La empresa digital y los nuevos retos del marketing by IBM

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La empresa
digital y los
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La empresa digital y los nuevos retos del marketing by IBM

  1. 1. La empresaLa empresa digital y losdigital y los nuevos retosnuevos retos del marketingdel marketing
  2. 2. 2 Introducción
  3. 3. 3 Our research has evolved from understanding the presence of technology in shopping to its importance in choosing a retailer 2010 Meeting the Demands of the Smarter Consumer ‘Use of technology’ 2011 Capitalizing on the Smarter Consumer ‘Personalization’ 2012 Winning Over the Empowered Consumer ‘Trust’ 2013 From Transactions to Relationships ‘Transactions by channel’ 2014 Greater Expectations ‘Expectations’
  4. 4. 4 We surveyed 30,554 consumers in 16 countries to discover their opinions of omnichannel capabilities and the impact on choice Japan (1829) Australia (1822) China (1799) Italy (1838) UK (1804) US (3143) Brazil (1828) France (1823) Canada (1881) Mexico (1822) Spain (1841) Denmark (1815) Poland (1840) Germany (1819) India (1811) South Korea (1839) Primary Research in 16 Countries —Total Surveyed = 30,554 Source: IBM IBV 2013 survey, n= 30,554
  5. 5. 5 Results were analyzed across income, generations and product categories Product categoriesAges surveyedIncome brackets Upper n= 7627 Upper Middle n= 7553 Lower Middle n= 7167 Lower n= 8205 Generation (18-24) n= 2656 Generation (25-29) n= 3186 Generation (30-39) n= 7496 Generation (40-49) n= 6426 Generation (50-59) n= 5517 Generation (60+) n= 5273 Adult Apparel n= 3959 Kids Apparel n= 3769 Luxury Brands n= 3328 Health & Beauty n= 3947 Consumer Electronics n= 3793 Grocery n= 4356 Shoes n= 3701 Home Merchandise n= 3701 Source: IBM IBV 2013 survey, n= 30,554.
  6. 6. 6 Key Findings
  7. 7. 7 While the store still rules, it is losing share rapidly 2012 2013 In-Store Online Other Source: IBM IBV 2013 survey, n= 30,554 Q26 Last purch channel Year on year comparisons include 13 of 16 surveyed countries 84% 14% 2% 72% 27% 1% Percent of last purchases reported by channel
  8. 8. 8 Growth in online sales is a result of shoppers going directly to the web and not exclusively from showrooming Pre-purchase activities for 2013 Visited a store Compared prices online Looked online for new items 8% 13% 14% Source: IBM IBV 2013 survey, n= 30,554. Q27 Online prepurch activities Year on year comparisons include 13 of 16 surveyed countries Percent of shoppers who showroomed for their last purchase 6% 8% 2012 2013 Showrooming defined as having visited a store before ultimately making the purchase online
  9. 9. 9 Social networking saw a frequency increase with more posting about purchased items of consumers in 2013 indicated they posted about a retailer they had shopped43% Source: IBM IBV 2013 survey, n= 30,554. Q50, Q51, Q52 Year on year comparisons include 13 of 16 surveyed countries Social activities year on year
  10. 10. 10 Friends’ social posts are more influential in determining purchasing choices than direct retailer communications Source: IBM IBV 2013 survey, n= 30,554. Q40 decision influencers Influencers of purchase behavior Chart shows percent of shoppers finding the communication “somewhat” or “very influential'
  11. 11. 11 Friends’ social posts are more influential in determining purchasing choices than direct retailer communications En cada aparición pública de Michelle Obama, las redes sociales compiten para identificar las marcas fabricantes de sus vestidos, zapatos y accesorios y proliferan los links a las tiendas on line de dichos fabricantes. Según un estudio publicado por la HBR, este efecto “social” redunda en que estos fabricantes tienen un revalorización “instantánea” del 2% de sus acciones, lo que supone un impacto económico de 14$ millones por cada una de sus 189 apariciones públicas. (Catherine Rampbell, “Does Michelle Obama wardrobe move markets?” The New York Times, citando estudio de David Yermack)
  12. 12. 12 Sharing “ways to reach me” is still in the minority for most shoppers but sharing current location is gaining interest 19% 36% 2011 2013 Mobile # = 38% 2013 — Willingness to share Social handle = 32% Willing to share current location (GPS) Source: IBM IBV 2013 survey, n= 30,554. Q31 and Q54 Year on year comparisons include 13 of 16 surveyed countries
  13. 13. 13 Half of consumers are neutral about SoLoMo* initiatives and are still waiting for a reason to engage with retailers Retailers using current location (GPS) negative neutral positive 28 49 23 23 51 26 22 50 28 20 50 30 17 52 31 Associates able to pull up my browsing history Retailers texting me Retailers analyzing my posts to recommend new items Retailers contacting me via social networks Source: IBM IBV 2013 survey, n= 30,554. Q31 InfoShare *SoLoMo = Social Location Mobile Interest in SoLoMo
  14. 14. 14 Five top omnichannel requirements emerged from consumer rankings 1. Price consistency across channels 2. In-store, locate out-of-stock item and get it shipped home 3. Track order status 4. Consistent assortment across channels 5. Return in store of online purchases Top 5 omnichannel capabilities Source: IBM IBV 2013 survey, n= 30,554 Q21 HYP2 New capabilities
  15. 15. 15 Going deeper, the data outlined four classes of consumers differentiated by their omnichannel maturity Importance of key Omnichannel capabilities Omnichannel Maturity 19%19% 40%40% 29%29% 12%12% Traditional Transitioning Tech-intrigued Trailblazers Source: IBM IBV 2013 survey, n= 30,554. Comfortwithshoppinginmultiplechannel
  16. 16. 16 Consumer adoption of SoLoMo behaviors also distinguished the four classifications SoLoMo– limited SoLoMo– used SoLoMo– expected 19%19% Traditional Uses least amount of technology while shopping Transitioning Uses technology mostly for research and information Tech-intrigued Uses SoLoMo from browsing through buying Trailblazers Uses SoLoMo extensively; including as a Retailer evaluation tool 40%40% 29%29% 12%12% Source: IBM IBV 2013 survey, n= 30,554.
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  19. 19. 19 RESULTS SUMMARY • Stores require quick attention – The store still rules for most purchases – Stores are being skipped over more than ever – Online growth accelerates; Showrooming is not the culprit • SoLoMo is growing and consumers are waiting – Many consumers are willing to share contact information – E-tailers and other industries are driving consumer expectations – Consumers still wondering about Retail SoLoMo application • Consumers have specific omnichannel requests – Much agreement on 5 basic asks exists – Consumers want to self-serve & therefore need visibility and consistency – Trends indicate omnichannel requirements are only going to increase
  20. 20. 20 Consumer expectations are changing rapidly and they are defining the must-haves today • Use SoLoMo to energize the store – Consumer SoLoMo openness is there but retail benefits must be clear – Other industries can inspire new applications • Execute the new omnichannel requirements – Consistent delivery of the top five asks is needed – Coordination of fulfillment and returns between channels is essential – Negative surprises in pricing & assortment must be mitigated or eliminated • Audit yourself against the Trailblazers asks and act quickly – Self-serve capabilities such as multiple fulfillment options are desired – On-demand personalized communication can empower shoppers – Consistency needs to extend to promotion & loyalty program execution
  21. 21. 21 Muchas gracias por su atención

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