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List of Modules

Compulsory
Level 1:
Information and Study Skills Management
Introduction to Accounting
Introduction to Ec...
Level 1 Compulsory Modules
MODULE TITLE:                        INFORMATION AND STUDY SKILLS
                                     MANAGEMENT
MODULE C...
AIMS
Achieving competence in acquiring information and developing study skills means
finding the right information and usi...
Intellectual Qualities

I1 Identify, analyse and synthesise materials from secondary source materials
I2 Use and understan...
CONTENT

Introduction: what to expect at University
A number of sessions will take place in the first week with the aim of...
TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS
Lectures will be used to explain and develop the skills identified as being important
to stu...
ASSESSMENT
This module is 100% coursework assessed. A number and variety of assessments are
employed which seek to measure...
100   % Coursework                              % Examination



READING LIST
The following reading list is indicative and...
Peck, J and Coyle, M (1999) The Student’s Guide to Writing: Grammar, Punctuation
and Spelling, Palgrave, Hampshire.

Race,...
MODULE TITLE:                     INTRODUCTION TO ACCOUNTING
MODULE CODE:                      ACF108
DATE OF REVISION:   ...
AIMS:

This module forms a foundation for the further study of the subject in later
Accounting modules. The aim of the mod...
CONTENT:
(i) Introduction to the history and development of financial and management
    accounting.

(ii)    The purpose ...
Brammer, J., Cox, D., Fardon, M., & Penning, A., Active Accounting, (1st Ed)
Osborne Books, 2005.
Collier, P., Accounting ...
MODULE TITLE:                     Introduction to Economics
MODULE CODE:                      ECO 102M1/M2
DATE OF REVISIO...
LEARNING OUTCOMES
A successful student will be able to show that he/she can:


KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
K1   Describe a...
CONTENT
   •   Economic issues and the economic problem
   •   Markets, demand and supply
   •   Elasticity of demand and ...
ASSESSMENT
The module will be assessed through a combination of coursework and examination.

Coursework Individual assignm...
MODULE TITLE:                      PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN RESOURCE
                                   MANAGEMENT
MODULE CODE:...
AIMS
The overall aim of this module are to provide students with an understanding of the role
and function of human resour...
CONTENT

Human Resource management and its context
An overview of human resource management today in relation to its origi...
TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS
This module will be delivered by a means of lectures and seminars. The lectures will
provide...
ASSESSMENT
This module is assessed by a combination of coursework and examination. The type of
assessment employed seeks t...
Bratton J and Gold. J (2003) Human Resource Management: theory and practice,
3rd edition. Macmillan Business: Basingstoke....
Human Resource Management Journal
International Journal of Human Resource Management
Personnel Review
People Management

K...
Principles of Marketing
MODULE TITLE:                     Organisation and Management
MODULE CODE:                      BMG119M1/2
DATE OF REVISIO...
LEARNING OUTCOMES


A successful student will be able to show that he/she can:


KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
K1   Identify...
CONTENT
   •   Introduction to Management: the Manager’s job, the evolution of Management
       thought, the Management f...
ASSESSMENT
This module is 50% coursework and 50% examination assessed.
Students are required to complete two pieces of cou...
Kreitner, R. (2004) ‘Management’, Boston, Mass: Houghton Mifflin Co.
Daft, R.L. (2006) ‘New Era of Management’, Ohio: Thom...
Level 2 Compulsory Modules
MODULE TITLE:             Business Research and Decision Making
MODULE CODE:              NEW
DATE OF REVISION:         20...
RATIONALE
Graduates in business and related fields must possess the necessary knowledge and
skills in order to generate, p...
Intellectual Qualities
I1   Evaluate and interpret data in the fields of business and management.
I2   Acquire, analyse an...
CONTENT

Section A – Business Research

Introduction to Research
Definitions, classification and use of research in the Bu...
TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS
In order to fulfil the objectives listed, the teaching approach will endeavour to
promote th...
ASSESSMENT
This module shall be 100% coursework, because of the nature of the theoretical and
practical mix, together with...
Recommended

Blumberg, B Cooper, D.R, and Schindler, P.S (2005) Maidenhead, Business
Research Methods, McGraw-Hill, 1-6184...
MODULE TITLE:                      BUSINESS SYSTEM IMPROVEMENT
MODULE CODE:                       BMG316
DATE OF REVISION:...
Aims

     •    Understand the roots of Operations / Quality Management theory and its
          application, in the moder...
Transferable Skills
T1       Communicate effectively both in writing and orally
T2       Possesses the ability to function...
TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS
Lectures will introduce and expand upon relevant theory about the particular subject
Seminar...
READING LIST

N.B. List is based on current texts which will be revised as more texts become
available


Required

Hill   ...
Journals and Related Publications

Harvard Business Review*
International Journal of Operations and Production Management*...
MODULE TITLE:                     MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING
MODULE CODE:                      ACF311M1/2
DATE OF REVISION:    ...
AIMS
Management accounting more specifically considers the requirements for information
internal to the organisation. This...
CONTENT
Accounting for Decision Making
Comparison of Marginal Costing and Absorption Costing. Break-even and Cost
Volume P...
ASSESSMENT
Assessment is a combination of coursework and examination.

Coursework 1: Individual assignment [25%]:

This wi...
MODULE TITLE:                     Managerial Development
MODULE CODE:                      NEW
DATE OF REVISION:          ...
LEARNING OUTCOMES
A successful student will be able to show that he/she can:


KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
K1   Identify t...
CONTENT

 Introduction to the course, and personal development and professional
 development within the workplace, includi...
LEARNING AND TEACHING METHODS

A lecture programme will introduce students to the topics and issues around
personal and pr...
READING LIST*
Required


WebCT Vista resources for this module – given the nature of this module, it will
tend to rely on ...
Level 3 Compulsory Modules
MODULE TITLE:                         Business Strategy
MODULE CODE:                          BMG 547M1/M2
DATE OF REVISIO...
AIMS
The aim of the module is to develop students’ ability to analyse the factors which will
determine whether a firm exce...
CONTENT

•   Understanding Strategy. What is strategy? Competitive Advantage. Measuring
    Competitive Advantage: Economi...
ASSESSMENT
Coursework 1 Individual (20%):
This is an individual assignment, assessing students’ knowledge, comprehension,
...
•   Barney, J.B. & Hesterley, W.S (2006) Strategic Management and Competitive
       Advantage; concepts and cases. Prenha...
MODULE TITLE:                       Entrepreneurship and Innovation
MODULE CODE:                        BMG558
DATE OF REV...
LEARNING OUTCOMES
A successful student will be able to show that he/she can:


KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
K1   appreciate...
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  1. 1. List of Modules Compulsory Level 1: Information and Study Skills Management Introduction to Accounting Introduction to Economics Principles of Marketing Principles of HRM Organisation and Management Level 2: Business Research and Decision Making Business Systems Improvement Management Accounting Managerial Development Level 3: Business Strategy Entrepreneurship and Innovation Macroeconomic and Business Environment Managerial Finance Optional Modules Level 2: Business Law Contemporary Economic Issues Financial Accounting Managing Employee Development Marketing Communications Market Research Organisational Behaviour Level 3: Advanced Financial Accounting Business Taxation International And Comparative HRM International Marketing HRM Strategy Marketing Management
  2. 2. Level 1 Compulsory Modules
  3. 3. MODULE TITLE: INFORMATION AND STUDY SKILLS MANAGEMENT MODULE CODE: BMG132M1 DATE OF REVISION: 2006 MODULE LEVEL: 1 CREDIT POINTS: 20 MODULE STATUS: Compulsory SEMESTER: 1/2 LOCATION: Magee E-LEARNING: Web supplemented PREREQUISITE(S): None CO-REQUISITE(S): None MODULE CO-ORDINATOR(S): Barrett, S, Dr TEACHING STAFF Barrett, S, Dr RESPONSIBLE FOR MODULE DELIVERY: HOURS: 200 Lectures 24 hrs Seminars 12 hrs Independent study 164 hrs (including assessment) TOTAL EFFORT HOURS: 200 hrs ACADEMIC SUBJECT: BMG MODULAR SUBJECT: BMG RATIONALE The purpose of this module is to help students to adapt to the demands of studying at university level. The module introduces students to the structure and content of their chosen programme of study, as well as the university and its resources. Some of the main challenges faced by students in this transition phase include the ability to understand expectations of them and the acquisition of requisite skills for academic achievement. This module seeks to develop student knowledge, understanding and capability in these areas, thus enhancing the student experience and student performance overall.
  4. 4. AIMS Achieving competence in acquiring information and developing study skills means finding the right information and using it appropriately in your work. This might involve using computers and the internet as well as paper-based materials. Students may already have used information skills at school or college, however, the scale of what they need to do (and what they can do) is likely to be quite different at university. This module is designed to provide students with a foundation in the core learning tools and skills, which are required throughout their time at university. To help students to achieve academic excellence, they will be taught skills and learning techniques such as: • determining their individual learning style; • conducting a literature search and review; • preparing assignments for submission; • the use of appropriate referencing and bibliographic techniques; • how to access and use appropriate literary and electronic resources; • effective participation in lectures and seminars; • preparation for examinations; and, • how to deliver an effective presentation. A further aim of this module is to introduce students to Personal Development Planning (PDP) and how this contributes to the development of a number necessary skills identified as part of PDP. LEARNING OUTCOMES A successful student will be able to show that he/she can: Knowledge and Understanding K1 Recognise the structure and content of the course and the type and level of commitment required. K2 Demonstrate the skills necessary to perform at a good academic standard. K3 Show competence in the use of library resources. These include both hard copy resources and electronic databases used to source academic materials, journals and other relevant information. K4 Recognise the importance of key transferable skills at university such as written and oral communication, working with others, working independently, problem solving and reflection.
  5. 5. Intellectual Qualities I1 Identify, analyse and synthesise materials from secondary source materials I2 Use and understand the Harvard Referencing system and its application I3 Construct and defend a reasoned argument in class presentations I4 Competently employ the skills required to carry out a literature search and review Professional/Practical Skills P1 Use information technology, especially WebCT and electronic databases, to assist in academic study P2 Perform effectively in a team environment P3 Participate in class discussions that develop from topics studied P4 Complete presentation and written assignments in a way that demonstrates thoughtful information gathering, reflection on arguments presented, as well as detailed referencing in written assignments Gain confidence in making presentations as part of module assessment Transferable/Key Skills T1 Build competence in written and oral communication T2 Build a sound communication skills base through effective team participation T3 Learn through feedback from tutor and peers Take responsibility for your learning through effective planning, preparation and time management Set personal goals and manage time effectively
  6. 6. CONTENT Introduction: what to expect at University A number of sessions will take place in the first week with the aim of providing an introduction to the university and an overview of the programme for students. Students will be introduced to the range of services offered by the University to assist and support them during their time at University. Learning Resource Services and Teambuilding Focuses on library services, the library catalogue and library homepage navigation. The lecture is designed to provide students with a general introduction to the library and the available services and facilities. The lecture also examines the role and importance of team membership as part of your academic experience. Reading and Note-taking at University Addresses the importance of effective written (and oral) communication as a principal research and study tool. It will offer students an appropriate structure to use in taking relevant and accurate notes, both in lectures and in preparation for examinations and will, in addition, cover the importance of time management and correct spelling, vocabulary and grammar. Literature Search and Literature Review Examines the need for, and process of, conducting a literature search and review. The generic assessment criteria for qualitative work and the importance of critical thinking will also be addressed. E-Resources and Assignment Preparation Introduces students to the university’s electronic resources, citation and evaluation of results. Also builds on previous lectures in addressing good assignment preparation; structure; style and content; editing, proofing and drafting and argument and description. Knowledge gained to date is consolidated to equip students with the necessary skills to prepare and complete assignments. Referencing Your Work: The Harvard Referencing System Addresses the rationale for referencing written work, plagiarism (conscious and unconscious) and the recommended technique for full and accurate referencing of your work. Writing for Business Underpinning the former lecture topics, a series of seminar workshops will be held to teach, develop and assess the skills necessary for effective writing for business. This will be an ongoing process throughout the semester. Making Effective Presentations Assists students in developing the very important skill of making an effective presentation. The skill of presenting is one which will be required at university and in the world of work and it is imperative that students understand and learn the fundamental principles which underpin effective presentations. Personal Development Planning Introduces students to the rationale for Personal Development Plans (PDP). PDP
  7. 7. TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS Lectures will be used to explain and develop the skills identified as being important to students in making an effective transition to third level study (K1-K4, I2, I4, P1, T4, T5). Lectures will provide the framework for directing independent student learning activity and skills development. As such, students will be presented with relevant information, tasks and source material in lectures that will enable self-directed learning. Seminars will be employed to supplement student learning in writing for business (I4, P4, T1-T2, T5). Supplementary tutorials will be employed where necessary to assist those students who experience difficulty in developing relevant skills. Students will be directed to read relevant texts and to use the extensive learning materials online. The module is web supplemented i.e. module materials are available to students through WebCT. In addition, some of the assessment elements will be delivered to students through WebCT.
  8. 8. ASSESSMENT This module is 100% coursework assessed. A number and variety of assessments are employed which seek to measure the skills developed within the module as well as student achievement in respect of the learning outcomes. Student attendance is also assessed in this module, the purpose of which is to encourage regular attendance at all classes (10% of module marks). It is important to note that given the nature of this module, the content is revised annually, and modified where appropriate, to take account of student feedback and students changing needs. As such, the specific types of assessment may vary slightly in any given year. However, the following is a blueprint of how students are assessed in this module: Coursework 1, 2 and 3 Individual - WebCT based Quiz [5% each; 15% total]: The first three pieces of assessment are used to encourage students to become familiar with university systems, policies and resource/facilities. Each of the three pieces of coursework represents 5% of the total module mark. The respective assessments are based on student knowledge and understanding of the student handbook; the learning resource centre; and e-resources. Question format uses a combination of multiple choice and true/false questions. This assessment is completed on an individual basis using WebCT. These assessments will measure the student’s achievement of module learning outcomes K1, K2 and P1. Coursework 4: Literature Review [25%] In this assessment students are required to submit a literature review on an assigned topic. Students must research, write and accurately reference this assignment on an individual basis. This assessment represents 25% of the module marks. The assessment will measure the student’s achievement of module learning outcomes K2, K3, I1, I2, I4, P1, P3, T1, T2, T4. Coursework 5: Peer Assessment Exercise [10%] This assessment develops and measures student ability in the task of critiquing the work of others. The purpose of this assessment is to enhance student awareness of the essential components that are assessed as part of written assignments (in preparation for the many assignments that will be submitted at university) and to develop student skills in evaluation and feedback. This is a team submission and represents 10% of the module marks. This assessment will measure the student’s achievement of module learning outcomes I2, P1, P2, P4, T1, T2, T3, T4. Coursework 6: Examination Experience [10%] This assessment requires students to complete an examination question under examination conditions. The purpose of the assessment is to give students practice in doing exams at university level and to test their ability to write effectively under such conditions. Not only will this provide students with important practice in writing for examinations, it also offers valuable feedback for student success in future examinations. This assessment is worth 10% of the total module marks.
