the board having external candidates and fourservice territory also moved forward. Among our successes were strong internal candidates from which to choose. The board namedthe establishment of transmission companies in Ohio, Michigan Nick Akins as president of AEP, and he will work closely with me thisand Oklahoma. Applications are pending in West Virginia, Kentucky year as I continue in the roles of chairman and CEO. If the succes-and Indiana. sion plan continues according to schedule, Nick will also become CEO later this year.Preparing for the Future Two long-time board members will retire this year, bringing yetWe all have a role in ensuring the quality of our energy future. We more change to our leadership team. We are most grateful for thebelieve that our customers want to use energy more efficiently, and dedicated service of Donald M. Carlton and E.R. “Dick” Brooks,in most of our service territories, programs and technology are both of whom have served since 2000. Prior to the 2000 merger ofhelping them to accomplish this goal. Moving forward, we want to AEP and Central and South West Corp. (CSW), Dick was CEO ofoperate our system more efficiently; diversify our fuel generation; CSW for nearly 10 years. Both board members have been passion-develop a more robust grid to enable the utilization of cleaner, more ate advocates for employee safety, our nuclear program and ourefficient and economic energy; and prepare for the electrification of company’s tradition of excellence in governance.the transportation sector. We are in a time of great transformation. Our vision for cleaner, We have many initiatives under way that position us to achieve more affordable and more reliable electricity is central to America’sthese goals. We will also work to prepare our regulators, employ- economic recovery and growth. As a nation, we must embraceees, customers and communities for the full impact of coal unit energy as a powerful engine for our country’s economic future; asclosings, new environmental mandates and the true cost of clean a company, we must strive continually to balance the needs of ourenergy. We are ready to listen to ideas they may have for solu- customers and shareholders with measurable benefits to the envi-tions to these complex problems. We will continue to communicate ronment and society. The men and women of AEP are making boldthese issues with our stakeholders and collaborate with them to changes that will lead us toward a more secure energy future; Ifind common ground and pursue common sense solutions. invite you to join us in leading this exciting transformation. We are saddened by the terrible loss of life and destructionassociated with the earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan in Sincerely,March. We are also concerned about the events at the FukushimaDaiichi Nuclear Station in northeastern Japan. Although all the les-sons to be learned are not yet known, AEP remains committed tolearn from these events and to operate our Cook Nuclear Plant to Michael G. Morrisone standard – “Excellence.” We also believe that it would be unfor- Chairman & Chief Executive Officertunate and inappropriate to discount nuclear energy as a viable and April 2011 2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report 5
  9. 9. Leadership, Management & StrategyAn Integrated, Stakeholder-Informed Strategy trend to continue in 2011, we are taking steps through the regula-The connections between our environmental, financial and social tory process to address this while entering the competitive mar-performance are central to our strategy and to our thinking about ket ourselves. Our new AEP Retail Energy business has initiatedwho we are and what we do. The more we align and integrate our retail marketing efforts in our service territory as well as otheractivities in these three areas, the more successful we will be. service territories in Ohio. Read more about this in Public Policy. For more than 100 years, AEP has provided affordable, reliable Employee and other human-resource issues remain vitallyelectricity for our customers; steady, competitive returns for our important. We are focused on a strategy that ensures we canshareholders; and safe, rewarding jobs for our employees. While attract and retain the talent we will need to build, operate and main-doing so, we have worked to protect the environment and to sup- tain new technologies and interactive energy supply-and-demandport the communities in which we operate. systems, such as our gridSMART ® initiative. The link between our environmental and financial performance Our extensive stakeholder engagement process has helped tohas become much stronger and clearer to us during the past sev- inform our business strategy, and it has begun to produce syner-eral years. Environmental issues became a larger part of our risk gies and business opportunities for us. We are discovering thatportfolio, and our performance as a company began to be seen, many of the lines we had drawn separating financial from nonfinan-at least in part, in terms of our ability to address global climate cial strategies, activities and reporting are no longer relevant and,change. We have made major investments in environmental con- in some cases, are counterproductive.trols at many of our