• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Women and heart disease
 

Women and heart disease

on

  • 306 views

Too often, heart disease is considered a man’s disease. Actually, heart disease kills more women than men. ...

Too often, heart disease is considered a man’s disease. Actually, heart disease kills more women than men.

This misperception often leads women with heart issues to not get a timely diagnosis or the adequate care they need. Women often don’t know they have a heart problem until they have a heart attack.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
306
Views on SlideShare
306
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Women and heart disease Women and heart disease Document Transcript

    • Women and Heart DiseaseToo often, heart disease is considered a man’s disease. Actually, heart disease kills morewomen than men.This misperception often leads women with heart issues to not get a timely diagnosis orthe adequate care they need. Women often don’t know they have a heart problem untilthey have a heart attack.The truth is that heart disease is the number one killer of both men and women. Over one-third of all women will die of heart disease. About 460,000 will die of heart disease andstroke this year. Heart disease is also the leading cause of disability among women.Men, in general, do a better job when it comes to diagnosis and treatment. Womenreceive less treatment for heart disease than men do because they frequently dismiss theirsymptoms and put off routine exams. These delays in care can have devastatingconsequences, including disability or even death. Women tend to be diagnosed later inthe course of their disease and, once they are diagnosed, they tend to do more poorly thanmen in their outcome.Women should talk to their primary care doctor about what they can do to prevent heartdisease. Ask about signs and symptoms. Women need to know that not all heart attackscause chest pain, and symptoms in women can be different from men.Symptoms include pain that radiates to the jaw, shoulder, neck, upper back or arm.Nausea, vomiting, and intense sweating, shortness of breath, lightheadedness, dizzinessand unusual fatigue are also symptoms of a heart attack. If you have these symptoms orany chest discomfort, immediately call 911.Some risk factors in heart disease in women can be controlled Controllable factorsinclude high cholesterol levels and blood pressure, mental stress, low estrogen levels,smoking, diet, exercise and maintaining a healthy weight. Uncontrollable factors includefamily history, race, age and gender.Heart disease doesn’t affect only older women. Women under the age of 65 with a familyhistory of heart disease should be diligent when it comes to recognizing risk factors.Women of all ages should discuss their personal risk for heart disease with their primarycare doctor. Risk of heart disease can be greatly decreased when women have theinformation they need.
    • Women with heart disease who can no longer work due to physical and mental healthimpairments may be eligible for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits.To receive SSDI, applicants must prove that the disability prevents them from performingany type of work, including sedentary tasks. Always report ongoing symptoms and healthconcerns to healthcare professionals. Making them aware of symptoms such as shortnessof breath, chest pain and swelling is another important element of qualifying for SocialSecurity disability benefits.