  9. 9. 100 % Coursework % Examination READING LIST The following reading list is indicative and is updated on an annual basis. Required Reading Oxford English Dictionary or Collins Dictionary and a Thesaurus. Recommended Reading Barnet, S & Stubbs, M. Barnet & Stubbs’s Practical Guide to Writing, Harper Collins, 1995. Cameron, S (2005) Business Student’s Handbook: learning skills for study and employment (3rd edition), Prentice Hall, Essex. Cottrell, S (2003) The Study Skills Handbook, Macmillan Press Ltd., London. Shelf No: Cottrell, S (2003) Skills for Success: The Personal Development Planning Handbook, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Drew, S and Bingham, R (2001) The student skills guide, Aldershot, Gower. Ellison, P (2006) Business English for the 21st Century, 4th edition. Pearson Education, London. Fairbairn, G (2001) Reading at university: a guide for students. Open University Press, Buckingham. Hamilton, D (2003) Passing exams, a guide for maximum success and minimum Stress, Cassell, London. Hart, C (2001) Doing a Literature Search. Sage Publications: London. Hart, C (1998) Doing a Literature Review. Sage Publications: London. Heath, J (2002) Teaching and writing case studies: a practical guide (2nd edition), The European Case Clearing House, England. McIlroy, D (2003) Studying at University: How to be a successful student, Sage Publications: London. Moran, A (2000) Managing your own learning at university: a practical guide, University College Dublin Press, Dublin. Payne, E and Whittaker, L (2000) Developing Essential Study Skills, Pearson Education Ltd., London.
  10. 10. Peck, J and Coyle, M (1999) The Student’s Guide to Writing: Grammar, Punctuation and Spelling, Palgrave, Hampshire. Race, P (1999) How to get a good degree, Open University Press, Buckingham. Turner, J (2002) How to Study: A short introduction, Sage Publications, London. SUMMARY DESCRIPTION The module establishes a strong foundation for students as they make the transition to become effective learners at third level. As such, the module identifies, develops and assesses a range of skills that are important for academic achievement. Areas of study within the module include reading at university level, literature search and review, assignment preparation, referencing, and making effective preparations. In this module, student learning, progression and achievement is closely monitored and supported by the module coordinator.
  11. 11. MODULE TITLE: INTRODUCTION TO ACCOUNTING MODULE CODE: ACF108 DATE OF REVISION: 2006 MODULE LEVEL: 1 CREDIT POINTS: 20 MODULE STATUS: Compulsory SEMESTER: 1/2 LOCATION: Magee E-LEARNING: web supplemented PREREQUISITE(S): CO-REQUISITE(S): None MODULE CO-ORDINATOR(S): McAree, D, Dr TEACHING STAFF RESPONSIBLE McAree, D, Dr FOR MODULE DELIVERY: HOURS: Lectures 24 Seminars 12 Independent study 164 (including assessment) TOTAL EFFORT HOURS: 200 ACADEMIC SUBJECT: ACF MODULAR SUBJECT: ACF RATIONALE Accounting is the medium by which business entities record transactions. It provides the means through which interested parties can assess performance and the financial standing of such businesses. This module largely examines the conventional accounting model in order to demonstrate how the requirements and needs of the users of accounting information are met. The limitations of the model for decision making purposes will also be addressed.
  12. 12. AIMS: This module forms a foundation for the further study of the subject in later Accounting modules. The aim of the module is to provide students with an academically challenging and intellectually stimulating study of foundation accounting. It focuses on the skills and techniques appropriate to practical accounting, as well as providing an understanding of basic accounting theory. LEARNING OUTCOMES A successful student will be able to show that he/she can: KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING K1 Understand the concepts, theories and practice of accounting. K2 Understand the decision-making needs of internal and external users of Accounting information. K3 Explain the limitations of financial reports for decision-makers. K4 Understand at an introductory level, the impact of alternative recognition rules and valuation bases. K5 Understand the methods and processes by which financial data is collected, recorded and reported. Prepare, present and analyze financial information for sole-traders and ‘not- for-profit’ entities. INTELLECTUAL QUALITIES I1 Evaluate the theoretical development of Accounting as an academic discipline. I2 Formulate responses to well defined accounting problems.. PROFESSIONAL/PRACTICAL SKILLS P1 Record economic transactions in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles (appropriate to a foundation module). P2 Prepare the financial reports for basic business entities. P3 Interpret, at an introductory level, the financial results of basic business entities. P4 Relate knowledge of accounting theories to practical accounting problems, at an introductory level. TRANSFERABLE/KEY SKILLS T1 Structure and communicate ideas both quantitatively and in writing. T2 Progress study, via independent and self-managed learning. T3 Accurately manipulate data. T6 Manage time and work to deadlines. T7 Learn effectively for the purpose of continuing professional development and in a wider context throughout their career.
  13. 13. CONTENT: (i) Introduction to the history and development of financial and management accounting. (ii) The purpose of accounting, the nature of useful information and the users of accounting information. (iii) The mechanics of the collection of accounting information; double entry; journals; accruals; prepayments; stock adjustments; depreciation; bad debts; provisions; treatment of errors; control accounts; and bank reconciliations. (iv) Preparation of financial statements (balance sheets, and profit and loss accounts): single and incomplete records; sole traders; and non-profit making entities. (v) The role of accounting theory and the nature of different accounting theories. (vi) Introduction to the regulation of accounting practice. (vii) Introduction to the interpretation of financial statements. TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS: Basic theories and concepts will be introduced mainly via formal lectures. Seminars will be used to provide students with the opportunity to apply their knowledge. ASSESSMENT: Assessment is by a combination of coursework and examination: Coursework 1 WebCT Quiz [25%] This assignment comprises a series of weekly assessments, using online or other resources as appropriate. Weekly assessment activities will be based upon the specific learning outcomes identified in the lecture plan for each week. The weekly assessment activities are intended to provide continuous formative and summative assessment. The weekly assessment activities are compulsory and jointly, will assess the stated learning outcomes. Examination [75%] The examination is 3 hours long and normally comprises 5 questions, from which candidates are required to answer any 4 questions. 25% Coursework 75% Examination RECOMMENDED READING: Fardon, M., and Cox, D., Accounting, (2nd Ed), Osborne Books, 2005. Wood, F., and Sangster, A., Business Accounting 1, (10th Ed) Pearson Education, 2005. INDICATIVE READING:
  14. 14. Brammer, J., Cox, D., Fardon, M., & Penning, A., Active Accounting, (1st Ed) Osborne Books, 2005. Collier, P., Accounting for Managers, (2nd Ed), Wiley, (2006). Cox, D., and Fardon, M., Management of Finance, (1st Ed) Osborne Books, 2005. Jones, M., Accounting, (2nd Ed), Wiley, 2006 Wood, F., & Sangster, A., Business Accounting, Vol 1, (10th Ed), Pearson, 2005. JOURNALS: Accountancy; Accountancy Ireland; Financial Management (UK); The Certified Accountant INTERACTIVE: www.cimaglobal.com www.icaew.co.uk www.icai.ie VIDEO: Where Does All the Money Go? TV Choice, London, (2006). Managing the Money, TV Choice, London, (2006). Finance In Business I: Finance for Starting a Business, TV Choice, London (2006). Finance In Business II: The Established Business/The PLC, TV Choice, London (2006). SUMMARY DESCRIPTION: Introduction to Accounting provides an introduction to financial and management accounting. The background to the requirement to produce, and the purpose of preparing financial statements is examined. The module introduces the student to the preparation of basic financial statements for sole-traders, and non-profit making entities, explaining why different formats are required for different types of organisation.
  15. 15. MODULE TITLE: Introduction to Economics MODULE CODE: ECO 102M1/M2 DATE OF REVISION: 2006 MODULE LEVEL: 1 CREDIT POINTS: 20 MODULE STATUS: Compulsory SEMESTER: 1/2. LOCATION: Magee E-LEARNING: Web supplemented PREREQUISITE(S): None CO-REQUISITE(S): None MODULE CO-ORDINATOR(S): Tuohy, G TEACHING STAFF RESPONSIBLE Tuohy, G FOR MODULE DELIVERY: Lectures 24 hrs Seminars 12 hrs Tutorials Practicals Independent study 164 (including assessment) TOTAL EFFORT HOURS: 200 hrs ACADEMIC SUBJECT: ECO ECO MODULAR SUBJECT: RATIONALE The purpose of this module is to provide an introduction to the fundamental concepts and principles of economics. It provides an essential underpinning for more advanced study of economics and economic issues. AIMS This module aims to develop students’ knowledge and understanding of the basic principles of economics and their relevance in a variety of contexts.
  16. 16. LEARNING OUTCOMES A successful student will be able to show that he/she can: KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING K1 Describe and discuss the key elements of the economic environment within which economic agents including businesses operate; K2 Identify and explain key principles, concepts and theories in economics. K3 Apply economic concepts to a range of economic problems and issues. K4 Discuss the relevance of economics in a variety of contexts. INTELLECTUAL QUALITIES I1 Acquire and analyse economic data and information. I2 Apply key economic concepts to some real world problems. I3 Identify, define and explore some economic issues. I4 Identify assumptions, define terms and evaluate statements in economics. PROFESSIONAL/PRACTICAL SKILLS P1 Gather, organise and present economic data P2 Utilise economic data sources to investigate economic issues P3 Analyse and interpret economic data P4 Use the internet to retrieve and manipulate text and data TRANSFERABLE SKILLS T1 Communicate effectively using a variety of media and reporting formats T2 Use information technology T3 Engage in problem solving T4 Manage time effectively Reflect on experience.
  17. 17. CONTENT • Economic issues and the economic problem • Markets, demand and supply • Elasticity of demand and supply • The supply decision • Revenue and profit maximization • Market structures • Alternative aims of the firm • Labour markets • Market failures and government policy • Macroeconomic problems and macroeconomic objectives • National income and the role of fiscal policy • Unemployment, inflation and growth • Money, interest rates, and monetary policy TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS A variety of teaching and learning methods will be used including lectures, seminars, case studies and Web-based learning packs. The module is web supplemented and will be delivered using the WebCT Vista environment. Lectures and seminars are the primary method of knowledge transfer. Lectures will provide both an overview and analysis of the subject matter, as well as an opportunity for guidance relating to reading and related course materials. Seminars will enable students to review material covered in lectures, to engage in online interactive activities so as to test their knowledge and understanding of the topics covered in lectures, to develop their analytical skills through the application of economic theory to actual economic problems, current issues and case studies, and to prepare for assessment through study of relevant problems and questions. The Web based materials will provide students with a range of “interactive” materials designed to deepen their knowledge and understanding of key concepts and issues in economics. Intellectual qualities will be developed through lecture, seminars and small group activities. In small groups, students will engage in participative and integrative learning activities including analysis of actual economic issues and case studies. Practical and transferable skills will be developed mainly through seminars, small group sessions and computer-based activities.
