Urban Sustainability

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  • 1. Instructor: Daniel Warshawsky Office: Hancock B56C Office Hours: MW 3-5pm or by appointment Phone: 213-740-2876 Email: warshaws@usc.edu Food Studies 2000x: Urban Sustainability Fall 2011, Tuesday and Thursday 2-3pm, Taper Hall 201The twenty-first century is commonly known as the urban century, as more people live in cities thanever before in human history. However, urbanization has been associated with the emergence of newurban challenges, such as growth of informal settlements, inadequate access to water and food, lack ofhealthy living spaces, climate change, and the energy crisis. Very often, urban sustainability is listed asone of society’s key challenges, as scholars, policy makers, and residents struggle to balance economic,social, and environmental concerns. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to theseconceptual debates and the real world case studies which urban residents confront. The first half of thiscourse exposes students to the various issues and theories which scholars and policymakers have used toconceptualize urban sustainability. The second half of this course uses real-world case studies from theGlobal North and the Global South as a way to investigate daily life in contemporary cities with a focuson health, nutrition, and food insecurity. In addition to the midterm and final examinations, students willbe required to write two course papers, with independent research a core component of the final paper.Course Objectives• Understand the different ways of conceptualizing urban sustainability• Recognize the real world challenges to produce sustainable cities• Understand concepts of authorship and representation when analyzing texts• Develop independent research skillsRequired Texts• Wheeler, S. and Beatley, T. 2009. The Sustainable Urban Development Reader. 2nd edition. London:Routledge.• Beall, J. and Fox, S. 2010. Cities and Development. London: Routledge.• Koc, M., MacRae, R., Mougeot, L. J. A., and Welsh, J. 1999. For Hunger Proof Cities. Ottawa, CA:International Development Research Centre.• Cohen, M. J. and Clapp, J. 2009. The Global Food Crisis: Governance Challenges and Opportunities.Waterloo, Canada: Wilfrid Laurier University Press.• A course reader will be available at the bookstore. 1
  • 2. Course ScheduleCOURSE PART I: CONCEPTUALIZING URBAN SUSTAINABILITYAugust 26 and August 31: IntroductionWheeler, S. and Beatley, T. 2009. The Sustainable Urban Development Reader. 2nd edition. London:Routledge. pp. 1-34.Beall, J. and Fox, S. 2010. Cities and Development. London: Routledge. pp. 22-54.Vos, R. O. 2007. “Defining sustainability: a conceptual orientation.” Perspective in Journal of ChemicalTechnology and Biotechnology 82 (4): 334-339.Sneddon, C. S. 2000. “‘Sustainability’ in Ecological Economics, Ecology and Livelihoods: A Review.”Progress in Human Geography 24 (4): 521-549.September 2 and September 7: Sustainable Cities in a Global PerspectiveWheeler, S. and Beatley, T. 2009. The Sustainable Urban Development Reader. 2nd edition. London:Routledge. pp. 35-66.Beall, J. and Fox, S. 2010. Cities and Development. London: Routledge. pp. 55-87.Satterthwaite, D. 2004. “The Key Issues and the Works Included.” The Earthscan Reader in SustainableCities. Satterthwaite, D., ed. London: Earthscan. pp. 3-22.McGranahan, D. and Satterthwaite, D. 2003. “Urban Centers: An Assessment of Sustainability.” AnnualReview of Environmental Resources 28 (1): 243-274.September 9 and September 14: City Growth and Land DevelopmentWheeler, S. and Beatley, T. 2009. The Sustainable Urban Development Reader. 2nd edition. London:Routledge. pp. 67-110 and 157-178.Beall, J. and Fox, S. 2010. Cities and Development. London: Routledge. pp. 88-123.Logan, J. R. and Molotch, H. 1978. Urban Fortunes: The Political Economy of Place. Berkeley:University of California Press. pp. 1-45.Peterson, P. E., Stone, C. N., and Sharp, E. B. 2005. “The Political Economy of Cities,” AmericanUrban Politics: The Reader. 4th edition. Judd, D. R. and Kantor, P., eds. New York: Longman. pp. 25-87 2
