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The Water-Energy Nexus: A Global Problem, with Local Solutions
The Water-Energy Nexus: A Global Problem, with Local Solutions
The Water-Energy Nexus: A Global Problem, with Local Solutions
The Water-Energy Nexus: A Global Problem, with Local Solutions
The Water-Energy Nexus: A Global Problem, with Local Solutions
The Water-Energy Nexus: A Global Problem, with Local Solutions
The Water-Energy Nexus: A Global Problem, with Local Solutions
The Water-Energy Nexus: A Global Problem, with Local Solutions
The Water-Energy Nexus: A Global Problem, with Local Solutions
The Water-Energy Nexus: A Global Problem, with Local Solutions
The Water-Energy Nexus: A Global Problem, with Local Solutions
The Water-Energy Nexus: A Global Problem, with Local Solutions
The Water-Energy Nexus: A Global Problem, with Local Solutions
The Water-Energy Nexus: A Global Problem, with Local Solutions
The Water-Energy Nexus: A Global Problem, with Local Solutions
The Water-Energy Nexus: A Global Problem, with Local Solutions
The Water-Energy Nexus: A Global Problem, with Local Solutions
The Water-Energy Nexus: A Global Problem, with Local Solutions
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The Water-Energy Nexus: A Global Problem, with Local Solutions

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Presentation: The Water-Energy Nexus: A Global Problem, with Local Solutions …

Presentation: The Water-Energy Nexus: A Global Problem, with Local Solutions
April 22, 2010
Austin, Texas
Meeting: Leveraging Efficiency through Philanthropic Investment in the Water-Energy Connection

Published in: Technology, Business
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  • Length: 10-15 minutes max Request from event organizers: minimize text on slides as much as possible; use graphs, maps, charts where necessary
  • (Photos are of pumps in the Tijuana wastewater treatment system, and the Alliance’s Carlos Morales)
  • Watergy: 40 cities around the world, active in Brazil, india, Mexico, Philippines, South Africa, Sri Lanka Municipal Network for Energy Efficiency (MUNEE) provides city officials in Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union with the necessary tools to implement cost-saving energy-efficiency improvements in heating and water systems, municipal buildings (particularly schools and hospitals) and homes.
  • Water is becoming scarcer, making it more energy-intensive and expensive to procure. Scientists, researchers, and others warn that the U.S. is entering a new era of water scarcity. A General Accounting Office (GAO) report from 2003 projected that 36 states could face water shortages by 2013. The states’ water authorities responded to a survey asking them to categorize their potential water problems, and their responses are highlighted here. At least three states that face water challenges — California, New Mexico, and Michigan — did not respond to the survey. BUT ENERGY/WATER EFFICIENCY CAN HELP ALLEVIATE WATER SHORTAGE PROBLEMS AND RELATED ENERGY/MONETARY COSTS: From EPA: An estimated 3% of national energy consumption, equivalent to approximately 56 billion kilowatt hours (kWh), is used for drinking water and wastewater services. Assuming the average mix of energy sources in the country, this equates to adding approximately 45 million tons of greenhouse gas to the atmosphere. The ENERGY STAR program estimates that about $4 billion is spent annually for energy costs to run drinking water and wastewater utilities. If the sector could reduce energy use by just 10% through cost-effective investments in energy efficiency, collectively it would save about $400 million annually. If one out of every 100 American homes retrofitted with water-efficient fixtures, we could save about 100 million kWh of electricity per year and avoid adding 80,000 tons of greenhouse gas to the atmosphere. EPA’s WaterSense program is helping to identify water efficient products that will help reduce energy needs to treat and deliver drinking water and wastewater.
  • Congress listened to our concerns as it pertains to appliance and equipment standards. The new energy bill enacts standards for 16 additional commercial and residential products, such as exit signs, commercial refrigerators and freezers, clothes washers, commercial ice makers, and many other products. In addition, it directs rulemakings for four products (battery chargers and external power supplies, ceiling fans, vending machines, commercial refrigerators and freezers); sets associated test procedures, and requires DOE to report to Congress every 6 months on plans to prescribe all standards for which they have missed legal deadlines. The law also clarifies DOE’s authority to set standards for both functions of products with two major functions, as well as to regulate furnace fans and it preempts new state and local standards at date of enactment of new legislated standards and date of final rule for rulemakings. Also, on some new standards, federal preemption of state standards would be suspended if DOE fails to issue a required standard update.