coal-fired plants, which have resulted in reduc- In response, we have worked to embed and integrate environ-tions in sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide emissions by about 80 mental and societal issues and performance into our strategy, ourpercent since 1980. While there is a clear environmental benefit, operations and our measurement and reporting systems. For ex-these investments have also led to major rate increases for our cus- ample, in our Engineering, Projects & Field Services organization,tomers. At the same time, we have led the way in testing and de- the annual business plan is based on our sustainability strategy, andploying new technologies that will make us more efficient, give cus- we’ve designed goal-setting and performance systems that em-tomers more control over energy use, enable modernization of the phasize the connection between each employee’s job and our com-grid and further reduce our environmental impacts. pany’s overall environmental, social and financial performance. AEP was presented with a new challenge in 2010. In Ohio,customers have had a choice for generation service since 2001, Strategic Transformationbut 2010 was the first year in which we have seen active retail mar- The ancient Greek philosopher Heraclitus said, “The only constantketing that targets our commercial customers. While we expect this is change.” He could have been describing the electric utility indus- try and AEP in particular. We are in the midst of a fundamental transformation, including:Construction continues on the John W. Turk, Jr., coal plant, which is scheduled Our operations are increasingly integrated: Our operating com-to begin operations in 2012. pany presidents are responsible for business performance across generation, transmission and distribution. Consequently, these business units are working more closely and sharing goals and accountability for overall performance at the operating company level. The company presidents are actively involved with resource planning, cash flow, balance sheets, income statements and stake- holder relationships. This business model allows the company presidents to align investment decisions with financial, regulatory and operational priorities and to manage our social and environ- mental performance in an integrated fashion. Our fuel mix is changing: We are a coal-centric electric utility, but6 Leadership, Management & Strategy
  10. 10. www.AEPsustainability.comThe ancient Greek philosopher Heraclitus said, “The only constant is change.”He could have been describing the electric utility industry and AEP inparticular. We are in the midst of a fundamental transformation.that is changing. We plan to invest in cost-effective environmental employee tool for providing that assurance. We also communicateretrofits of larger, newer coal-burning units and retire older, smaller with employees regularly about ethics and compliance via e-mails,units. We eventually will build more natural gas generation, similar videos, the company’s intranet and a dedicated ethics and compli-to the 508-megawatt (MW) J. Lamar Stall combined-cycle gas unit ance blog for employees. Read more about the culture of ethicsin Louisiana, which began operating in 2010, and the 580-MW and compliance in Work Force.Dresden combined-cycle gas plant under construction in Ohio. We have a deep commitment to succession planning and dur-We are completing the ultra-supercritical John W. Turk, Jr., Plant ing the past five years, several senior executives were given differ-in Arkansas. ent assignments to expose them to all aspects of the company’sTechnology is changing: We continue to explore different and new operations. This process resulted in four internal executives beingtechnologies that could play a pivotal role in how electricity is pro- considered by the board of directors as potential candidates toduced, distributed and used. Our gridSMART ® projects in Ohio, succeed Mike Morris as president and CEO of AEP.Texas, Oklahoma and Indiana are giving us practical experience in In late December, after reviewing internal and external can-smart grid technologies, from energy storage and distributed gen- didates, the board appointed Nick Akins, who previously led oureration to smart meters and voltage control. While we are learning Generation business, as president of AEP. If the succession plana lot about these technologies, customers have yet to fully under- continues on schedule, the board will name Nick CEO later thisstand how to take advantage of them. We will pursue the deploy- year. Until then, he will work closely with Mike and with Vice Chair-ment of smart grid technologies where regulators are supportive. man Carl English.Our culture is changing: We strive for openness, candor and trust The board’s Committee on Directors & Corporate Governancein all areas, especially as they relate to safety and health. For ex- has oversight over this report and provides input and guidanceample, when job conditions change, employees know they must to management on selected issues. The board holds manage-stop and re-evaluate the risk. We have not yet achieved the level ment accountable for sustainability and financial performance, asof openness we strive for, but the change in our culture has been described in a board