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At the Crossroads of Freedom and Equality
 

At the Crossroads of Freedom and Equality

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A presentation for Black History Month 2013 that will be on display on the first floor of Franklin Library, Fisk University throughout the month of February. This file was updated on February 21, ...

A presentation for Black History Month 2013 that will be on display on the first floor of Franklin Library, Fisk University throughout the month of February. This file was updated on February 21, 2013. As seen by the sources on the last page of the presentation, there are a selection of songs and speech excerpts that play along with this but could not be uploaded here. I apologize for the inconvenience.

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    At the Crossroads of Freedom and Equality At the Crossroads of Freedom and Equality Presentation Transcript

    • Celebrating Black History Month 2013More to explore: www.africanamericanhistorymonth.gov/
    • There was once a time here in the United States of America… when people were sold as property.
    • To be sold. . .a cargo of 170 prime young likely healthy Guinea slaves. Savannah, July 25, 1774. Copyprintof a broadside. Prints and Photographs Division. Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-16876 (1-2)
    • $200 Reward. Ranaway from the subscriber . . . Five Negro Slaves. Broadside. 1847. Rare Bookand Special Collections Division. (1-16)
    • July 4, 1776The Declaration of Independence was adopted…  but a section denouncing the slave trade was deleted.Bennett, Lerone, Jr. Before the Mayflower: A History of Black America (Chicago: Johnson Publishing, 1987), 446.
    • Not everyone agreed with slavery…  there were appeals,rebellions, mutinies…
    • The Confessions of Nat Turner, the Leader of the Late An Account of Some of the Principal Slave Insurrections . .Insurrection in Southampton, Virginia . . ., . . Compiled by Joshua Coffin.Richmond: Thomas R. Gray, 1832. Rare Book and New York: The American Anti-slavery Society, 1860.Special Collections Division. (1-8) Rare Book and Special Collections Division. (1-19)
    • There were also abolitionists and the Underground Railroad … The Slaves Friend, Volume II, p. 3 New York: American"Outrage," February 2, 1837 Handbill Rare Book Anti-Slavery Society, 1836 Rare Book and Specialand Special Collections Division (41) Collections Division (37)
    • Sojourner Truth. Carte de visite (seated), 1864. Sarah H. Bradford. Harriet, the Moses of Her People.Gladstone Collection, Prints and Photographs New York: J. J. Little & Co., 1901. Susan B. AnthonyDivision. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-6165 Collection, Rare Book and Special Collections Division.(3-11b) (3-21)
    • Finally… January 1, 1863  2 years into theAmerican Civil War…
    • LC-DIG-pga-02797, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division
    • Photograph copy of President Abraham Lincolns draft of the final Emancipation Proclamation, January 1, 1863. Originaldestroyed in the Chicago fire of 1871. The Robert Todd Lincoln Family Papers, Manuscript Division. Pages 1-2.http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/alhtml/almtime.html
    • Photograph copy of President Abraham Lincolns draft of the final Emancipation Proclamation, January 1, 1863. Originaldestroyed in the Chicago fire of 1871. The Robert Todd Lincoln Family Papers, Manuscript Division. Pages 3-4.http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/alhtml/almtime.html
    • Perspectives on The Emancipation Proclamation  “the first step on the part of the nation in its departure from the thraldom of the ages.“ Frederick Douglass “The trenchant observation by Douglass that the Emancipation Proclamation was but the first step could not have been more accurate. Although the Presidential decree would not free slaves in areas where the United States could not enforce the Proclamation, it sent a mighty signal both to the slaves and to the Confederacy that enslavement would no longer be tolerated.” John Hope FranklinExcerpts from: Franklin, John Hope, “The Emancipation Proclamation, An Act of Justice,” Prologue Magazine, 25.2,Summer 1993, http://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/1993/summer/emancipation-proclamation.html
    •  But the EmancipationProclamation did not free the slaves… that took 2 more years.
    • December 18, 1865  Thirteenth Amendment abolished slaveryBennett, Lerone, Jr. Before the Mayflower: A History of Black America (Chicago: Johnson Publishing, 1987), 475.
    • Thomas Nast. Emancipation. Philadelphia: S. Bott, 1865. Wood engraving. Prints andPhotographs Division. Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-2573 (5-9)
    • After 12 years of progressduring Reconstruction …racism was still rampant.
    • “Jim Crow” and Segregation vs. Anti-Lynching Campaigns and Sit-ins
    • “A terrible blot on American civilization. 3424 lynchings in 33 years ... Prepared by the Committee on public affairsThe Inter-fraternal council. Issued by District of Columbia anti-lynching committee North eastern federation ofColored womens,” Washington, 1922, Library of Congress Printed Ephemera Collection; Portfolio 208, Folder 36.