  18. 18. ASSESSMENT The module will be assessed through a combination of coursework and examination. Coursework Individual assignments (50%) The coursework will comprise a series of online class tests (including multiple choice and short answer questions) and case studies. These will assess students’ knowledge and understanding of, and ability to apply key concepts and theories in economics. The class tests/case studies will measure the student’s achievement of module learning outcomes K1, K2, K3, K4, I1, I4, P1, T2 and T4. Examination: (50%) The examination will comprise a 2-hour paper with 6 questions in which there will be an element of choice. Students will be expected to answer 3 questions. The examination will measure the student’s achievement of module learning outcomes s K1, K2, K3, K4, I2, I3, I4, T1 and T4 will be assessed. 50% Coursework 50% Examination READING LIST Required Reading: Sloman, J. (2004) Essentials of Economics 3rd edition Prentice Hall Recommended Reading: Begg, D, S Fischer & R Dornbusch (2003) Foundations of Economics (2nd ed), McGraw-Hill. Sloman, J. (2006) Economics (6th ed) Financial Times Prentice Hall Griffiths, A. and Wall, S. (2005) Economics for Business and Management: A Student Text Prentice Hall. Hornby, W., Gammie, B. and Wall, S. (2001) Business Economics Prentice Hall Neillis,J and Parker,D. (2000) Principles of Business Economics Prentice Hall Parkin,M. Powell, M., & Matthews, K., (2005) Economics (6th ed), Addison-Wesley Worthington, I., Britton, C. and Rees, A. (2005) Economics for business: Blending Theory and Practice (2nd ed) Prentice Hall Journals and Newspapers Business Week (www.businessweek.com ) Financial Times (www.ft.com ) Economist (www.economist.com Business Sections of Times, Independent, Guardian and Irish Times, etc (daily/Sunday) SUMMARY DESCRIPTION This module introduces students to the fundamental concepts and principles of economics and provides an essential underpinning for more advanced study of economics and economic issues.
  19. 19. MODULE TITLE: PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT MODULE CODE: BMG399M1/2 DATE OF REVISION: 2006 MODULE LEVEL: 1 CREDIT POINTS: 20 MODULE STATUS: Compulsory SEMESTER: 1/2 LOCATION: Magee E-LEARNING: Web supplemented PREREQUISITE(S): None CO-REQUISITE(S): None MODULE CO-ORDINATOR(S): Barrett, S TEACHING STAFF Barrett, S RESPONSIBLE FOR MODULE DELIVERY: HOURS: Lectures 24 hrs Seminars 12 hrs Independent study 164 hrs (including assessment) TOTAL EFFORT HOURS: 200 hrs ACADEMIC SUBJECT: BMG MODULAR SUBJECT: BMG RATIONALE This module is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the issues and challenges associated with the management of human resources. To achieve this, the module examines theory and current practice in the field of Human Resource Management (HRM).
  20. 20. AIMS The overall aim of this module are to provide students with an understanding of the role and function of human resource management as part of the overall management of organisations. A further aim of this module is to reflect on the contribution and the importance of human resource management in organisations. LEARNING OUTCOMES A successful student will be able to show that he/she can: Knowledge and understanding K1 Identify in a theoretical and applied context the concept of human resource management, its definition and its origins K2 Recognise the internal and external factors which influence how people are managed in organisations K3 Identify the organisational conditions that determine the propensity of organisations to practice effective human resource activities K4 Explain the importance of adopting a human resource strategy in organisations Intellectual qualities I1 Identify and synthesise relevant materials from multiple sources to assist in the understanding of human resource management concept and practice I2 Engage in informed discussion about the role of human resources in organisations I3 Analyse the relevance of information to illustrate learning and understanding Learn through the sharing of ideas and experiences with peers Professional/Practical skills P1 Recognise and utilise own and others contributions in group processes P2 Use information technology to source relevant and current information P3 Communicate effectively in discussions and as part of a team Develop and demonstrate interpersonal skills, including effective listening, negotiation and team membership Transferable skills T1 Present qualitative information in an appropriate format for your intended audience T2 Learn and enhance personal effectiveness through feedback from lecturers and peers. Set personal goals, solve problems, and manage time effectively
  21. 21. CONTENT Human Resource management and its context An overview of human resource management today in relation to its origins, the main functions of human resource management and the need to sustain the human resource management function in the dynamic organisational context. Outlines the range of activities associated with human resource practitioners. Compares and contrasts personnel management and human resource management. Addresses the role and importance of effective organisational communication within the context of effective management of human resources. Resourcing Introduces the concept of human resource planning - its aims and uses. Assesses the demand and supply of labour within an organisational context. Investigates the limitations of human resource plans. Defines the various aspects of an employer's recruitment strategy. Examines different types of selection methods, their attributes and shortfalls. Investigates the implications of the recruitment and selection process to the overall success of the organisation. Explains the strategic role of performance management. Demonstrates the link between performance management and effective people management. Describes the different components of a performance management process. Identifies key factors associated with success in performance management. Identifies the nature of work-life balance. Discussion of relevant legislation. Examines policy development in this area. Identifies the advantages and disadvantages of work-life balance to the employer and employee. Introduces the concept of conflict handling and resolution and identifies the organisational players involved. Differentiates between grievance procedures and disciplinary procedures and develops an understanding of the frameworks which exist for their operation. Reward Introduces the reasons for pay; different forms of rewards; and influences on rates of pay. Discusses reward strategy concepts, the relevance of motivation theory and aspects of employee commitment. Different types of job evaluation methods and highlights their advantages and disadvantages. Developments in employee-centres reward and pay structures. Identifies the major causes of gender pay inequality. Describes trends in pay and gender in the UK. Outlines key legal developments. Identifies measure taken by employers to reduce pay inequality. Employment Relation Discusses different theoretical perspectives applied to employee relations. Identifies the way in which employment relationships are managed. The mechanisms for employee voice and the impact on the psychological contract.
  22. 22. TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS This module will be delivered by a means of lectures and seminars. The lectures will provide the theoretical underpinnings and application of the subject matter. Lectures will also provide the framework for directing independent student learning activity (K1 – K4; I2-I4; T1, T3). Seminars will be used to develop and assess student learning. A blended approach will be used, employing WebCT for student quizzes as well as more traditional methods of seminar activity. This will allow students to discuss and share their knowledge and understanding in a more informal environment (I2-I4; P1, P2, P4; T2- T3). Students will be directed to read the required textbook. They will also be encouraged to supplement this reading with other recommended textbooks, relevant journal articles and other appropriate sources. Students will be expected to read independently to enhance their knowledge base and their understanding of relevant HR topics. The module is web supplemented.
  23. 23. ASSESSMENT This module is assessed by a combination of coursework and examination. The type of assessment employed seeks to measure student knowledge and understanding of the module content as well as the extent to which students have achieved the learning outcomes. Coursework 1: Essay (30%): This coursework consists of an essay based on an assigned topic. The title chosen will reflect the module content and students will be encouraged to read widely in their preparatory research. Students will be expected to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding through a combination of theoretical explication and relevant application. Assessment will be based on the quality of the essay content, structure, style and ability to present a well reasoned argument. This coursework contributes to the assessment of the following learning outcomes: K1, K2, K3, K4, I1, I4, P3, P4, T1, T2. Coursework 2: Series of Short Tests (20%): This coursework consists of a series of tests throughout the semester designed to assess student understanding. The quizzes will be a combination of multiple choice and short answer questions which will be completed in class and through WebCT. This element of coursework is formally assessed and also allows the close monitoring of student engagement overall. This coursework contributes to the assessment of the following learning outcomes: K1, K2, K3, K4, I1, I4, P3, T1, T2, T3. Examination [50%]: A 2-hour paper with between 6 and 8 essay type questions where students will have an element of choice in relation to which questions they answer. Student will be expected to answer 3 questions. The examination will measure the student’s achievement of learning outcomes: K1, K2, K3, K4, I1, I2, I3, I4, P3, P4, T1, T2, T3. 50 % Coursework 50 % Examination READING LIST Required Reading Foot, M and Hook, C (2005) Introducing human resource management. 4th edition. Prentice Hall: Harlow. Recommended Reading Armstrong, Michael, (2006) A handbook of human resource management practice, 10th edition. London: Kogan Page.