statement that is published every year in thissignificant. Read more about this in Stakeholder Engagement. report. The board receives semiannual updates on our progress,Our values continue to guide us: Our values of safety, fairness, although discussion occurs throughout the year.trustworthiness, responsibility, citizenship, respect and caring con- Our efforts to make AEP a leader in corporate governancetinue to commit us to high standards of ethics and quality. Even were recognized in 2010 when AEP was named one of the 20as our strategies and operations evolve in order to help us remain “Most Responsible Corporations” in the United States by Gov-successful, our core business mission and objectives are the same ernanceMetrics International. The ranking was based on boardas they have always been. accountability, internal controls, shareholder rights, remuneration,Changes in Leadership, Governance & Management AEP President Nick Akins and other corporate governanceOur leadership and management structure also is in transition. codes and principles. AEP wasLeadership takes many forms. One of them is the ability to deal specifically cited for its extensiveeffectively with change by having vision, setting a clear direction, reporting on environmental andaligning human and financial resources, and motivating people to social performance.move forward. We believe that AEP is fortunate to have a leader-ship team that is prepared to deal with today’s enormous changes. Risk Management Our conduct is guided by our Principles of Business Conduct, AEP faces a variety of risks relatedwhich require us to operate with integrity, fairness, respect and to environmental and other publiccare. We seek to foster an environment in which employees know policy issues, safety in the work-their concerns are addressed respectfully, confidentially and in a place, grid security, financial andtimely manner. Our “24/7” confidential ethics hotline is an important operational performance, and 2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report 7
  11. 11. other matters that could affect the company’s competitiveness or the Kleen Energy Plant natural gas explosion in Connecticut, wereputation. Effective risk management enables us to respond and reviewed the startup procedure for the new J. Lamar Stall naturaladapt quickly and effectively in the rapidly changing environment gas plant to ensure that safety zones were properly established.described in this report. We developed a template for this review that we will use to conduct We continuously examine our levels of acceptable risk based similar inspections at all of our gas plants.on changes in the internal and external operating environment We benchmark our business continuity plans against thoseand on specific circumstances. We weigh the potential impact of of our peers, recently using the Edison Electric Institute Busi-various risks on our financial health and reputation and on our abil- ness Continuity Benchmark survey. This year, we plan to focusity to comply with legal and regulatory requirements. Our manage- on improving our business leaders’ understanding of their roles inment team and board of directors discuss these issues and weigh business continuity activities, refreshing existing plans, improvingour risk management options on an ongoing basis. communication capabilities and setting a five-year road map for Our Enterprise Risk Oversight group develops and applies continuous improvement.enterprisewide risk management tools. It gathers and analyzes We are also taking a closer look at our disaster recoveryrisk-related information from business units and reports to the Risk systems, which emphasize recovery of technology systems if weExecutive Committee and the Audit Committee of the board of were to experience a catastrophic failure. AEP maintains a 24/7directors. This enables management and the board to understand, IT Disaster Recovery Center that makes it possible for us to con-evaluate and respond to the significant risks facing the company. tinue operations in the event of a disaster. Although our disaster Our Risk Executive Committee meets regularly to monitor the recovery infrastructure is continuously monitored and is in a statematerial and emerging risks facing the company. It reviews and of readiness, we will analyze the recovery prioritization of businessevaluates the response to these risks and will request risk mitiga- processes to ensure those priorities reflect today’s business envi-tion from business unit leaders, if necessary. ronment and needs. Risk management occurs at all levels of AEP. Individual busi-ness units are responsible for identifying, analyzing and assess- Stakeholder Engagement & Material Issuesing their risks and for implementing appropriate risk management A sustainable business strategy is one that is informed, engagedcontrols. For example, we manage fuel inventory and purchases to and forward looking. The dialogues that inform our decision makingbalance supply needs with the ability to secure regulatory recov- and long-term strategic view often result in collaborative efforts thatery of fuel costs at each power plant. This localized approach to are good for people, the environment, the economy and sharehold-risk management reduces the likelihood that a