  • 3. September 16 and September 21: Appropriation of NatureWheeler, S. and Beatley, T. 2009. The Sustainable Urban Development Reader. 2nd edition. London:Routledge. pp. 111-115.Cronon, W. 1996. “The Trouble with Wilderness: Or, Getting Back to the Wrong Nature.”Environmental History 1 (1): 7-28.Wolch, J. 1996. “Zoopolis.” Capitalism, Nature, and Socialism 7 (2): 21-47.Lenzen, M. and Peters, G. M. 2010. “How City Dwellers Affect Their Resource Hinterland: a SpatialImpact Study of Australian Households.” Journal of Industrial Ecology 14 (1): 73-90.September 23 and September 28: Nature in Cities and Cities in NatureWheeler, S. and Beatley, T. 2009. The Sustainable Urban Development Reader. 2nd edition. London:Routledge. pp. 116-120.Beall, J. and Fox, S. 2010. Cities and Development. London: Routledge. pp. 159-191.Hough, M. 1995. Cities and Natural Process. London: Routledge. pp. 100-202.Robertson, M. M. 2004. “The Neoliberalization of Eco-system Services: Wetland Mitigation andProblems in Environmental Governance.” Geoforum 35 (3): 361-373.September 30 and October 5: Urban ConsumptionWheeler, S. and Beatley, T. 2009. The Sustainable Urban Development Reader. 2nd edition. London:Routledge. pp. 123-132.Princen, T. 2002. “Consumption and Its Externalities: Where Economy Meets Ecology.” ConfrontingConsumption. Princen, T., Maniates, M. and Conca, K., eds. Cambridge: MIT Press. pp. 23-42.Conca, K. 2002. “Consumption and Environment in a Global Economy.” Confronting Consumption.Princen, T., Maniates, M. and Conca, K., eds. Cambridge: MIT Press. pp. 133-153.Robbins, P. and Sharp, J. T. 2003. “Producing and Consuming Chemicals: The Moral Economy of theAmerican Lawn.” Economic Geography. 79 (4): 425-451.October 7 and October 12: Urban MetabolismWheeler, S. and Beatley, T. 2009. The Sustainable Urban Development Reader. 2nd edition. London:Routledge. pp. 133-140.Xuemai, B. 2007. “Industrial Ecology and the Global Impacts of Cities.” Journal of Industrial Ecology.11 (2): 1-6. 3
  • 4. Brunner, P. H. 2007. “Reshaping Urban Metabolism.” Journal of Industrial Ecology 11 (2): 11-13.Leach, M. A., Bauen, A., and Lucas, N. J .D. 1997. “A Systems Approach to Materials Flows inSustainable Cities: A Case Study of Paper.” Journal of Environmental Planning and Management 40(1): 7034-723.October 14: Midterm ExamCOURSE PART II: SUSTAINABLE SPACES & PLACES: FOCUS ON FOOD AND HEALTHOctober 19 and October 21: Environmental Justice and Human Health in the Global NorthWheeler, S. and Beatley, T. 2009. The Sustainable Urban Development Reader. 2nd edition. London:Routledge. pp. 141-156.Bullard, R. D. 2005. The Quest for Environmental Justice: Human Rights and the Politics of Pollution.Berkeley: University of California Press. pp. 1-67.Koc, M., MacRae, R., Mougeot, L. J. A., and Welsh, J. 1999. For Hunger Proof Cities. Ottawa, Canada:International Development Research Centre. pp. 1-64.Pulido, L., Sidawi, S., and Vos, R. O. 1996. “An Archeology of Environmental Racism in Los Angeles.”Urban Geography 17 (5): 419-439.Boone, C. G., Buckley, G. L., Grove, J., and Morgan, S. 2009. “Parks and People: An EnvironmentalJustice Inquiry in Baltimore, Maryland.” Annals of the Association of American Geographers 99 (4):767-787.October 26 and October 28: Measuring Green Sustainability Initiatives in the Global NorthWheeler, S. and Beatley, T. 2009. The Sustainable Urban Development Reader. 2nd edition. London:Routledge. pp. 179-198.Wolch, J. 2007. “Green Urban Worlds.” Association of American Geographers 97 (2): 373-384.Pastor, Jr., M., Lopez-Garza, M., Dreier, P., and Grigsby, III, J. E. 2000. Regions that Work: How Citiesand Suburbs Can Grow Together. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. pp. 1-24 and 95-140.McEvoy, D., Gibbs, D. C., and Longhurst, J. W. S. 2000. “The Employment Implications of a Low-Carbon Economy. Sustainable Development 8 (1): 27-38.November 2 and November 4: Local Sustainable Food Initiatives in the Global NorthGottlieb, R. and Joshi, A. 2010. Food Justice. Cambridge: MIT Press. pp. 1-54. 4