  24. 24. Bratton J and Gold. J (2003) Human Resource Management: theory and practice, 3rd edition. Macmillan Business: Basingstoke. Beardwell, I and Holden, L (2001) HRM: a contemporary perspective. 3rd Edition. Pearson Education: London. Cole, G (2002) Personnel and Human Resource Management, 5th edition. London: Continuum. Graham, HT and Bennett, GR (1995) Human Resources Management. 8th edition. Pitman Publishers: London. Legge, K (1995) Human Resource Management: rhetoric’s and realities. Macmillan Business: Basingstoke. McKenna, E and Beech, N (1995) The Essence of Human Resource Management. Prentice-Hall: Hemel Hemstead. Mabey, C (1998) Human Resource Management: a strategic introduction. 2nd edition. Blackwell Business: Oxford. Maund, L (2001) An Introduction to Human Resource Management: theory and practice. Hampshire: Palgrave. Mumford, A (1997) Management Development: strategies for action. 3rd edition. Institute of Personnel and Development: London. Redman, T and Wilkinson, A (2001) Contemporary Human Resource Management: Text and cases. Prentice Hall: Hemel Hempstead. Sutherland, J and Canwell, D (2004) Key Concepts in Human Resource Management. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. The Irish Employee Recruitment Handbook: finding and keeping a high quality. (1999) Oak Tree Press: Dublin. Torrington, D, Hall, L and Taylor, S (2001) Human Resource Management. 5th Edition. Prentice Hall: Europe, Berkshire. White, G and Druker, J (2000) Reward Management: a critical text. Routledge: London. Woodruffe Charles (1999) Winning the Talent War: a strategic approach to attracting developing…Wiley Publishers: Chichester. There is a wide range of electronic and print journals available. Please consult the following web address for further details - http://library.ulster.ac.uk/bus/hrm.htm. Below is a selection of recommended journals and databases to aid independent learning. Recommended Journals Harvard Business Review
  25. 25. Human Resource Management Journal International Journal of Human Resource Management Personnel Review People Management Key business and Management databases ABI Inform Business Source Premier Emerald LexisNexis Useful Web-sites http://www.acas.org.uk Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service http://www.dti.org.uk Department of Trade and Industry http://www.equalityni.org Equality Commission for Northern Ireland http://www.hseni.gov.uk Health and Safety Executive, Northern Ireland http://www.tuc.org.uk Trade Union Congress http://www.cipd.co.uk Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development SUMMARY DISCRIPTION This module is designed to enable students to understand the nature of, and the problems associated with, the management of human resources. The syllabus examines current practice, trends and challenges in the field of human resource management. Learning will take place through lectures, seminars and private study.
  26. 26. Principles of Marketing
  27. 27. MODULE TITLE: Organisation and Management MODULE CODE: BMG119M1/2 DATE OF REVISION: 2006 MODULE LEVEL: 1 CREDIT POINTS: 20 MODULE STATUS: Compulsory SEMESTER: 1, 2 LOCATION: Magee E-LEARNING: web supplemented PREREQUISITE(S): None CO-REQUISITE(S): None MODULE CO-ORDINATOR(S): Rowlandson, P TEACHING STAFF RESPONSIBLE Rowlandson, P FOR MODULE DELIVERY: Lectures 24 Seminars 12 Independent study 164 (including assessment) TOTAL EFFORT HOURS: 200 ACADEMIC SUBJECT: BMG MODULAR SUBJECT: BMG RATIONALE Organisations benefit from a systematic approach to managing work and people. Management is the unifying process behind all business activities. Management coordinates resources to accomplish organisational objectives. The Introduction to Management module is part of the Human Resources specialism and is a foundation module for Business Studies degrees. Management is the process of using organisational resources to achieve objectives through the functions of planning, organising and staffing, leading, and controlling. AIMS The aim of the module is to introduce the principles of effective, systematic management, and to introduce the component parts of organization structure.
  28. 28. LEARNING OUTCOMES A successful student will be able to show that he/she can: KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING K1 Identify and describe the management functions and understand how they work K2 Demonstrate a knowledge of the historical development of management and an awareness of recent developments K3 Appreciate the limitations of management theory and the importance of practice INTELLECTUAL QUALITIES I1 Analyse and evaluate the essential components of managerial processes and activities I2 Research and evaluate managerial problems and suggest solutions I3 Identify and describe the conceptual, human, and technical skills used by effective managers I4 Enhance and apply critical thinking skills to management theories and problems PROFESSIONAL/PRACTICAL SKILLS P1 Apply the methods and skills of organisational analysis P2 Illustrate and delineate structural components of organisations Design motivation programmes using goal-setting and monetary rewards TRANSFERABLE SKILLS T1 Develop analytic thinking skills and problem-solving skills T2 Develop basic systems analysis skills T3 Develop critical thinking skills
  29. 29. CONTENT • Introduction to Management: the Manager’s job, the evolution of Management thought, the Management functions, Management skills. • International Management, World Markets, Managing Diversity • Information technology and the Internet • Business ethics and social responsibility: benefits and costs of ethical business • Planning: operational and strategic planning • Problem solving and decision making: programmed and non-programmed decisions, bounded rationality, quantitative techniques • Organisation structure and design, organisational culture • Human Resource Management, Staffing, discipline, recruitment and selection • Leading, leadership, motivation, behaviour modification, job design • Communication, groups, teams • Controlling • Managing stress TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS Lectures will provide the framework for directing independent student learning activity and skills development. As such, students will be presented with relevant information, tasks and source material in lectures that will enable self-directed learning. (K1, K2, K4, I3, P3). Seminars will be employed to supplement student learning by case analyses and group discussion (K3, I1, I2, I4, P1, P2, P4). Students will be directed to read relevant texts and to use the learning materials online. The module is web supplemented i.e. module materials are available to students through WebCT. In addition, some of the assessment elements will be delivered to students through WebCT.
  30. 30. ASSESSMENT This module is 50% coursework and 50% examination assessed. Students are required to complete two pieces of coursework, both of which seek to measure the skills developed within the module as well as student achievement in respect of the learning outcomes. Coursework 1: Individual WebCT based quiz [25%] The first piece of coursework is designed to provide early diagnostic testing of students’ progression and engagement with the subject. This will typically comprise a WebCT quiz, usually a multiple choice test, and is based on the content of weeks 1-6. Student feedback is generated immediately through WebCT, and where problems are identified additional feedback and support can be provided. This is in line with Faculty Policy to provide feedback to semester 1 level 1 students by week 6. This assignment will measure the student’s achievement of learning outcomes: K1, I1, I4, T1. Coursework 2: Individual Essay [25%] The second piece of coursework will typically comprise a review of a Case Study of 1200 to 1400 words; Students will be assessed on their ability to answer the case questions in a coherent and logical manner, and on their written [word-processed] presentation skills. The assignment will draw on a range of learning skills. This assignment will measure the student’s achievement of learning outcomes: K2, K3, I2, I4, P1, P2, T2, T3. Examination [50%] The examination will comprise a 2-hour paper with 6 questions in which there will be an element of choice. Students will be expected to answer 3 questions. The examination will measure the student’s achievement of learning outcomes: K1, K2, K3, I1, I4, T2, T3. 50 % Coursework 50 % Examination READING LIST Required DuBrin, A., (2006) ‘Essentials of Management’, 7th edn., Thomson South-Western. The required text is a resource text and contains extensive references and web resources Recommended Cole, G.A. (2003) ‘Management Theory and Practice’ London: Thomson Learning
  31. 31. Kreitner, R. (2004) ‘Management’, Boston, Mass: Houghton Mifflin Co. Daft, R.L. (2006) ‘New Era of Management’, Ohio: Thomson South-Western. Daft, R.L. and Marcic, D. (2007) ‘Management: the New Workplace’, Ohio: Thomson South-Western. Rue, L., and Byars, (2005) L.L., ‘Management skills and applications’ Ohio: McGraw- Hill. Robbins, S.P., (2006) ‘Management’, Boston, Mass: Prentice-Hall. SUMMARY DESCRIPTION Management is the unifying process behind all business activities. Management coordinates resources to accomplish organisational objectives. The Introduction to Management module is part of the Human Resources specialism and is a foundation module for Business Studies degrees. Management is the process of using organisational resources to achieve objectives through the functions of planning, organising and staffing, leading, and controlling.
  32. 32. Level 2 Compulsory Modules
  33. 33. MODULE TITLE: Business Research and Decision Making MODULE CODE: NEW DATE OF REVISION: 2006 MODULE LEVEL: 2 CREDIT POINTS: 20 MODULE STATUS: Compulsory SEMESTER: 1, 2 LOCATION: Magee E-LEARNING: Web supplemented PREREQUISITE(S): None CO-REQUISITE(S): None MODULE CO-ORDINATOR(S): TEACHING STAFF Dr. F. Fitz, Dr. P. Muldowney, Ms H. Shiels RESPONSIBLE FOR MODULE DELIVERY: HOURS: Lectures 24 Seminars 6 Tutorials 0 Practicals 6 Independent study 164 (including assessment) TOTAL EFFORT HOURS: 200 ACADEMIC SUBJECT: BMG MODULAR SUBJECT: BMG
  34. 34. RATIONALE Graduates in business and related fields must possess the necessary knowledge and skills in order to generate, present, analyse and communicate both qualitative and quantitative data, so as to convert it into meaningful management information. In addition they should be competent in the use of appropriate IT skills which will enable them to efficiently retrieve recent and relevant business information. The key objective being to bridge the communication gap between providers and consumers. This module has both academic and vocational relevance, in that it will enable students to design and execute small-scale research projects in a variety of business fields. It will also enable them to analyse and critically evaluate business-related data which they will encounter throughout their programme of study. This module addresses key concepts in managing information and provides students with an understanding of how organisations may make effective use of information in decision making from strategic to operational levels. AIMS The aims of this module are : • To provide students with the fundamental understanding of the principles and systems underpinning data generation, analysis and communication within the fields of business and management. • To provide an understanding of the impact of information systems and information technology in the business environment • To expose students to the strategic implications of information systems for managing organisations LEARNING OUTCOMES A successful student will be able to show that he/she can: Knowledge and Understanding K1 Identify and define key concepts encountered in the generation, analysis and communication of data. K2 Discuss the use of tables, graphs and charts, together with numerical summaries, for reducing and describing data using both ICT and non-ICT methods. K3 Recognise the strategic importance of IT within organisation K4 Classify management decision making models and behaviours
