0 measurement rubric

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0 measurement rubric

  1. 1. Mrs. Henley’s OVERVIEW of MEASUREMENT APPLICATION RUBRIC 4 Meets all criteria of numbers 1,2,3. Students demonstrate mastery of scientific tools, how to use them, & units. Students should record the most accurate answers that can be inferred. Students design individual labs and determine which tools would be best to use in their experiments. Students should be able to relate density to everyday items. Mastery of problem solving: Which measurement is best of given scenarios o Distance of a city: m, dm, km o Length of a room: cm, m, dam o Volume of coke can , ml, cl, l 3 Meets all criteria of numbers 1 & 2. Students are introduced to density and its formula Students begin problem solving: Which measurement is best in a given scenario o Length of a table… mm, cm, or a meter? o Cup of coffee…ml, L, kl? When the measurement falls between two increments in the tenths spot, students may round to the nearest hundredths place. 2 Meets all criteria for number 1. Students can verbalize and discus how each scientific tool is used and what they are used for. Students always label units on their work. When measuring, students are able to round to the nearest tenths spot when the measurement falls between two whole numbers. Students are comfortable and do not need explanations during labs on how to use scientific tools or how to measure. 1 Students should be able to match the correct scientific tool to the type of measurement it is used for. Students should be able to match the correct type of measurement or tool to the correct units. When measuring, students should be able to round to the nearest whole number. Students can use and read measurement tools during lab investigations. Students understand mass and volume Students begin associating measurements with actual size. (Ex. Liter-2 liter bottle, Meter-ground to door knob) 0 Students have no working knowledge of measurement, academic vocabulary, measurement units or scientific tools. R EME DIA TE PRO FICI ENT EXT ENTI ON
  2. 2. Mrs. Henley’s USE OF METRIC RULER& LENGTH RUBRIC 4 Meets all criteria of numbers 1,2,3. Students estimate to the closest place, including the hundredths position. Units are never left blank. Students understand why some answers are cm, cm2 , or cm3 Students use rulers to communicate results of an experiment. 3 Meets all criteria of numbers 1 & 2. Without instruction, students know when to use rulers to collect data into tables and charts. Students use rulers to determine the area, volume and surface area of an object. 2 Meets all criteria for number 1 When using a ruler, students are able to estimate to the nearest tenths spot. Students naturally label units when writing their answers. 1 Students understand when rulers should be used to measure. Students identify that they should start at the 0 mark and not necessarily the edge of the ruler. Students can find cms on a ruler vs. mms and understand there are 10 mm in every centimenter. When using a ruler, students estimate measurements to the nearest whole number or half mark. Units (cm/mm) should always be used. Students are able to use rulers to measure lengths and distances. 0 Students have no working knowledge of metric rulers or how they are used. R EME DIAT E PROF ICIEN T EXTE NTIO N
  3. 3. Mrs. Henley’s GRADUATED CYLINDER& VOLUME RUBRIC 4 Meets all criteria of numbers 1,2,3. When measuring, students can infer measurements to the nearest hundredths spot. Students are able to describe meniscus and its importance Students have mastery over assignments that mix graduated cylinders with different intervals. Students know how to use volume measurements to solve for density equations. 3 Meets all criteria of numbers 1 & 2. Students know how to find the volume of an object. o Students understand the concept of displacement to find the area of an irregular object. o Students know to use LxWxH to find the volume of a regular shaped object. o Students know to use a graduated cylinder to find the volume of a liquid. Students understand the concept of ml / cm3 / cc and when to label the units as such. 2 Meets all criteria for number 1. Measurements are estimated to the nearest tenths spot. Students are able to use the word “meniscus” in their academic vocabularies. Students can read graduated cylinders that are marked in differing increments 1 Students recognize that a graduated cylinder is a tool to measure the volume of liquids. Students can measure eye level from the bottom of the meniscus. Students pay attention to the intervals on the graduated cylinder. Students estimate answers to the nearest whole number or half mark. Units are recorded. 0 Students have no working knowledge of graduated cylinders, their use, or how to use them.. REM EDI ATE PRO FICI ENT EXT ENTI ON
  4. 4. Mrs. Henley’s THERMOMETER AND TEMPERATURE RUBRIC 4 Meets all criteria of numbers 1,2,3. Students understand that Degrees Celsius come from the Kelvinscale. Students have mastery of mixed questions which may vary in increments and include negative readings. 3 Meets all criteria of numbers 1 & 2. Students are able to read thermometers at different increments Students are able to measure thermometers to the nearest tenths position. 2 Meets all criteria for number 1. Students understand that boiling points and freezing points of F and C are different. Students begin work with negative degrees. 1 Students chose a thermometer when asked to measure temperature. Answers are in degrees Celsius Student are able to read thermometers and round to the nearest whole number or half mark. Students read thermometers eye level. 0 Students have no working knowledge of thermometers, their use, or how to measure with them. REM EDI ATE PRO FICI ENT EXT ENTI ON
  5. 5. Mrs. Henley’s TRIPLE BEAM BALANCE & MASS RUBRIC 4 Meets all criteria of numbers 1,2,3. Students are able to infer to the hundredths spot if the riders fall between two tenths. Students can use mass calculations to determine the density of an object. 3 Meets all criteria of numbers 1 & 2. Students are able to determine mass when they are not lead to use a triple beam balance. Using the riders, students measure to the nearest tenths spot if necessary. 2 Meets all criteria for number 1. Students correctly line up the decimals when adding up the 3 riders to determine mass. Pointer should line up exactly on the zero mark when “balanced”. 1 Students chose a triple beam balance when asked to measure mass. Students know how to properly use the riders on a triple beam balance to determine the mass of an object. Pointer is very close to the zero mark when “balanced” 0 Students have no working knowledge of triple beam balances, their use, or how to measure with them. REM EDI ATE PRO FICI ENT EXT ENTI ON

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