  • 5. Koc, M., MacRae, R., Mougeot, L. J. A., and Welsh, J. 1999. For Hunger Proof Cities. Ottawa, Canada:International Development Research Centre. pp. 65-100.Winne, M. 2008. Closing the Food Gap. Boston: Beacon Press. pp. 37-84.Block, D. and Kouba, J. 2006. “A Comparison of the Availability and Affordability of a Market Basketin Two Communities in the Chicago Area.” Public Health Nutrition 9 (7): 837–845.November 9 and November 11: Food Flows, Sustainability, and Development in the Global SouthPotter, R. B., Binns, T., Elliott, J. A., and Smith, D. 2009. “Globalization, Development, andUnderdevelopment.” Geographies of Development. Harlow, England: Pearson. pp. 126-180.Power, M. 2004. “Illuminating the Dark Side of Development” and “Resisting the Temptations ofRemedies, Mirages, and Fairy-Tales.” Rethinking Development Geographies. London: Routledge. pp.20-44 and 219-235.Crush, J. 1995. “Introduction: Power of Development.” Power of Development. Crush, J., ed. London:Routledge. pp. 1-26.Cohen, M. J. and Clapp, J. 2009. The Global Food Crisis: Governance Challenges and Opportunities.Waterloo, Canada: Wilfrid Laurier University Press. pp. 1-58.November 16 and November 18: Sustainability from the Perspective of the Urban SlumBeall, J. and Fox, S. 2010. Cities and Development. London: Routledge. pp. 124-158.Davis, M. 2006. Planet of Slums. New York: Verso. pp. 1-49.Potter, R. B., Binns, T., Elliott, J. A., and Smith, D. 2009. “Resources and the Environment”Geographies of Development. Harlow, England: Pearson. pp. 227-267.November 23: Week of Thanksgiving, Growing Sustainability through FilmKennedy, S. H. 2008. The Garden. Black Valley Films.November 30 and December 2: Local Sustainable Food Initiatives in the Global SouthLourenco-Lindell, I. 2001. “Social Networks and Urban Vulnerability to Hunger.” Associational Life inAfrican Cities. Tostensen, A., Tvedten, I., and Vaa, M., eds. Stockholm: Nordiska Afrikainstitutet. pp.30-45.Tinker, I. 1997. “The Street Food Project: Influencing Development.” Street Foods. Oxford: OxfordUniversity Press. pp. 147-195. 5
  • 6. Lynch, K. 2005. “Food.” Rural-Urban Interaction in the Developing World. London: Routledge. pp. 35-67.Desai, A. 2002. We Are the Poors. New York: Monthly Review Press. pp. 7-40.December 7 and 9: City Growth, Climate Change, and Sustainability in PerilMcGranahan, G., Balk, D., and Anderson, B. 2007. “The Rising Tide Assessing the Risks of ClimateChange and Human Settlements in Low Elevation Coastal Zones.” Environment and Urbanization19 (1): 17-37.Bulkeley, H. and Betsill, M. 2005. “Rethinking Sustainable Cities: Multilevel Governance and theUrban Politics of Climate Change.” Environmental Politics 14(1): 42-63.Cohen, M. J. and Clapp, J. 2009. The Global Food Crisis: Governance Challenges and Opportunities.Waterloo, Canada: Wilfrid Laurier University Press. pp. 129-178.Koc, M., MacRae, R., Mougeot, L. J. A., and Welsh, J. 1999. For Hunger Proof Cities. Ottawa, Canada:International Development Research Centre. pp. 129-154.December 14: Student Paper PresentationsDecember 20: Final Exam 6
  • 7. Course AssessmentAttendance and Participation (10 percent)Discussion will be an important part of the class, so you should come to class prepared with commentsand questions. Readings should be completed before coming to class to ensure that time is used aswisely as possible. Class attendance is mandatory. If you need to miss class for a health reason or familyemergency, you must present a documented excuse within a week of missing that class.Short Class Paper (15 percent): Due October 7Students will be asked to write a short 5 page paper comparing the various theoretical approaches tounderstanding urban sustainability. More details will be available once the paper assignment has beenprovided to students.Long Research Paper (30 percent): Due November 30Students will be asked to analyze one aspect of life in a world region using class materials and libraryresources to support their argument. This paper should be 10 pages long and should focus on a keyurban sustainability issue. Topic choice is flexible; however, students must have their paper topicsapproved by the instructor. Students will present their research findings to the class at the end of thesemester. More details will be available once the paper assignment has been provided to students afterthe midterm.Midterm Exam (20 percent): October 14The midterm exam will consist of short and long essays based on material covered in the first half of theclass.Final Exam (25 percent): December 20The final exam will consist of short and long essays based on material covered in the second half of theclass. 7