  35. 35. Intellectual Qualities I1 Evaluate and interpret data in the fields of business and management. I2 Acquire, analyse and synthesise materials that assist in the understanding of information management I3 Consistently apply their knowledge and wider intellectual skills to collating, analysing and presenting information. I4 Evaluate current information systems implementation and use within organisations Professional/Practical Skills P1 Select appropriate data collection and analytical techniques for processing business data. P2 Use a range of ICT techniques for processing business data. P3 Apply concepts and models underlying business information systems to the real world through class discussions and/or case analysis P4 Perform effectively in a team environment Transferable skills T1 Use ICT skills to incorporate secondary data in presentation of business reports. T2 Convert business data into useful operational and management information. T3 Demonstrate competence in teamwork and interpersonal communications using a variety of media T4 Reflect on existing information systems practice and experience
  36. 36. CONTENT Section A – Business Research Introduction to Research Definitions, classification and use of research in the Business and Management Fields. Identification of stages in the research process; quantitative and qualitative research; commissioning research. Sources of Knowledge Non-scientific versus scientific, development of scientific method, induction, definition and the wheel of science. The role of theory in research. Key Issues in Research Design Formulation of Research Question(s). Units of analysis; Ecological and individual fallacies; Time dimension – cross-sectional and/or longitudinal; exploratory, descriptive and explanatory research designs. Overview of Main Positivistic and Phenomenological Methodologies/Strategies Section B – Business Data Analysis Definition, categories and application of statistics, key statistical concepts: descriptive and inferential statistics; stages in statistical inquiry; types and classification of variables; scales of measurement; statistical notation. Summarising data; statistical lay-out; frequency distribution tables; line graphs; pie charts; bar charts; histograms; frequency polygons; cumulative frequency curves. Measures of central location; arithmetic mean; median; mode; measures of dispersion; range absolute mean deviation; standard deviation; variance. The relationship between two variables – regression and correlation. Section C - Information Systems (IS) Information systems for managers: levels of management and their varying needs; strategic, tactical and operational decision-making; impact of IS on management. Management decision making: stages in the decision making process; models of management decision making Support systems: classification, characteristics and capabilities of support systems e.g. Decision Support Systems, Executive Information Systems, Executive Support Systems. Databases and Data Management: file organisation and processing; database concepts and organisation; DBMS, establishing and manipulating data tables; developing and manipulating input forms; developing reports.
  37. 37. TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS In order to fulfil the objectives listed, the teaching approach will endeavour to promote the development of research mindedness in students in that they: • develop the confidence to form ideas and ask questions; • become familiar with research methods and techniques; • be able to critically assess research reports; • be able to incorporate research methods into knowledge and practice; • be competent in the use of IT techniques for the reduction, analysis and presentation of both qualitative and quantitative data. Teaching will be conducted mainly by means of formal lectures, seminars and practical sessions: Lectures: Lectures will emphasise fundamental principles and concepts and relate them (as far as possible) to the business environment. As far as possible formal mathematics and mathematical proofs will be kept to a minimum and every effort will be made to ‘build up’ statistical expressions from basic elements. The emphasis will also be on explanation and the demonstration of understanding so that hopefully students will not only know how but understand why they are performing certain procedures. Seminars: Seminars will provide an opportunity for students to gain clarification and/or further illumination on either theoretical or practical aspects of recent lecture material and/or their own private studies. They will also provide an opportunity to revisit areas in which students may be experiencing some difficulty. Practicals: Practicals will provide an introduction to the use of SPSS statistical analysis package in reducing/condensing survey data. Students will be provided with the opportunity to generate process, analyse and present data on business-related topics.
  38. 38. ASSESSMENT This module shall be 100% coursework, because of the nature of the theoretical and practical mix, together with the range of learning outcomes to be assessed. Coursework 1: Class Test [30%] Students will be required to complete a time-constrained, unseen examination paper covering research methods and data analysis. This assignment will measure the student’s achievement of learning outcomes: K1, K2, I1, P1. Coursework 2: SPSS Practical assignment [30%] Students will be required to produce a Survey report utilising the SPSS software. This assignment will measure the student’s achievement of learning outcomes I1, I2, P1, P2, T1, T2. Coursework 3: Log Book [15%] Students will be required to maintain a written record or report of class and reading notes, practical calculations, self directed learning, class preparation and rough work. This assignment will measure the student’s achievement of learning outcomes K1, K2, I1, P1, K2, I1. Coursework 4: Group assignment [25%] Students will be required to complete a written assignment. This will typically consist of essay type questions, requiring an answer which will enable students to demonstrate an understanding similar to that required in a sessional examination. This assignment will measure the student’s achievement of learning outcomes: K3, K4, I2, I4, P4, T3 and T4. 100 % Coursework % Examination READING LIST Required Haag, S (2006) Management Information Systems for the Information Age, 5th Edition, McGraw-Hill, ISBN 007-110777-0. Oakshott, L (2006) Essential Quantitative Methods for Business, Management and Finance, London, Palgrave-Macmillan, 1-4039-4991-3. Saunders, M.N.K; Lewis, P and Thornhill, A (2005) Research Methods for Business Students, Harlow, Financial Times Prentice Hall, 004-188317-4.
  39. 39. Recommended Blumberg, B Cooper, D.R, and Schindler, P.S (2005) Maidenhead, Business Research Methods, McGraw-Hill, 1-6184-3011-8. O’Brien, J.A and Marakas, G.M (2006) Management Information Systems, 7th Ed, McGraw-Hill, ISBN 0-07-111629-X. Swift, L (2005) Quantitative Methods for Business, Management and Finance, London, Palgrave-Macmillan, 1-4039-3528-9. Turban, E, McLean, E, Wetherbe, J (2006) Information Technology for Management: transforming organizations in the digital economy, 5th ed., J Wiley & Sons. ISBN: 0-471-70522-5. Van der Velde, M, Jansen, P and Anderson, N (2004) Guide to Management Research Methods, Oxford, Blackwell, 1-4166-2173-2. Journals European Journal of Information Systems http://www.palgrave- journals.com/ejis/index.html Harvard Business Review http://harvardbusinessonline.hbsp.harvard.edu/b02/en/hbr/hbr_home.jhtml Industrial Management and Data Systems http://www.emeraldinsight.com/info/journals/imds/imds.jsp Information Management and Computer Security http://www.emeraldinsight.com/info/journals/imcs/imcs.jsp Internet Research http://www.emeraldinsight.com/info/journals/intr/intr.jsp Information Systems Research http://isr.pubs.informs.org/ or http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=1350-1917&site=1 Journal of Management Information Systems http://jmis.bentley.edu/ MIS Quarterly http://www.jstor.org/journals/02767783.html Online Information Review http://www.emeraldinsight.com/info/journals/oir/oir.jsp Supply Chain Management, An International Journal http://www.emeraldinsight.com/info/journals/scm/scm.jsp VINE: The Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems http://www.emeraldinsight.com/info/journals/vine/vine.jsp SUMMARY DESCRIPTION This module provides the knowledge and skills needed to generate, present, analyse and communicate both qualitative and quantitative data, so as to convert it into meaningful management information.
  40. 40. MODULE TITLE: BUSINESS SYSTEM IMPROVEMENT MODULE CODE: BMG316 DATE OF REVISION: 2006 MODULE LEVEL: 2 CREDIT POINTS: 20 MODULE STATUS: Compulsory SEMESTER: 1/2 LOCATION: Magee E-LEARNING: Web supplemented PREREQUISITE(S): None CO-REQUISITE(S): None MODULE CO-ORDINATOR(S): O’Donnell B .G.P. TEACHING STAFF O’Donnell B .G.P. RESPONSIBLE FOR MODULE DELIVERY: HOURS: Lectures 15 hrs Seminars 10 hrs Tutorials 5 hrs Practicals 6 hrs Independent study 164 hrs (including assessment) TOTAL EFFORT HOURS: 200 hrs ACADEMIC SUBJECT: BMG MODULAR SUBJECT: BMG RATIONALE The module is designed to address the critical environment in which Operations Managers operate, the challenges they face and the roles they play in the processes of planning, organising, leading, controlling, coordinating and improving organisational performance. Practical exercises will reinforce the work done in the previous sessions to ensure understanding and ability to articulate and communicate the content
  41. 41. Aims • Understand the roots of Operations / Quality Management theory and its application, in the modern business environment. • Map the development of the “Quality Revolution”, understanding the key tenets of past and current systems and analysing their suitability for 21st century business • Comprehend and articulate the need for adequate, customised, Integrated systems within organisations and in their supply chains. • Use and critically evaluate simple models and apply quantitative techniques to the solution of operations based problems. • Identify and comment on the strategic contribution of Operations / Quality Management, in the achievement of organisational objectives. • Compare modern management theories and developments in operations management Learning outcomes A successful student will be able to show that he/she can: Knowledge and Understanding K1 Recognise the integrated , dynamic nature of business and the role business systems / Operations management plays in business success K2 Review and indicate how relevant theory has metamorphosed to fit the dynamic business environment of the twenty first century K3 Recognise, translate, and be able to respond positively to the demands placed on them in their placement. Intellectual Qualities I1 Apply and tabulate, basic models used in operations management. I2 Exercise appropriate judgment in finding, extracting and presenting pertinent information To exhibit an understanding of the operations / quality role within an organisation. I3 Argue the premise that the satisfaction of customer expectations is a vital performance indicator of organisational success. Professional/Practical Skills P1 Interpret information to enable management to formulate sufficient, measured responses to business issues P2 Undertake modelling / scenario exercises to provide management with reliable information with which to make decisions