power plant will run ers. We conducted or participated in nine stakeholder meetingsshort of fuel and reduces risk to our shareholders and customers. during 2010 that provided us with insights about a wide range of In 2010, we began to track our sustainability commitments in issues that are important to us, our customers and our industry.relation to the company’s material risks. When reporting progress, These meetings helped shape this report. For a description of ourbusiness units are asked to identify actions that may create risks material issues, visit www.AEPsustainability.com.for the company. This ensures alignment of goals and actions andhelps to identify emerging issues and trends. It also helps to informgoal setting and decision making. Scope of This Report Business readiness for high impact/low probability events has This is our second integrated report, combining information aboutalways been important, but it came under increased scrutiny in the our financial performance with data on our environmental, social andwake of the Deepwater Horizon oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico, the governance performance. It also is the fifth year we are reporting onUpper Big Branch mining disaster in West Virginia and the nuclear our sustainability performance. We are committed to an integratedcrisis in Japan. reporting approach because it gives a complete picture of how we AEP has business continuity and disaster recovery plans in operate, the decisions we make, the positions we take, our engage-place. Every business unit has a business continuity plan specific ment with stakeholders and the consequences of our actions.to its needs that addresses people, processes, property and other Information contained herein is largely based on calendar yearfactors. For example, we have plans to respond if a pandemic were 2010, with exceptions for some early 2011 data as noted. Support-to cause widespread employee absences and supply disruptions, ing information can be found on our dedicated sustainability web-which would affect our ability to serve our customers. site at www.AEPsustainability.com or on our corporate website at In our Fossil/Hydro unit, we use predictive maintenance tech- www.AEP.com.nologies such as vibration analysis and infrared thermography tohelp identify the potential for equipment failure in our power plants.In addition, we monitor industry experience to develop proac-tive approaches to minimizing our risks. For instance, following8 Leadership, Management & Strategy
  12. 12. www.AEPsustainability.comAEP Board of DirectorsMichael G. Morris Ralph D. Crosby, Jr. Lionel L. Nowell III Sara Martinez TuckerAge 64; Elected 2004 McLean, Va. Cos Cob, Conn. San Francisco, Calif.Chairman & Chief Executive Officer Age 63; Elected 2006 Age 56; Elected 2004 Age 56; Elected 2009E, P Chairman & retired Retired Senior Vice President Former Undersecretary, Chief Executive Officer, & Treasurer, U.S. Department of Education,E.R. Brooks EADS North America, Inc. PepsiCo, Inc. and former President &Granbury, Texas H, N, P A, D, E, F, P Chief Executive Officer,Age 73; Elected 2000 Hispanic Scholarship FundRetired Chairman & Linda A. Goodspeed Dr. Richard L. Sandor A, D, PChief Executive Officer, Franklin, Tenn. Chicago, Ill.Central and South West Corp. Age 49; Elected 2005 Age 69; Elected 2000 John F. TurnerA, F, P Vice President, Former Chairman, Chicago Moose, Wyo. Information Systems, Climate Exchange, Inc. Age 69; Elected 2008Dr. Donald M. Carlton Nissan North America E, F, P Managing Partner,Austin, Texas A, N, P Triangle X Ranch, andAge 73; Elected 2000 Dr. Kathryn D. Sullivan former Assistant Secretary,Retired President & Thomas E. Hoaglin Columbus, Ohio U.S. State DepartmentChief Executive Officer, Columbus, Ohio Age 59; Elected 1997 A, N, PRadian International, LLC Age 61; Elected 2007 Director, Battelle Center forH, N, P Retired Chairman & Mathematics & Science Committees of The Board: Chief Executive Officer, Education Policy, John Glenn The chairman is listed in ( ).James F. Cordes Huntington Bancshares, Inc. School of Public Affairs, A – Audit (Nowell)The Woodlands, Texas D, E, H, P The Ohio State University D – Directors and CorporateAge 70; Elected 2009 F, N, P Governance (Hoaglin)Retired Executive Vice President, Dr. Lester A. Hudson, Jr. E – Executive (Morris)The Coastal Corp. Charlotte, N.C. F – Finance (Sandor)D, H, P Age 71; Elected 1987 H – Human Resources (Hudson) Professor, McColl School N – Nuclear Oversight (Sullivan) of Business, Queens P – Policy (Carlton) University of Charlotte D, E, H, PLeft to right: Lionel L. Nowell III, Dr. Richard L. Sandor, James F. Cordes, Sara Martinez Tucker, E.R. Brooks, Dr. Donald M. Carlton, Linda A. Goodspeed, ThomasE. Hoaglin, Michael G. Morris, Ralph D. Crosby, Jr., Dr. Kathryn D. Sullivan, Dr. Lester A. Hudson, Jr., and John F. Turner. 2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report 9
