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Infrastructure and Investment Opportunities for Energy Efficiency in Buildings
 

Infrastructure and Investment Opportunities for Energy Efficiency in Buildings

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Vice President for Programs Jeff Harris (jharris@ase.org) discussed energy efficiency measures in new and existing buildings, as well as cross-cutting techniques for achieving maximum advantages. ...

Vice President for Programs Jeff Harris (jharris@ase.org) discussed energy efficiency measures in new and existing buildings, as well as cross-cutting techniques for achieving maximum advantages. Jeff’s work focuses on U.S. and international energy efficiency policies for buildings, appliances, and utilities, and market transformation through public sector leadership.

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    Infrastructure and Investment Opportunities for Energy Efficiency in Buildings Infrastructure and Investment Opportunities for Energy Efficiency in Buildings Presentation Transcript

    • Infrastructure and Investment Opportunities for Energy Efficiency in Buildings Visit with the Inter-American Development Bank Jeffrey Harris Vice President - Programs
    • Overview 1) Why buildings? 2) New Buildings 3) Existing Buildings 4) Cross-Cutting Strategies
    • Commercial Building Energy: Fastest Growth Percent Change, 2010 to 2030
    • Elements of a Zero-Energy Buildings Strategy Research and Development – Create new technology - RD&D Partnerships with Industry Incentives & voluntary programs – Create buyer demand - Tax incentives, rebates, loan guarantees, etc. - Utility programs (DSM, Demand Response, REPS/EEPS) Public Education – Build market share - Consumer education and awareness campaigns - Energy labels (equipment and buildings) Standards – Set a floor & trigger innovation - Appliance standards, building codes, vehicles - Utility Energy Efficiency Resource Standards (EERS) Public sector leadership – Reduce market risk Workforce development – Capacity building
    • Setting a Long-term Goal: “Net-Zero” Energy Defining NZE: A building that is designed, constructed, and operated: - To greatly reduce energy use (i.e. ~80%) - …and meet remaining energy needs from renewable sources - Carbon-neutral - Economically viable (net-zero cash flow)
    • Changing Policy Landscape for NZE Buildings Architecture2030, Cool Mayors, AIA “commitment” ASHRAE Std 90.1, Std 189, Advanced Guides NAHB Green Standard & ICC Green Code California AB 32 & Strategic Plan Federal goals for NZE - Existing & new buildings - Zero Energy Commercial Buildings Initiative 2007 EISA, 2008 tax credit extensions, 2009 ARRA Next: ACES, ACELA, ECJAPA… – and EPA regulation of GHGs (?)
    • Commercial Sector – Where Are We Today? “Net-Zero” Source: R. Anderson, NREL
    • Driving Efficiency through Building Energy Codes Federal legislation pending - 30% improvement in model energy codes by 2010 - 50% before 2020 2009 IECC Model Energy Code for Homes: - ~13% efficiency improvement over 2006 - Remainder of 30%+ goal in 2012 code cycle ASHRAE 2010 Goal (Commercial): 30% by 2010 Cumulative savings thru 2020: 4 quads (1015 Btu); ~230 million tons CO2
    • Multi-Level Alliance Strategy for Energy Codes 1) Code Advancement - EECC advocates for stronger Model Energy Code - BEECN pursues legislation for national code targets and funding 2) Code Adoption - BCAP & RECA pursue state by state action 3) Code Implementation (compliance) - BCAP technical support for statewide planning & implementation
    • Potential Savings from Codes By 2030 our nation could save each year: 8% of total building energy use $28 billion a year in consumer energy bills CO2 emissions of 46 million autos
    • New Codes Paradigm: 1) “Dynamic” Codes 1) Make regular code advancement the norm (create market expectation Energy Use of continuous improvement) 2) Prepare market for the next step: Training Incentives Recognition Years
    • New Codes Paradigm: 2) “Technology-Ready” Current approach: - We make decisions on a 30-50+ year asset based on ~5 year economics (builder or first owner) - Codes represent the low end of the “Valley of Economic Indifference” New approach: - Pay most attention to most permanent feature - Where feasible, build in “technology-readiness”
    • Existing Buildings: No Silver Bullets! “Deep” retrofits vs “opportunistic upgrades” Innovative financing (PACE, utility-bill financing, neighborhood targeting, etc.) Energy management as a process not an event (Retro-Cx, operator training, etc.) Feedback, benchmarking, energy rating & disclosure
    • Building Energy Rating and Disclosure Goals: - Make energy performance visible to the market - Capitalize (securitize) future $ savings Labeling approach: - Technically valid – and perceived as valid - Empirical – based on available data (or “default”) - Practical – consider cost vs value of information - Target key decisions (decision-makers) : Asset rating (buy/sell/rent/finance) Operational rating (manage, retrofit) Main EE features (all) - Universal (mandatory not voluntary)
    • Building Energy Performance: Labels, Labels, Everywhere!
    • Federal Building Successes – But a Steeper Path Ahead! 140 Actual site energy use 130 Actual Energy Use 10% Goal - 1995 (NECPA) Site Energy, 1000 Btu/sq.ft. 120 110 20% Goal - 2000 (EPACT) 29.6% Reduction, 2005 100 30% Goal - 2005 90 35% Goal - 2010 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 FISCAL YEAR
    • Putting It All Together: Zero Energy Commercial Buildings Initiative Authorized in EISA (12/07) Net-zero commercial building goals - 2030: New construction - 2050: Entire stock Broad government/industry consortium Comprehensive approach (R&D deployment) Coordinate (initiate) national and local actions - Measure, benchmark, disclose energy performance - R&D for critical technologies and systems - Demo’s: scalable, replicable system solutions - Transform market: Education/training, finance, appraisal, incentives, codes, buyer demand-pull
    • Leveraging Financial Resources Construction Bid Range: 5-15% “Waste” in Industry: 10-30% Cost of “green”: 0-5% Cost of ZEB: 0-20% Retrofit $200 Billion/year Energy Costs $150 Billion/year Deployment National Programs ZEB Program $2 Billion/yr $200 Million/yr New Construction $200 Billion/year 18
    • Thinking “Outside the [Building] Envelope…” Locational efficiency - Transit - Mixed-use Grid integration (“net-zero energy” framework is incomplete) - Smart grids - Microgrids Rediscover district heat/cooling Managing potable water (“use cascading”)
    • THANK YOU – Questions? Jeffrey Harris Vice President – Programs JHarris@ase.org 202 530 2243 www.ase.org