  42. 42. Transferable Skills T1 Communicate effectively both in writing and orally T2 Possesses the ability to function in an individual capacity or in a team environment with equal skill T3 Possess the numeric and qualitative skills to provide useful, timely and comprehensive information on any area as required CONTENT • The Evolution of Operations Management. • New Product Introductions. • Facility Location & Trade Offs. • Supply Chain Management. • Inventory Management Techniques. • Production Management Techniques. • The Development of Quality Theory. • Leadership and Systems Improvement. • Tools for Quality Improvement. • Change Management. • Project Management. • Outsourcing.
  43. 43. TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS Lectures will introduce and expand upon relevant theory about the particular subject Seminars will reflect on the material covered in the lectures, discuss the topics to ensure understanding and point the way to relevant study. Supplementary Teaching and Learning aids such as relevant Film is used to show leadership behaviour in specific circumstances and show how what is portrayed mimics leadership behaviour in real life organisational settings. Tutorials will explore the quantitative aspects and ensure the students understand how the various models work Students will be directed to read not only the set texts but to review the visual and print media and revert on general business and relevant technology news to exhibit understanding of the issues faced in the dynamic, unstable world that is business Students will be expected to contribute, interact and involve themselves in the subject The module is web supplemented ASSESSMENT Coursework 1 WebCT Quiz [25%]: The first piece of coursework is completed in week six and takes the form of a class test this is completed on line and shows a grasp of the underpinning theory of operations management. It includes qualitative and quantitative elements and covers the basic necessity for students of operations management to be numerate and able to understand and communicate the relevant content. This test contributes 15% of the overall mark. This assignment will measure the student’s achievement of module learning outcomes K1, K2and K3 I1, I2, P1,P2 T3 Coursework 2 Applied Project [25%]: The second piece of coursework takes the form of an assignment (which may or may not be based on a case study ) The assignment will seek to elicit from the student an understanding of the theory and the practical application of the theory using verifiable, real life scenarios and examples . This assignment may be individual or group work if the subject matter requires an in depth analysis beyond the agreed word limit. This assignment will measure the student’s achievement of module learning outcomes K1.K2,K3,I1,I3,P1,P3,T2,T3 Examination [50%]: The 3 hour Examination paper will comprise two sections, each section comprising 4 questions. Students are expected to answer two questions from each section. There may be one compulsory question in each section. Section 1 will assess on learning outcomes K1,K2,K3,I1,I2 P1,P2 and Section 2 will assess the learning outcomes K1,K2,I3,T1and T3. 50 % Coursework 50 % Examination
  44. 44. READING LIST N.B. List is based on current texts which will be revised as more texts become available Required Hill Operations Management Palgrave McMillan 2005 Dale BG Managing Quality (4th Ed) Blackwell 2003 Recommended Schroeder Operations Management McGraw 2004 Contemporary Concepts and Cases Lowson Strategic Operations Management Routledge 2004 Fitzsimmons/ Fitzsimmons Service Management McGraw Hill 2006 Slack, Chambers Operations Management Prentice Harland, Harrison (4th Ed.) Hall 2004 Johnston Waller Operations Management Thompson A Supply Chain Approach 2003 (2ndEd) Krajewski and Operations Management Ritzman Strategy and Analysis (7th Ed.) Prentice Hall 2005 Render and Heizer Principles of Operations Management Prentice Hall 2006 (8th Ed.) Griffin Ricky Fundamentals of Management Houghton Mifflin 2003 (3rd Ed) Taylor, Bernard W. Introduction to Management Science Prentice Hall 2002 (7th Ed) Hartley Robert Management Mistakes and Successes Wiley 2005 th (8 Ed) Render Barry Quantitative Analysis for Prentice Hall1997 th Stair Ralph Management (9 Ed) Evans and The Management and Control of West 1996 rd Lindsay Quality (3 Ed) Dean and Evans Total Quality management, Organisation and strategy (3rd Ed)West 2002 .
  45. 45. Journals and Related Publications Harvard Business Review* International Journal of Operations and Production Management* Sloan Management Review Benchmarking: An international Journal* International Journal of Production Economics* International Journal of Agile Manufacturing Systems* * Available on-line SUMMARY DESCRIPTION The world we live in is changing rapidly, Consumer needs are changing at an ever increasing pace, barriers to trade are falling and the local marketplace can be serviced from any and all parts of the world. This module portrays the role of the operations manager in the modern environment, it examines the continual balancing act, operations personnel perform between customer service and supply chain optimisation. It also examines the role of business systems improvement in providing new and innovative channels of product and service delivery.
  46. 46. MODULE TITLE: MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING MODULE CODE: ACF311M1/2 DATE OF REVISION: 2006 MODULE LEVEL: 2 CREDIT POINTS: 20 MODULE STATUS: Compulsory SEMESTER: 1/2 LOCATION: Magee E-LEARNING: PREREQUISITE(S): Introduction to Accounting ACF XXX CO-REQUISITE(S): MODULE CO-ORDINATOR(S): Devlin; RH TEACHING STAFF Devlin; RH RESPONSIBLE FOR MODULE DELIVERY: HOURS: Lectures 24 hrs Seminars 12 hrs Independent study 164 hrs (including assessment) TOTAL EFFORT HOURS: 200 ACADEMIC SUBJECT: ACF MODULAR SUBJECT: ACF RATIONALE Management accounting more specifically considers the requirements for information internal to the organisation. This module develops many of the concepts initially covered in modules Introduction to Accounting but covers to a greater depth basic techniques and applications of management accounting techniques.
  47. 47. AIMS Management accounting more specifically considers the requirements for information internal to the organisation. This module develops many of the concepts initially covered in modules Introduction to Accounting but covers to a greater depth basic techniques and applications of management accounting techniques. LEARNING OUTCOMES A successful student will be able to show that he/she can: Knowledge and understanding K1 discuss the basic principles and fundamentals of management accounting K2 apply these fundamental techniques of management accounting to solving a variety of business problems K3 analyse and evaluate management information with particular reference to cost ascertainment, planning, control and decision making K4 critically evaluate and interpret basic management accounting information Intellectual Qualities I1 Evaluate management accounting information in the context of product costing, planning, control and short-run and long-run decision-making. I2 Identify, interpret and analyse accounting information I3 Investigate, analyse, communicate and critically evaluate information in the solution of business problems Professional/Practical Skills P1 Record, summarise financial transactions in a management accounting format P2 Interpret and utilize management accounting information for various applications Transferable Skills T1 Display appropriate written communication skills to present information in a suitable format for the end-user T2 Demonstrate competency in IT skills T3 Display the ability to manipulate numerical information and problem-solving T4 Ability to study independently
  48. 48. CONTENT Accounting for Decision Making Comparison of Marginal Costing and Absorption Costing. Break-even and Cost Volume Profit Analysis. Introduction of the Contribution approach to decision -making. Relevant costing and short-term decision making situations; accounting issues in a modern manufacturing environment – Activity-based costing, Just-in-time manufacturing. Capital Investment Decisions Capital Investment evaluation; true value of money; PV tables; Appraisal methods payback, ARR, NPV and IRR; Risk assessment - sensitivity analysis, statistical profitability. Accounting for Planning Introduction to budgeting process. Preparation of functional and master budgets. Behavioural aspects of budgets. Evaluation of budgetary systems (e.g. ZBB, ABB, Rolling and Incremental). Accounting for Control Introduction to Standard Costing. Basic cost and sales variances identified and calculated. Significance and inter-relationship of variances. Relevance to business performance, measurement and control. Divisional performance measurement – ROCE and Residual income. Current issues in Management Accounting Cost management/reduction systems – target costing, life-cycle costing, value engineering, JIT etc. Strategic management accounting – the Balanced Scorecard. TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS Teaching will be conducted mainly by means of formal lectures, directed reading and seminars. Lectures will give students an understanding of the functions of management accounting as an information system and the techniques of planning control and decision-making (K1,K2, K3, I1,I2, P1,T1,) Seminars will give the students an opportunity to reinforce and consolidate the theoretical concepts and will allow the students to apply the practical techniques of problem-solving (K3, K4, I2,I3, P2, T2,T3,T4) Students will be directed to read relevant texts in order to encourage independent learning ( K1,K2,I2,I3, P2, T3,T1,T4) Module material is available on the Web.
  49. 49. ASSESSMENT Assessment is a combination of coursework and examination. Coursework 1: Individual assignment [25%]: This will be a written assignment and/or a formal class test at the end of the semester. If a class test is given this will usually be in week 10 and will consist of a combination of a multiple choice test and short theory-based questions. This assignment will measure the student’s achievement of module learning outcomes K1, K2, K3, K4 and P1 and P2. Examination [75%] The examination consists of a 3 hour unseen examination paper in two sections. Section A (practical) has 5 questions and Section B (theory) has 3 questions. Students are required to answer at least 2 questions from Section A, and one question from section B. Students are required to answer one further question from either section. This assignment will measure the student’s achievement of module learning outcomes K2,K3,K4, I2,I3, P1,P2, T1,T3 25 % Coursework 75 % Examination READING LIST Required Drury, C (2005) Management Accounting for Business, 3rd Ed, Thomson Recommended Drury, C (2006) Cost and Management Accounting, 6th Ed., Thomson Weetman, P (2006) Management Accounting FT Prentice Hall Atrill, P & McLaney, E, Management Accounting for Decision-Makers, 4th Ed. FT Prentice Hall Recommended Periodicals / Journals Financial Management, CIMA Student Accountant, ACCA Management Accounting Research CIMA SUMMARY DESCRIPTION Cost classification and ascertainment; materials and labour costing; budgets and budget behaviour; marginal costing for decision-making; cost-volume-profit analysis; accounting for control and performance evaluation.