    • George W. McLaurin, 1948. Gelatin silver print. Visual Materials from the NAACP Records, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress (47) Digital ID# cph 3c16927 Courtesy of the NAACP“Outrage! [from newspaper],” Union 12, no.49 (12/14/1918): 01, Newspaper Roll #8847.
    • Woman fingerprinted. Mrs. Rosa Parks,Negro seamstress, whose refusal to move tothe back of a bus touched off the bus boycottin Montgomery, Ala. New York World-Telegram & Sun Collection. 1956. Prints &Photographs Division. ReproductionNumber: LC-USZ62-109643Rosa Parks rode at the front of a Illustration of bus where Rosa Parks sat, December 1, 1955. Civil CaseMontgomery, Alabama, bus on the day the 1147. Browder, et al v. Gayle, et. al; U.S. District Court for MiddleSupreme Courts ban on segregation of the District of Alabama, Northern (Montgomery) Divisioncitys buses took effect. A year earlier, she Record Group 21: Records of the District Court of the United Stateshad been arrested for refusing to give up her National Archives and Records Administration-Southeast Region,seat on a bus. East Point, GA. ARC Identifier 596069http://www.ushistory.org/us/54b.asp
    • Agitators attack a sit-in demonstrator in downtown Nashville, February 27, 1960. Photo by VicCooley, Nashville Banner.The Civil Rights Collection of the Nashville Public Library(http://www.library.nashville.org/civilrights/photos.htm)
    •  100 years after theEmancipation Proclamation… It is 1963 and just under 10 years into the Civil Rights Movement.
    • “Until justice is blind, until education is unaware of race, until opportunity is unconcerned with the color of mens skins, emancipation will be a proclamation but not a fact.” Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson “Surely, in 1963, 100 years after emancipation, it should not be necessary for any American citizen to demonstrate in the streets for an opportunity to stop at a hotel, or eat at a lunch counter . . . on the same terms as any other customer.” President John F. KennedyExcerpts from: Franklin, John Hope, “The Emancipation Proclamation, An Act of Justice,” Prologue Magazine,25.2, Summer 1993, http://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/1993/summer/emancipation-proclamation.html
    • But it was necessary…
    • Demonstration on Church Street at a site of present Nashville Public Library. Photo by J.T.Phillips, The Tennessean.The Civil Rights Collection of the Nashville Public Library(http://www.library.nashville.org/civilrights/photos.htm)
    • Civil rights leaders Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., (front row, second from left), A. Philip Randolph (frontrow, far right), and Roy Wilkins (front row, second from right) lead the March on Washington for Jobs andFreedom on August 28, 1963.National Archives, Records of the U.S. Information Agency (http://www.digitalvaults.org/record/289.html)
    • March on Washington , August 28, 1963.Miscellaneous Subjects, Staff and Stringer Photographs, National Archives, Records of the U.S. Information Agency,Record Group 306 (ARC ID 542045), http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/documented-rights/exhibit/section4/
    • “I Have A Dream” Speech, March on Washington, August 28, 1963.U.S. News and World Report Photograph Collection, Prints and Photographs Division. Reproduction Number: LC-U9-10360-23 (9-13), http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/odyssey/archive/09/0913001r.jpg
    • August 28, 1963, “I Have A Dream”  “Five score years ago, a great American, … signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree … came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity. … But one hundred years later, the Negro still is not free.”Copyright 1963, Martin Luther King, Jr. Excerpts from National Archives and Records Administration:http://www.archives.gov/press/exhibits/dream-speech.pdf
    • August 28, 1963, “I Have A Dream”  “I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: „We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal.‟ I have a dream that one day, … little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers. … let freedom ring!”Copyright 1963, Martin Luther King, Jr. Excerpts from National Archives and Records Administration:http://www.archives.gov/press/exhibits/dream-speech.pdf
    • August 28, 1963, “I Have A Dream”  READ the full text at the National Archives and Records Administration: http://www.archives.gov/press/exhibits/dream- speech.pdf LISTEN to the speech at the Internet Archive: http://archive.org/details/MLKDream WATCH the speech at Huffington Post: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/01/16/i-have-a- dream-speech-text-martin-luther-king-jr_n_1207734.html  Purchase the video at TheKingCenter.org or Amazon.com.