  13. 13. The Business of Sustainability A View from Two Members of AEP’s Board of Directors A company’s governance and its environmental and social per- stands what it takes for a company to have sustainable success. formance are increasingly linked to the bottom line. In fact, in In our case that includes financial performance because that’s many instances the distinction between financial and nonfinan- what our investors demand. At the board level, it starts by select- cial information is disappearing. A wide variety of stakeholders, ing the right CEO, making sure the organization has a good suc- including shareholders, financial analysts and rating agencies, cession plan, ensuring the organization has a strategy that can are working to understand the potential impacts of environmental yield, over time, success that is sustainable, and overseeing the and social issues on core business functions. Many consider the company’s risk management processes. Increasingly, however, distinction between financial and nonfinancial information to be factors such as adherence to environmental needs and regula- artificial and counterproductive in this effort. tions, safety issues and the reliability of operations contribute to AEP is very familiar with this evolution. Electricity is vital to the financial success of the organization. Without focus on those quality of life and is the nexus of societal needs and consider- issues that are so important to sustainable results, you only have ations that include public policy, environmental performance, half a loaf. And I think that’s why our board is so fundamentally financial health, operational reliability and economic prosperity. aware of and committed to the importance of sustainability. We take these responsibilities very seriously and know that they These topics are discussed regularly in full board meetings and are interdependent. in most committee meetings. The convergence of financial and nonfinancial perfor- mance has created a dynamic and more complex portfolio of Lionel Nowell: Without question, the board is committed to AEP risks and opportunities that is getting closer scrutiny throughout being a responsible corporate citizen and embraces sustainabil- the company, including in the board room. We asked two AEP ity as a core value and operating principle. We believe that having board members to share their views on these issues. Read the a self-regulating mechanism helps the company ensure that its full interview online at www.AEPsustainability.com/ourissues/ business practices reflect responsibility for, and are in compli- strategymgmntgov.aspx. ance with, environmental, social and economic standards, which is the right thing to do and a prerequisite for success. Through Tom Hoaglin is chairman of the board’s Committee on Directors discussions held at the Committee on Directors and Corporate and Corporate Governance, which has oversight of AEP’s Cor- Governance and subsequent full board meetings, we address porate Accountability Report. He is the retired chief executive of actions being taken by the company relative to our sustainabil- Huntington Bancshares in Columbus, Ohio, and has served on ity commitments, and review appropriate data to ensure those AEP’s board since 2007. actions have a positive impact on our shareholders, our custom- ers, our employees, the environment and other stakeholders. Lionel Nowell is chairman of the board’s Audit Committee. He is Recent studies suggest equity analysts are starting to issue the retired senior vice president and treasurer of PepsiCo Inc., of more favorable ratings to companies that exhibit exemplary cor- Purchase, New York. He has served on AEP’s board since 2004. porate social responsibility practices in the same manner as financial performance. Furthermore, the board promotes the in- How is sustainability discussed and considered at the clusion of public interest into our decision-making process by board level? voluntarily eliminating business practices that are not consistent with our sustainability objectives. As a result, concern about sus- Tom Hoaglin: It is important that our board – any board – under- tainability influences our thinking and helps to shape our actions. Thomas E. Hoaglin10 Leadership, Management & Strategy
  14. 14. www.AEPsustainability.comLionel L. Nowell IIIAEP invests significant time and energy engaging with developing a framework for constructively examining our riskshareholders and many other stakeholders. What’s the assumptions so we can better understand how unexpectedboard’s perspective on this process? events could affect AEP. We also evaluate whether potential unanticipated events are real threats, potential opportunities, orTom Hoaglin: Within our industry there is an instinctive aversion both. Our overall objective is to avoid blind spots by being moreby some company executives to working with stakeholders such proactive. So we have put in place a dynamic risk review pro-as environmental groups. Yet, I have been so impressed with cess, stewarded by the Audit Committee but owned by the fullAEP’s approach, as I think the whole board has, that we rec- board, which allows us to create a portfolio of strategic optionsognize the importance of this engagement. We encourage and that prepares the company to be both resilient and responsive tosupport management’s efforts to reach out to these constituen- threats and open and agile enough to seize upon opportunities.cies, make themselves accessible, keep lines of communication The board is fully and fundamentally aware of AEP’s respon-open and listen to their viewpoints and consider them in deci- sibility to