TERMINOLOGY USED TO
DESCRIBE THE PARTS OF A
TOOTH
FOUR TISSUES OF A TOOTH
 Enamel
 Dentin
 Cementum
 Pulp
especially next to the cervical line, similar in thickness
to a page in this text (only 50–100 µm thick where one
µm is on...
Enamel
 It is the white, protective external surface layer of the anatomic crown.

 highly calcified or mineralized,

 ...
Cementum
 It is the dull yellow external layer of the tooth root.

 The cementum is very thin, especially next to the ce...
Cementoenamel Junction (CEJ)
 It separates the enamel of the crown from the
cementum of the anatomic root.

 Also known ...
Dentin
It is the hard yellowish tissue underlying the enamel and
cementum

 Makes up the major bulk of the inner portion...
Dentinoenamel Junction (DEJ)
Cementoenamel Junction (CEJ)
 DEJ = is the inner surface of the enamel cap where
enamel join...
Pulp
 is the soft (not calcified or mineralized) tissue in the
cavity or space in the center of the crown and root called...
Pulp
 It develops from the dental papilla (mesoderm).

 Pulp is soft connective tissue containing a rich supply of
blood...
ANATOMIC VERSUS CLINICAL CROWN
AND ROOT
 The anatomic crown is that part of the tooth (in the
mouth or handheld) normally...
especially next to the cervical line, similar in thickness
to a page in this text (only 50–100 µm thick where one
µm is on...
 The clinical crown refers specifically to the amount of
tooth visible in the oral cavity,

 The clinical root refers to...
End.
Terminlogy used to describe the parts of the tooth
Terminlogy used to describe the parts of the tooth
Terminlogy used to describe the parts of the tooth
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Terminlogy used to describe the parts of the tooth

216

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
216
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Enamel, dentin , cementum are hard and has mineral content especially calcium, hence they are called calcified tissues.
    Two of these tissues are only visible which is the enemel and dentin. While the other two are not visible on an intact tooth.
  • They are as hard as bone but softer than enamel
  • It extends from the pulp cavity in the center of the tooth outward to the inner surface of the enamel (on the crown) or cementum (on the root)
    Dentin is not normally visible except on a dental radiograph, or when the enamel or cementum have been worn away, or cut away when preparing a tooth with a bur, or destroyed by decay.
  • Nerves and blood vessels enter the pulp through apical foramina.
    Like dentin, the pulp is normally not visible, except on a dental radiograph (x-ray) or sectioned tooth.
    The pulp cavity is surrounded by dentin, except at a hole (or holes) near the root tip (apex) called an apical foramen.
  • Formative: Dentin-producing cells (odontoblasts) produce dentin throughout the life of a tooth. This is called secondary dentin.
    Sensory: Nerve endings relay the sense of pain caused from heat, cold, drilling, sweet foods, decay, trauma, or infection to the brain, so we feel it. However, the nerve fibers in a dental pulp are unable to distin- guish the cause of the pain.
    Nutritive: Blood vessels transport nutrients from the bloodstream to cells of the pulp and the odon- toblasts that produce dentin. (Surprisingly, blood in the tooth pulp had passed through the heart only 6 seconds previously.)
    Defensive or protective: Pulp responds to injury or decay by forming reparative dentin (by the odontoblasts).
  • A cervical line (or cemen- toenamel junction) separates the anatomic crown from the anatomic root. This relationship does not change over a patient’s lifetime.
  • Terminlogy used to describe the parts of the tooth