    • Perspectives on Modern Freedom  “The law itself is no longer an obstruction to justice and equality, but it is the people who live under the law who are themselves an obvious obstruction to justice. One can only hope that sooner rather than later we can all find the courage to live under the spirit of the Emancipation Proclamation and under the laws that flowed from its inspiration.” John Hope FranklinExcerpts from: Franklin, John Hope, “The Emancipation Proclamation, An Act of Justice,” PrologueMagazine, 25.2, Summer 1993,http://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/1993/summer/emancipation-proclamation.html
    • And now in 2013, 150 years after the EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION…  50 years after the MARCH ON WASHINGTON…
    • Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts administers the oath of office to President Barack Obama during the official swearing-in ceremony in the Blue Room of the White House on Inauguration Day, Sunday, Jan. 20, 2013. First Lady Michelle Obama, holding the Robinson family Bible, and daughters Malia and Sasha stand with the President. (Official White House Photo by Lawrence Jackson) http://www.whitehouse.gov/photos-and-video/photogallery/inauguration-president-barack-obama-and-vice-president-joe-biden
    • January 21, 2013  The SECONDPresidential Inauguration of Barack H. Obama
    • President Barack Obama   The first African American U.S. President  Elected for a second term, the maximum term length for any modern President Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts administers the oath of office to President Barack Obama during the inaugural swearing-in ceremony at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., Jan. 21, 2013. First Lady Michelle Obama holds a Bible that belonged to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and the Lincoln Bible, which was used at President Obama‟s 2009 inaugural ceremony. Daughters Malia and Sasha stand with their parents. (Official White House Photo by Sonya N. Hebert) http://www.whitehouse.gov/photos-and- video/photogallery/inauguration- president-barack-obama-and-vice- president-joe-biden
    • President Barack Obama‟s Inaugural Address  “We, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths –- that all of us are created equal –- is the star that guides us still; just as it guided our forebears through Seneca Falls, and Selma, and Stonewall; just as it guided all those men and women, sung and unsung, who left footprints along this great Mall, to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk alone; to hear a King proclaim that our individual freedom is inextricably bound to the freedom of every soul on Earth.”Excerpts from the 2013 Inaugural Address: http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2013/01/21/inaugural-address-president-barack-obama
    • President Barack Obama‟s Inaugural Address  “It is now our generation‟s task to carry on what those pioneers began …to make these words, these rights, these values of life and liberty and the pursuit of happiness real for every American.”Excerpts from the 2013 Inaugural Address: http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2013/01/21/inaugural-address-president-barack-obama
    • President Barack Obama‟s Inaugural Address  WATCH or READ the entire address at the White House website: http://www.whitehouse.gov /blog/inaugural-address/
    • Are you interested in reading more or browsing images? Follow the links or search the terms.  African American Digital Collections:
    • National Archives andRecords Administration (NARA)  Emancipation Proclamation: www.archives/gov/exhibits/featur ed_documents/emancipation_procla mation Documented Rights: http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/ documented-rights/ (image from website)
    • Library of Congress American Memory Project  From Slavery to Freedom, The African-American Pamphlet Collection: http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/aapchtml/aapchome.ht ml African American Odyssey: http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/aaohtml/exhibit/aointro .html (image from website)
    • Civil Rights Digital Library: http://crdl.usg.edu/  A virtual library including but not limited to videos, images, and documents, on the Civil Rights Movement that connects related digital collections on a national scale. (image from website)
    • Martin Luther King, Jr. Digital Archive:www.thekingcenter.org/archive  “The King Center Imaging Project brings the works and papers of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. to a digital generation.” Guenther Jacobs from Germany sends Dr. King a photo for him to autograph. (image from website)
    • Meanwhile, in Tennessee  Andrew Johnson and Emancipation: http://www.nps.gov/anjo/historyculture/johnson -and-tn-emancipation.htm Civil Rights Museum, Memphis, TN (some images available online): http://www.civilrightsmuseum.org/
    • Nashville Public Library The Civil Rights Movement in Nashville:http://www.library.nashville.org/civilrights/home.html (image from website)
    • Tennessee State Library and Archives  Newly expanded online exhibit:http://tn.gov/tsla/exhibits/blackhistory/index.htm (image from website)
    • Celebrate! Black History Month 2013 Nashville, Tennessee
    • Celebrate Black History Month 2013: Nashville Public Library exhibit  The Civil Rights Collection is displayed on the 2nd floor of the Main branch.