  • Rozanne
  • The Alliance coined the term "Watergy" to describe the strong link between water and energy in municipal water supply and wastewater treatment systems.  [Majority of funding from USAID; also funded by REEEP, EF, Coca Cola, local utilities, etc.] The Watergy approach helps cities realize significant energy, water, and monetary savings by carrying out technical and managerial changes in water and wastewater systems, providing consumers with quality water while using a minimum of water and energy.  WHY IMPORTANT • It is important to pay attention to energy efficiency in the municipal water sector because water is heavy and it is distributed over large distances: every liter of water that passes through a water supply system has a significant energy cost, compounded by the money invested to produce it. • In addition to direct savings in energy and water, efficiency improvements in municipal water utilities generate impressive reductions in operating costs and often improve services, or access to water by underserved populations. Saving money in the municipal sector leaves more funding for public services that are often underfunded. • In developing countries, often one-third to one-half of the volume of water produced is lost to leaks and system inefficiencies. COST EFFECTIVE • Watergy measures pay for themselves extremely quickly, from a few months to 3 years. • Huge savings are the norm, at least 20% and often more. • Another important cost consideration is that cities need to get the most of the infrastructure they have. Watergy makes this possible and can defer the need for new infrastructure. Over more than a decade, the Alliance to Save Energy’s Watergy Program has helped more than 100 cities in nine countries realize annual savings of more than 20 million kWh of electricity and $5.3 million in operating costs.
  • WHAT IT IS • The Alliance coined the term "Watergy" to describe the strong link between water and energy in municipal water supply and wastewater treatment systems.  • Watergy makes the best use of two valuable resources that are in limit supply in many parts of the world, including Mexico. • The approach helps cities and utilities realize significant energy , water and monetary savings through technical and managerial improvements, that providing consumers with quality water and sewerage services while using a minimum of water and energy. WHY IMPORTANT • It is important to pay attention to energy efficiency in the municipal water sector because water is heavy and it is distributed over large distances: every liter of water that passes through a water supply system has a significant energy cost, compounded by the money invested to produce it. • Saving money in the municipal sector leaves more funding for public services that are often underfunded. • In Mexico, one-third of all water pumped is lost before it ever reaches the end user. COST EFFECTIVE • Watergy measures pay for themselves quickly, generally from a few months to 3 years. • As you’ll see from specific examples I’ll be providing, huge savings are the norm, at least 20% and often more. • Another important cost consideration is that cities need to get the most of the infrastructure they have. Watergy makes this possible and can defer the need for new infrastructure.
  • Municipality of Emfuleni
  • Alliance – played an advisory role to this project. [Main consultants – WRP] We provided technical advice to the utility and municipality: Helped identify problem and technical solution (pressure management). [The lower the pressure behind a leak the less water is going to escape through that leak.] So the project:    • Installed automated pressure management valves on each supply line. These valves continually modulate the flow of water in a way that ensures a lower constant downstream pressure. Controllers that automate valve function were also installed, allowing for operating pressures to be varied depending on the time of day.    • Reduced high bulk pressure; further reductions @ night: With the aid of installed controllers, downstream pressure was automatically reduced further during especially night times when real demand for water is almost zero. This dramatically reduced water wastage from leaking pipes and fittings.    • The total cost of the Pressure Management Installation was less than $800,000. The pressure management valves themselves were activated in late June 2005 and by the time the entire installation had been officially commissioned in September that year, the project had paid for itself through achieved water savings (i.e payback period of less than 3 months). In addition to providing technical advice, the Alliance helped boost the political will to carry out the project, by demonstrating previous successes with the Watergy program, and helping to design a low-risk strategy for the utility and municipality (based on a financing arrangement using a performance contract).
  • This workshop will provide insight into the potential for water utilities and municipalities to address both water scarcity and energy conservation simultaneously, achieving significant water and energy efficiency improvements by optimizing energy use, reducing energy and operating costs, and accruing energy and cost savings through technical and managerial interventions in water and wastewater systems.    The workshop will focus on opportunities for achieving significant energy savings in our existing water systems, drawing from the Alliance’s Watergy Program experience in more than 100 cities in developing countries, and leveraging the new resources available—as a result of legislation and stimulus funding—for water utilities’ investments in energy efficiency in the United States and other countries.   The speakers at the Workshop include: - Ramon Rosas, Mexico; - Michael Rabe, South Africa; - Pradeep Kumar, India; - Shawn O'Neill, Fairfax Water, U.S.; - John Butler, Bucks County Water & Sewer Authority. U.S.; - Darren Hollifield, JEA, U.S.   To register for the Watergy pre-conference workshop at the reduced fee, please RSVP to the Alliance to Save Energy’s Alexander Filippov ( [email_address] , 202.530.4345) or Hana Chmielewski ( [email_address] , 202.530.2221). For full access to all EE Global events, register online at https://www.online-reg.com/ASE/EEGlobal2010/ and be sure to indicate your plans to attend the workshop.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Kateri Callahan, President Alliance to Save Energy April 22, 2010 The Water-Energy Nexus: A Global Problem, with Local Solutions
    • 2.
      • A few words about the Alliance
      • National EE Efforts Impacting Water Use
      • “ Watergy”: A Proven Solution – Untried in the U.S.
      Presentation Outline
    • 3. What is the Alliance to Save Energy?