comply with laws and regulations and to deliver energysion making. We may not always agree, but their point of view is to our customers in the most efficient manner. We are alwaysimportant to us. I think we are all aware that our generation fleet looking to develop a competitive advantage in managing andwill migrate, over time, to being less coal-centric, but we have to operating the company. Although this is a company with growthdo it at a pace that is digestible for regulators and our customers. potential, our ongoing risk will be our ability to achieve everythingThe way to get the optimal pace and plan includes making sure we have to do in a way that will meet the desires of our stake-we hear the points of view from all of our stakeholders. holders while creating value for our shareholders.Lionel Nowell: I agree with Tom. The common thread is having Tom Hoaglin: AEP has a very organized, disciplined approachconstructive, open and honest communication. We want to col- within its executive ranks to manage risk, which has servedlaborate and have a dialogue because that helps us to come up us very well. The board itself is not directly involved in manag-with solutions that can be mutually beneficial to all concerned ing the company’s risks; our role is to oversee the processesparties. And I believe the effectiveness of our approach is sug- management uses to manage risks. The management team isgested by our success in the regulatory arena and the fact that responsible for identifying short- and long-term risks facing thewe received no shareholder resolutions this year. Ultimately, our organization and for assigning responsibility and accountabilityongoing challenge is to help all of our stakeholders, including for managing and mitigating those risks. Each of the board’sour shareholders, understand that we have to work together and committees is assigned the appropriate risks to oversee in con-respect each other’s goals and objectives if we are going to be cert with management. We receive regular updates to ensureeffective in delivering safe, reliable and affordable electricity to that the risks we all agreed upon are getting the right attentioncustomers and fair returns to our shareholders while meeting our and are being mitigated. And that’s what our investors wouldsocial responsibilities. expect and require, and I think all stakeholders would expect that. After all, a company that manages risk successfully is likelyRisk assessment and risk mitigation have become in- to have fewer blips along the way and deliver a much higher levelcreasingly high priorities for many companies, including of performance.AEP. What is the board’s role in risk management? Read more about the board’s view of ethics, compliance andLionel Nowell: Risk oversight is one of the top priorities for both board independence online at www.AEPsustainability.com.the board and AEP management. While we have always focusedon risk, we’ve taken additional steps to improve the process by 2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report 11
  15. 15. Earnings Per Share ( GAAP ) Total Debt / Capitalization ( GAAP ) 2008 $ 3.43 2005 57.2 % 2009 $ 2.96 2006 59.1 % 2010 $ 2.53 2007 60.7% 12% 2008 62.5 % 57.2 % total quarterly 2009 2010 57.0 % dividend increase in 2010Business Performance: FinancialA financially strong and responsible company is one that deliv- able cost. This allows us to continue to invest low-cost debt capital ers profits to its shareholders, meets its commitments to its into our critical electric infrastructure to better serve our customers. lenders and provides benefits to society. The actions we We must prioritize our spending to secure solid investment-grade have taken during the past two years put AEP in a posi- ratings by striking the right balance between the cost of operationstion to do all three. Being financially strong allows us to deliver on and these financial objectives.our social and environmental commitments. Improving our environ- Our board of directors approved two shareholder dividend in-mental and social performance helps us to increase our financial creases in 2010, which resulted in a total quarterly dividend increasestrength. We believe that our strategy and approach provide value of 12 percent. This provided shareholders additional cash return onfor shareholders, stakeholders and society. their invested capital during a period when the company was expe- The sluggish economy was a factor in both business and poli- riencing lower sales and earnings growth than in pre-recessiontics. Decreased demand for electricity from the highs of 2007 periods. This improvement in the dividend increased our payoutand 2008, regulatory delays and environmental challenges com- ratio to nearly 60 percent, which is at the upper end of our targetedpelled us to rethink how we manage our operations and where we payout ratio of 50 percent to 60 percent.make our investments. Regulators also demonstrated that they are AEP reached a milestone in June 2010 when it paid its 400thunwilling to approve rate increases for some renewable and envi- consecutive quarterly dividend. We are proud to have paid a divi-ronmental initiatives without a legal mandate to do so. Virginia and dend every quarter since mid-1910, which, according to our re-Kentucky