    • Celebrate Black History Month 2013: Tennessee State Museum exhibits   The Civil War and Reconstruction  Permanent exhibit  Discovering the Civil War  Opens February 12 (Free admission)
    • Celebrate Black History Month 2013: Tennessee State Museum exhibits   Emancipation Proclamation viewing  February 12-15, 9:00am – 7:00pm  February 16-18, 10:00am – 8:00pm  Admission is free, but reservations are suggested  Call 615-782-4040 or go to www.tpac.org  13th Amendment on display until August 2013
    • Celebrate Black History Month 2013: Tuesday, February 5   4:30pm Evolution of Hip Hop Dance @ Southeast branch library
    • Celebrate Black History Month 2013: Wednesday, February 6   10:00am Hip Hop with Onya Williams @ North branch library  3:30pm Hip Hop with Onya Williams @ Watkins Park branch library
    • Celebrate Black History Month 2013: Thursday, February 7   4:00pm Trivia Contest @ Hadley Park branch library  6:00pm A Celebration of Music & Culture @ The Hermitage  6:00pm The March on Washington: Revisited @ Bellevue branch library  7:00pm Researching your African American Roots @ Richland Park branch library
    • Celebrate Black History Month 2013: Friday, February 8   8:00am – 4:30pm Nashville Conference on African American History and Culture @ TSU Avon-Williams campus  7:30pm Fisk Jubilee Singers Benefit Concert @ Studio Gallery at Fontanel Mansion
    • Celebrate Black History Month 2013: Saturday, February 9   11:00am Hymnology in The Black Church @ North branch library
    • Celebrate Black History Month 2013: Tuesday, February 12   10:00am “American Experience: Freedom Riders” PBS documentary @ Hadley Park branch library  3:30pm “A Raisin in the Sun” @ East branch library
    • Celebrate Black History Month 2013: Wednesday, February 13   7:00pm TSU Wind Ensemble Black History Concert @ TSU Performing Arts Center Cox/Lewis Theatre and Music Hall
    • Celebrate Black History Month 2013: Thursday, February 14   4:00pm Trivia Contest @ Hadley Park branch library  4:00pm Malcolm X: Life, Faith and Mission @ Watkins Park branch library
    • Celebrate Black History Month 2013: Saturday, February 16   1:00pm “Emancipation and the Meaning of Freedom” panel discussion @ The Hermitage  2:00pm “The Color Purple” @ Green Hills branch library  2:00pm “Our Friend Martin” @ Hadley Park branch library  2:00pm Celebrating African American Achievements @ Hermitage branch library
    • Celebrate Black History Month 2013: Thursday, February 21   10:00am African American Ancestry Search @ Madison branch library  4:00pm Trivia Contest @ Hadley Park branch library
    • Celebrate Black History Month 2013: Saturday, February 23   10:00am African American Genealogy Workshop @ Looby branch library  1:00pm Honoring The Hermitage‟s Enslaved Community @ The Hermitage
    • Celebrate Black History Month 2013: Wednesday, February 27   10:00am “Let Freedom Sing: How Music Inspired the Civil Rights Movement” @ Hadley Park branch library  4:00pm Racism in America: Reality or Illusion? @ Watkins Park branch library  4:00pm How To: Ancestry Library Edition, Finding Your African American Ancestors @ Bordeaux branch library
    • Celebrate Black History Month 2013: Thursday, February 28   4:00pm Trivia Contest @ Hadley Park branch library
    • Check out these websites for other events around town  Celebrate Black History Month at Vanderbilt: http://sitemason.vanderbilt.edu/myvu/news/2 010/02/02/celebrate-black-history-month-at- vanderbilt.105999 Visit Music City: http://www.visitmusiccity.com/visitors/events /blackhistorymonth More links at News 2: http://www.wkrn.com/global/Category.asp?c= 160607
    • Music and Speeches:  "Come by Here," performed by Ethel Best, 1936: http://lcweb2.loc.gov/diglib/ihas/loc.natlib.ihas.200197362/default.html "Jesus is My Only Friend," performed by Bessie Shaw, 1926: http://lcweb2.loc.gov/diglib/ihas/loc.natlib.ihas.200196564/default.html Martin Luther King, Jr.‟s “I Have a Dream” speech: http://archive.org/details/MLKDream President Obama‟s Second Inaugural Address: http://www.npr.org/2013/01/21/169903155/transcript-barack-obamas- second-inaugural-address "Rock in My Soul," performed by Rich Brown, 1940: http://lcweb2.loc.gov/diglib/ihas/loc.natlib.ihas.200197579/default.html "Strange Fruit,“ performed by Billie Holiday: http://archive.org/details/BillieHoliday-StrangeFruit "We Shall Overcome,“ performed by Mahalia Jackson: http://www.cbcpp.com/202mp3/weshallovercome.mp3 Presentation by: Amanda J. Carter