      • Mission:
      • To promote energy efficiency worldwide to achieve a healthier economy, a cleaner environment, and greater energy security.
      • Organization:
      • Staffed by 60+ professionals
      • 32 years of experience
      • $12 million annual budget
      • Recognized as the premier energy efficiency organization in the world
    • 4. The Alliance Around the Globe
      • Branch Offices in:
      • I ndia
      • South Africa
      • Mexico
      • Ukraine
      • Programs & Projects:
      • Watergy
      • Municipal Network for Energy Efficiency (MUNEE)
      • China Energy Efficient Windows Initiatives
      • REEEP Compendium of Best RE & EE Practices
      • Manual for Financing Municipal EE
    • 5. In the U.S.: A worsening situation…
    • 6. Government Policies & Programs Impacting Water
      • Appliance and Equipment Standards
      • Building Energy Codes
      • Incentives and Funding
        • Energy Star Rebate Program
        • $5.2 Billion Weatherization
        • Federal Tax Incentives
      • Voluntary Programs
        • Energy Star
        • Save Energy Now
    • 7. Federal Appliance & Equipment Standards
      • Example: EPACT 2005
      • Covers 16 additional commercial and residential products
        • Commercial refrigerators, freezers and air conditioners
        • Ceiling fans
        • Exit signs
        • Residential clothes washers and coin-op washers
    • 8. Building Energy Codes
      • ACES & ACELA include national energy codes with aggressive energy savings targets
    • 9. National Consumer Campaigns
      • Super Powers
      • EPA, NYSERDA, Alliance
      • Nationwide TV & Radio
      • Powerful $avings
      • DOE & Alliance Partnership
      • All Media Outlets
      • The Power is In Your Hands
      • Industry, DOE, EPA, Alliance
      • All Media Outlets, Web & Collateral
      Energy Hog DOE, Ad Council, Alliance, States All Media Outlets Web, Collateral Materials Eureka $mart House Energy-Efficiency Challenge NBC Universal, Industry, DOE, Alliance On Air, Web–Home Makeover Contest
    • 10. “ Watergy”: A Proven Strategy Lake Victoria Watergy project Watergy in South African schools EE in Caribbean Water Utilities
      • Term coined to describe strong link between water and energy in municipal water systems
      • Since 1997: has helped more than 100 cities
      • What does a Watergy Program involve?
        • Improving Pumping Systems:
        • System Automation
        • Management of Leaks
        • Metering and Monitoring
        • Incorporating Energy Efficiency at the Design Stage
    • 11. A Look at Success: WATERGY makes the best use of two valuable, limited resources: water & energy WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT?  Every liter of water that passes through a system has a significant energy cost .  Water sector efficiency leaves more funds for crucial and often underfunded public services .  In most developing countries, 1/3 to 1/2 of water produced is lost. AND IT’S COST EFFECTIVE …  Rapid Payback : generally from a few months to 3 years  Huge Savings : at least 20% in energy costs; much higher possible  Makes the most of existing infrastructure ; reduces the need for new supplies RESULTS: 20.8 million kWh and $5.3 million (100 cities)
    • 12. WHY WATERGY in the U.S.? WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT?  3% of U.S. energy consumption goes to deliver potable/waste water services = $4 billion in energy costs = 45 Million tons of GHGs AND IT’S COST EFFECTIVE…  Rapid Payback: generally from a few months to 3 years  Huge Savings: at least 20% in energy costs  EPA estimates 10% reduction in energy use would save $400 million annually
    • 13. PROBLEM • 80% of water flowing to homes lost through leaking plumbing fixtures! • Enough to fill two Olympic-size swimming pools every hour CASE STUDY: EMFULENI, South Africa
    • 14. TECHNICAL SOLUTION: Pressure Management • Automated pressure management valves on each supply line • Reduced high bulk pressure; further reductions @ night • $800,000 construction commissioned Sept 2005 FINANCING SOLUTION: Performance Contracting • Water pressure management firm acting as ESCO • Build-Operate-Train-Transfer to municipality after 5 years • Fees: firm gets 20% of savings EMFULENI, cont.
    • 15. RESULTS • Payback period: <3 months • Annual Savings: Money : US $ 3.8 million Water : 8 million kiloliters (kL) a reduction of >30% Energy : >14 million kWh • CO2 Reductions: 12,000 tonnes/year EMFULENI, cont.
    • 16.
      • Pre-Conference Workshop:
      • Tapping into Savings in the Water and Energy Efficiency Nexus: The Watergy Approach for Utilities and Municipalities
      • SPONSORED BY American Water Works Association (AWWA)
      • Monday, May 10 2010, 8:00-11:00AM
      • Washington, DC Convention Center
    • 17. Demand/Supply Side Synergy: A Recipe for Success
    • 18. Thank you! Contact information: Kateri Callahan [email_address] 202-530-2219

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