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Immersive Learning Workshop: Disruptive Padagogy

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These slides support the Immersive Learning Workshop given in Hong Kong in Dec 2013

These slides support the Immersive Learning Workshop given in Hong Kong in Dec 2013

Published in: Education, Technology
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  • Graduate Profile: Develop a course/program specific profile of what is expected graduates should “look like” Choose 10 of the 25 attributes that best describe the excellent graduate then prioritize them. Include these in context to help describe your graduate.
    Recruit Student Participation: Make the profile definition a group assignment, asking students to contribute to the definition. Possibly use a wiki to build knowledge.
    Request Feedback on Profile: Have students reflect on the profile and comment on it. ask them do they see this as personally attainable i.e. can they master it and does it it help their purpose for doing the course.
    Establish Learning Contracts: Set up personal learning contracts with students. Have them commit to doing all possible to fill that profile when they graduate.
    Sieve every teaching idea, activity and assessment through Autonomy, Mastery and Purpose:
    Autonomy: The urge to direct our own lives
    Mastery: The desire to get better and better at something that matters
    Purpose: The yearning to do what we do in the service of something larger than ourselves
  • Engage our emotions:  All about retention. Short term to long term memory Emotional engagement important "Brain Rules" by John Medina. Engage learners with story then facilitate retention with emotional levers such as humour, suspense, tension even shame
    Enable “failing forward”: or practice new skills and behaviours in a safe environment without fear of failure Learners can build their capacity to fix their mistakes as they would in the real-life situation.
    Promote critical thinking: Critical thinking is a learning outcome. Well designed simulations require participants to understand the situation they are facing, evaluate it, identity possible responses and choose the most appropriate solution
    Accelerate time: Learner can make a decision, implement it and experience its consequences all within the same exercise.
    Provide shared context: participants in the same simulation have a common reference point. They will learn from each other and more clearly understand what is going on.
    Trigger memories: Two types. 1. Context -based links scenario to real life.2. Language-based.  language should be like real life.
  • Identify the specific problem or issue that needs to be fixed.
    Envision the desired experience. What do you want people to experience when they go through the narrative? Is it a change in behavior? Is it the application of a new skill? Do you want to reinforce something they have been taught elsewhere? Or to allow them to fail forward in a safe environment? What is the outcome you are looking for?
    Determine the timeline in which this experience takes place. Is it during the course of an hour-long meeting? A day-in-the-life? A week-in-the-life? A year-in-the-life? This will provide some necessary context for the narrative and determine its scope.
  • Define success. How is success going to be measured in the experience? What are the learning objectives? Who are the stakeholders and how are they affected by a successful or unsuccessful learning outcome? Is there financial impact or only interpersonal? By truly understanding the scorecard, we can identify root challenges and how to successfully overcome them.
    Add conflict. Learners need to face a simulated challenge and solve it as they would in a real-life situation.
    Finish the story. After you finish the core narrative, you will be able to go back later and add branches if you like. These elements do not need to be detailed or formalised at this point—you just want enough information to provide a framework.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Disruptive Padagogy Stirring the Status Quo “Disruptive innovation is not a tactic. It’s a mindset.” Luke Williams: Disrupt Immersive Learning.. the Core of the Padagogy Wheel Disruptive Padagogy Presentation by Allan Carrington is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Based on a work at http://tinyurl.com/padwheelstory.
    • 2. Hong Kong Dec 2013 Online Resources You only need this one “tinyurl” webpage link http://tinyurl.com/allanspresentations
    • 3. Attributes and Motivation Developing a profile of excellence with student commitment Some Suggested Tactics ... this could change everything? Develop an Excellent Graduate Profile Recruit Student Participation Request Feedback on Profile Establish Learning Contracts “Getting the best use out of the Padagogy Wheel Model” Sieve every teaching idea, activity and assessment through the grid of Autonomy, Mastery and Purpose. Designing Outcomes Email: allan@designingoutcomes.net Disruptive Padagogy Presentation by Allan Carrington is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Based on a work at http://tinyurl.com/padwheelstory.
    • 4. At the Padagogy Wheel Core Immersive Learning Targets Engagement • Improves engagement • Tests & models attributes & capabilities Bullseye! • Challenges, choice & consequences • The big picture Podcast Ken Spero: “At the Padagogy Wheel Core: Immersive Learning Targets Engagement” Designing Outcomes Email: allan@designingoutcomes.net Disruptive Padagogy Presentation by Allan Carrington is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Based on a work at http://tinyurl.com/padwheelstory.
    • 5. Benefits of Immersive Learning Micro Sims • Engage our emotions • Enable “failing forward” • Promote critical thinking • Accelerate time • Provide shared context • Trigger memories Ken Spero Scenario-Based E-Learning Book
    • 6. Learning From and Building on Experience • Articulate Rapid eLearning Blog http://www.articulate.com/rapid-elearning • 3 Simple Steps: Challenge, Choices and Consequences • 7 Tips: for Better eLearning Scenarios
    • 7. Authoring Immersive Learning Micro Simulations ILMS •Getting Started •Step 1: Identify the specific problem or issue that needs to be fixed. •Step 2: Envision the desired experience. What is the outcome you are looking for? •Step 3: Determine the timeline in which this experience takes place. e.g. A week-in-the-life? Designing Outcomes Email: allan@designingoutcomes.net Disruptive Padagogy Presentation by Allan Carrington is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Based on a work at http://tinyurl.com/padwheelstory.
    • 8. Authoring Immersive Learning Micro Simulations ILMS •Getting Started •Step 4: Define success. How is success going to be measured in the experience? What are the learning objectives? •Step 5: Add conflict. •Step 6: Finish the story. After you finish the core narrative then add branches later. Podcast Ken Spero: “At the Padagogy Wheel Core: Immersive Learning Targets Engagement” Disruptive Padagogy Presentation by Allan Carrington is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Based on a work at http://tinyurl.com/padwheelstory.
    • 9. Simulation Authoring Job Aid • Four page questionnaire • For Designers and SMEs • Two approaches • • • Analytical Story Telling Help break the blank paper barrier Ken Spero Philadelphia USA
    • 10. Practice Makes ASTD Perfect Article TD 081213 Important: Please note this allows for a single view if you give your email, it may be a problem to revisit “Sometimes you can do everything right and still not get a good outcome. The scorecard provides the vehicle through which students can make sense of everything, to see what they did right in the situation and where the wrong came from. That allows us to truly encourage "failing forward" in a most constructive manner”. ASTD Podcast Episode 9.25 mins Ken Spero Philadelphia USA
    • 11. Workshop Activity • Break into teams of 4 or 6 (even numbers) • Share your planned simulation project • Have team members contribute to help you: specify the problem, define the experience and the intended outcome • Also build the timeline, define success and how it will be measured. Define the learning outcomes and add conflict (about 10 minutes) • Break into pairs and for the rest of the time finish the story concentrating on the core by completing the Scenario-Based eLearning Job Aid http://www.unity.net.au/padwheel/jobaid.pdf
    • 12. Getting Started Step 1: Identify the specific problem or issue that needs to be fixed. Step 2: Envision the desired experience. What is the outcome you are looking for? Step 3: Determine the timeline in which this experience takes place. e.g. A week-in-the-life? Step 4: Define success. How is success going to be measured in the experience? What are the learning objectives? Step 5: Add conflict. Step 6: Finish the story. After you finish the core narrative then add branches later.

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