    1. 1. TERMINOLOGY USED TO DESCRIBE THE PARTS OF A TOOTH
    2. 2. FOUR TISSUES OF A TOOTH  Enamel  Dentin  Cementum  Pulp
    3. 3. especially next to the cervical line, similar in thickness to a page in this text (only 50–100 µm thick where one µm is one millionth of a meter). It is composed of 65% calcium hydroxyapatite (mineralized and calcified), 35% organic matter (collagen fibers), and 12% water. (Another author, Melfi, states that the mineral content ter (collagen fibers), and 12% water, mak than cementum but softer and less brittle Dentin develops from the embryonic d (mesoderm). The cells that form dentin, toblasts [ o DON toe blasts] , are located at between pulp and dentin. Apical foramen Anatomic Root Root canal Cementum Dentin Cementodentinal junction Pulp chamber Anatomic Crown Cementoenamel junction Enamel Dentinoenamel junction Lingual surface of crown FIGURE 1-6. A maxil tooth sectioned longitudi the middle to show the d the tooth tissues and the pulp cavity (made up of p and root canal). On the r close-up of the apical por the usual expected constr root canal near the apica layer of cementum coveri an actual tooth is propor thinner than seen in these
    4. 4. Enamel  It is the white, protective external surface layer of the anatomic crown.  highly calcified or mineralized,  hardest substance in the body.  Its mineral content is 95% calcium hydroxy- apatite (which is calcified).  The remaining substances include 5% water and enamel matrix.  It develops from the enamel organ (ectoderm) and is a product of specialized epithelial cells called ameloblasts
    5. 5. Cementum  It is the dull yellow external layer of the tooth root.  The cementum is very thin, especially next to the cervical line (only 50– 100 μm thick)  It is composed of 65% calcium hydroxyapatite (mineralized and calcified),  35% organic matter (collagen fibers), and 12% water.  It develops from the dental sac (mesoderm), and is produced by cells called cementoblasts
    6. 6. Cementoenamel Junction (CEJ)  It separates the enamel of the crown from the cementum of the anatomic root.  Also known as the cervical line, denoting that it surrounds the neck or cervix of the tooth.
    7. 7. Dentin It is the hard yellowish tissue underlying the enamel and cementum  Makes up the major bulk of the inner portion of each tooth crown and root. Mature dentin is composed of about 70% calcium hydroxyapatite, 18% organic matter (collagen fibers), and 12% water, Making it harder than cementum but softer and less brittle than enamel.
    8. 8. Dentinoenamel Junction (DEJ) Cementoenamel Junction (CEJ)  DEJ = is the inner surface of the enamel cap where enamel joins dentin.  This junction can be best seen on a radio- graph.  CEJ = is the inner surface of cementum where cementum joins dentin.  Cementum is so thin that it is difficult to identify this junction on a radiograph.
    9. 9. Pulp  is the soft (not calcified or mineralized) tissue in the cavity or space in the center of the crown and root called the pulp cavity.  The pulp cavity has a coronal portion (pulp chamber) and a root portion (pulp canal or root canal).
    10. 10. Pulp  It develops from the dental papilla (mesoderm).  Pulp is soft connective tissue containing a rich supply of blood vessels and nerves.  Functions of the dental pulp are as follows:  Formative  Sensory  Nutritive  Defensive
    11. 11. ANATOMIC VERSUS CLINICAL CROWN AND ROOT  The anatomic crown is that part of the tooth (in the mouth or handheld) normally covered by an enamel layer  Anatomic root is the part of a tooth covered by cementum.
    12. 12. especially next to the cervical line, similar in thickness to a page in this text (only 50–100 µm thick where one µm is one millionth of a meter). It is composed of 65% calcium hydroxyapatite (mineralized and calcified), 35% organic matter (collagen fibers), and 12% water. (Another author, Melfi, states that the mineral content ter (collagen fibers), and 12% water, m than cementum but softer and less britt Dentin develops from the embryonic (mesoderm). The cells that form denti toblasts [ o DON toe blasts] , are located between pulp and dentin. Apical foramen Anatomic Root Root canal Cementum Dentin Cementodentinal junction Pulp chamber Anatomic Crown Cementoenamel junction Enamel Dentinoenamel junction Lingual surface of crown FIGURE 1-6. A ma tooth sectioned longitu the middle to show the the tooth tissues and pulp cavity (made up o and root canal). On th close-up of the apical p the usual expected con root canal near the api layer of cementum cov an actual tooth is prop thinner than seen in th
    13. 13.  The clinical crown refers specifically to the amount of tooth visible in the oral cavity,  The clinical root refers to the amount of tooth that is not visible since it is covered with gingiva (gum tissue).
    14. 14. End.
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×