regulators did not allow us to include renewable energy search, is an achievement only a few U.S. companies can claim.contracts in our rates, for example, citing cost as the main factor. Our record shows that management and the board of directors are Our actions to bolster our financial health during the past two committed to providing shareholders an important part of their totalyears helped to pave the way for long-term sustainable growth. Our return proposition through a cash dividend.goal is always to efficiently convert the capital investments we make Total shareholder return is an important performance metric.to better serve our customers and to deliver earnings for our inves- For 2010, our total return was approximately 8.7 percent, exceedingtors. Throughout AEP, we reduced our cost structure and brought the S&P 500 Utilities Index by more than 3 percentage points andmore discipline to operations and maintenance (O&M) and capital making an investment in AEP a stable and competitive return prop-spending. Through this discipline, we were able to improve our bal- osition accompanied by a low risk profile and steady performance.ance sheet and maintain adequate liquidity through the renewaland extension of a $1.5 billion bank facility. 2010 Consolidated Results Our credit ratings are at the investment grade level (BBB/Baa2/ AEP’s ongoing earnings for 2010 amounted to $1.45 billion, anBBB), which provides adequate access to debt capital at a reason- increase of nearly $90 million over our 2009 results. On a per-share12 Business Performance: Financial
  16. 16. www.AEPsustainability.com403 Ongoing Earnings Per Share History Compound Annual Growth Rate = 4.1% ( $ /share ) $ 2.33 $ 2.73 $ 2.77 $ 3.00 $ 3.24 $ 2.97 $ 3.03 $ 3.10number of consecutive quarterly dividends paid through March 2011 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 ForecastWe expect our earnings to grow at a rate of 4 percent to 6 percent over the 2012 to2014 time frame, underpinned by capital investments in our utilities leading to ratebase growth, continued increases in sales and the ability to earn competitive returnson equity in our operating companies.basis, 2010 ongoing earnings were $3.03, up $0.06 from 2009 lion. This was due in part to the winding down of our initial programresults of $2.97.1 At the end of 2010, AEP had 481 million common of mandated environmental retrofits at our power plants related toshares outstanding, an increase of 3 million shares from 2009. the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and the Clean Air Interstate Our balance sheet showed continued strength in 2010, as Rule. Environmental expenditures were still substantial, at $303our debt-to-total-capitalization ratio decreased to 57 percent, the million in 2010. The biggest area of capital spending was in our Dis-lowest debt-to-total-capitalization ratio that we have recorded for tribution business unit, where $808 million was invested in projectsseveral years. During the year, we accessed the capital markets related to customer service and reliability.for nearly $1.6 billion in debt, both short- and long-term, and in The ongoing recession made AEP’s contribution to local econ-June 2010, we renewed one of our $1.5 billion credit facilities for a omies more important than ever in 2010. We are among the largestthree-year term that is supported by a strong, diverse bank group. employers in the communities where we operate, and the taxesOur liquidity position remains strong and our credit metrics showed we generate are a major source of revenue to those communities.improvement during the year as well. AEP and its subsidiaries have AEP paid almost $1.2 billion in federal, state and local taxes in 2010stable outlooks from the rating agencies, with the exception of and employed nearly 19,000 people. Our annual payroll is moreactions taken with respect to the merger of Ohio Power and Colum- than $1.8 billion and positively impacts families, communities andbus Southern Power. economies in our service area. In 2010, we voluntarily contributed $500 million to our qualifiedpension plan, increasing the funding level to about 80 percent. Thiscontribution reduced our underfunded pension liability by approxi- Liquidity Summary ( in millions )mately 10 percent. We plan to voluntarily contribute an additional Amount* Maturity$158 million to the plan in 2011 and continue to examine ways to Revolving Credit Facility $ 1,454 April 2012 Revolving Credit Facility $ 1,500 June 2013reduce risks through asset allocation and risk management. Revolving Credit Facility $ 478 April 2011 Investing capital at levels that exceed our annual rate of depre- Total Credit Facilities $ 3,432ciation increases our earnings potential. Our capital investments Plusin 2010 totaled $2.2 billion, down from nearly $2.5 billion in 2009. Cash and Cash Equivalents $ 294This exceeded our annual depreciation of $1.29 billion but was Lesslower than our capital improvements in 2009 by nearly $250 mil- Commercial Paper Outstanding ( $ 650 ) Letters of Credit Issued ( $ 601 )1 2010 GAAP Net Income of $1.21 billion ($2.53 per share) compared with 2009 Net Available Liquidity $ 2,475 GAAP Net Income of $1.36 billion ($2.96 per share). * Actual Dec. 31, 2010 2011 AEP Corporate Accountability Report 13

×