  50. 50. MODULE TITLE: Managerial Development MODULE CODE: NEW DATE OF REVISION: 2006 MODULE LEVEL: 2 CREDIT POINTS: 20 SEMESTER: 1/2 LOCATION: Magee E_LEARNING: Web dependant PREREQUISITE(S) None CO-REQUISITE(S) None MODULE CO-ORDINATOR(S): Loane; SP; Dr TEACHING STAFF Loane; SP; Dr RESPONSIBLE FOR MODULE H Shiels; Ms DELIVERY Others TBA Lectures 24hrs Seminars 12 hrs Workshops 24hrs Independent study 140hrs (including assessment) TOTAL EFFORT HOURS: 200 ACADEMIC SUBJECT: BMG MODULAR SUBJECT: BMG RATIONALE To provide a focus for the career development of the student, and building an understanding and awareness of the world of work. AIMS The module aims to provide students with an understanding of the issues and challenges facing managers in the workplace today. Students will become equipped to understand established and emerging management practices within the business environment. They will also be prepared to take a more proactive role in their own professional development and to understand key processes in their personal career development in preparation for the world of management.
  51. 51. LEARNING OUTCOMES A successful student will be able to show that he/she can: KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING K1 Identify the nature of goal setting and career choice and to make effective decisions about career development K2 Recognise and explain the various routes through the recruitment and selection process K3 Identify contemporary issues which could have significance for management practice K4 Discuss and debate the factors that are important in a range of contemporary management issues; K5 Understand the strategic importance of information technology within organisations INTELLECTUAL QUALITIES I1 Exercise appropriate judgment in the location, extraction and presentation of information and resources to address their placement selection. I2 Exercise appropriate judgment in the location, extraction and presentation of information and resources to address their future career choices. I3 Be able to acquire, analyze and synthesize materials that assist in the understanding of technology used in business. PROFESSIONAL/PRACTICAL SKILLS P1 Conduct research into personal and professional development issues P2 Conduct research into contemporary issues P3 Apply concepts and models underlying to the real world through class discussions and/or case analysis P4 Perform effectively in a team environment TRANSFERABLE/KEY SKILLS T1 Demonstrate appropriate interpersonal skills for effective performance within a team environment T2 Demonstrate competence in teamwork and interpersonal communications using a variety of media Be aware of and use a variety of resources for personal and professional development Demonstrate personal skills including initiative, independence and effective self-management Be able to reflect upon one’s own learning and professional development and identify strategies to enhance future learning and development
  52. 52. CONTENT Introduction to the course, and personal development and professional development within the workplace, including work based learning and reflection. Career Workshop -, (*Placement tutor /Careers service and others TBA). Self-Assessment: Knowing Yourself Communication skills and resume preparation Assertiveness in the workplace Employment prospects Jobs, and job hunting in the digital age Paths for business graduates Issues for the Accounting profession, HRM profession, Marketing profession, Advertising management professions (Careers service). Contemporary issues for managers Employment in industry: the world economy, prospects, job-search strategies. Entrepreneurship for Business. Working with people - diversity & gender issues, Minority, multicultural and life style problems in the context of the professions Environmental Issues for Managers highlighting inter-alia, strategies for communicating with a generalist audience Ethics in and out of Business ICT and the manager Strategic use of IT for competitive advantage: effective strategies and their Application. Privacy, Security and Ethics: examines areas such as Intellectual property, copyright, fair Use Doctrine, privacy, risk management, ethical issues Emerging Technologies and Trends: examines areas such as increasing portability and mobility of employees and businesses and broadening of e- government * This module will draw on relevant sets of expert input as appropriate, any examples given are indicative, as structures may change over time.
  53. 53. LEARNING AND TEACHING METHODS A lecture programme will introduce students to the topics and issues around personal and professional development, and the requisite skills for future managers The seminar programme and independent study elements will focus on personal development with students doing a considerable amount of independent study individually and in small groups. Various staff including visiting experts will be involved in the delivery of the programme in order to add their expertise to the delivery team and also to introduce their services to the students. In addition students will be supported by a variety of resources within a WebCT Vista environment. This module is web dependant. ASSESSMENT The assessment strategy has three strands; Coursework 1 Personal and Career Plan Development (40%): Completion of a Curriculum Vitae, and a personal development and career plan, based on a skills audit, and opportunities in their chosen field of management. This assignment will contain an element of student reflection. This assignment will measure the student’s achievement of module learning outcomes K1, K2, I1, I2, Coursework 2 Group Analysis of Contemporary Management Issue 30%) In small groups students will be asked to write a 2000 (approximately) word commentary/analysis of a contemporary management issue, this may take one of several formats, for example, a press release, or a report for senior management, etc. The groups will be able to choose from a bank of assignment topics covering topics drawn from weeks 4-9. Students will be asked to peer evaluate 5% of the allocated marks re performance as a group member. This assignment will measure the student’s achievement of module learning outcomes K3, K4, P1,P2, P4 T1 Coursework 3 Individual Class Test (30%) The final element of assessment shall take the form of an individual class test. This will assess a general understanding of material from the syllabus for weeks 10-12. This assignment will measure the student’s achievement of module learning outcomes K5, I3, P3 and T2 100% Coursework (Pass mark will be 50%)
  54. 54. READING LIST* Required WebCT Vista resources for this module – given the nature of this module, it will tend to rely on academic and practitioner readings, to which students will be directed on a topic by topic basis. As many of the topics are stand alone, no single text can be listed as required reading. 1 Haag, S., (2006), Management Information Systems for the Information Age, 5th Edition, McGraw-Hill, ISBN 007-110777-0 Recommended Boone, L.E. and Kurtz, D.L. (2006) Contemporary Business 2006, Thomson South- Western, USA. Marchington, M. and Wilkinson, A. (2005) People Management and Development: Human Resource Management at Work, 3rd Edition, CIPD Enterprises, London. Mc Call, J.J. (2004) Contemporary Issues in Business Ethics, 5th edition, Thompson Learning, Belmont, USA. Groucutt, P. Leadley, P. and Forsyth, P. (2004) Marketing - Essential Principles, New Realities, London: Kogan Page. Trevino, L. K. and Nelson, K. A. (2004). Managing business ethics: Straight talk about how to do it right. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc Cottrell, S. (2003) Skills for Success: The Personal Development Planning Handbook, Palgrave Macmillan, London. Sheehan, K.B. (2003) Controversies in Contemporary Advertising, Sage Publications, London. Cameron, S. (2002) Business Student’s Handbook: learning skills for study and employment, FT/ Prentice Hall, London. Hawkins, P. (1999) The Art of Building Windmills: Career Tactics for the 21st Century, University of Liverpool: GIEU. *The reading list will be reviewed and updated on a regular basis, as appropriate SUMMARY DESCRIPTION The module will provide students with an understanding of the issues and challenges facing managers in the workplace today. Students will become equipped to understand established and emerging management practices within the business environment. They will also be prepared to take a more proactive role in their own professional development and to understand key processes in their personal career development in preparation for the world of management
  55. 55. Level 3 Compulsory Modules
  56. 56. MODULE TITLE: Business Strategy MODULE CODE: BMG 547M1/M2 DATE OF REVISION 2006 MODULE LEVEL: 3 CREDIT POINTS: 20 MODULE STATUS Compulsory SEMESTER: 1/2 LOCATION: Magee E-LEARNING Web supplemented PREREQUISITE(S) CO-REQUISITE(S) MODULE CO-ORDINATOR(S): McCurry, L TEACHING STAFF McLaughlin, H.R RESPONSIBLE FOR MODULE DELIVERY HOURS Lectures 24 hrs Seminars 12 hrs Independent study 164 hrs (including assessment) TOTAL EFFORT HOURS: 200 ACADEMIC SUBJECT: BMG MODULAR SUBJECT: Business and Management RATIONALE The relationship between an organisation and its complex and rapidly changing environment is the key to long-term viability of the organisation. This module is designed to introduce the concept of business strategy. It is concerned with developing appropriate strategies and policies in a variety of industries and is multidisciplinary. The business environment will also be analysed so that strategies are comprehensive. A broad approach will be used, which will fuse the disciplinary underpinnings of Business and Management with the skill of the students within the subject of Business Strategy.
  57. 57. AIMS The aim of the module is to develop students’ ability to analyse the factors which will determine whether a firm excels, survives or fails. Furthermore, on the basis of such analysis, the second aim of this module is to provide students with the tools necessary to prescribe long term strategies which will enable firms to achieve their corporate objectives. LEARNING OUTCOMES A successful student will be able to show that he/she can: Knowledge and Understanding K1 Critically discuss and evaluate strategic management theory K2 Discuss a range of conflicting views on strategic management K3 Discuss the key principles of strategic management K4 Identify how individual disciplines are integrated into overall strategic management Intellectual Qualities I1 Critically evaluate arguments and evidence. I2 Assess the meaning and understanding of the issues rather than focus on content and knowledge I3 Apply the knowledge outlined on the programme to real-life scenarios I4 Ascertain what are the important/key issues that managers face Professional/Practical Skills P1 Apply strategic management theory in a “real world” context. P2 Conduct research into Management and Strategy issues P3 Assess the strategic management of companies. P4 Prescribe/suggest possible remedies for management difficulties Transferable Skills T1 Communicate effectively in writing T2 Demonstrate effective oral communication skills T3 Demonstrate group-work skills-leadership, teamwork, group dynamics T4 Demonstrate organisation skills- time management, task management, objective setting T5 Demonstrate information technology skills- computer literacy and awareness
  58. 58. CONTENT • Understanding Strategy. What is strategy? Competitive Advantage. Measuring Competitive Advantage: Economic Value. The Strategic Management process. • Goals and Objectives Mission Statements. • The External Environment. PESTEL. Porter’s Diamond. Porter’s 5 Forces model. • Strategic capability. The internal environment. RBV of strategy: resources and competencies. VRIO framework. Comparison with competitors regarding efficiency- effectiveness. Value Chain Analysis. Benchmarking. SWOT • Business level strategies. Corporate level strategies. Generic competitive strategies. Vertical integration, diversification, defensive strategies. Strategic alliances, mergers and acquisitions, outsourcing. • Implementing strategy; programmes, budgets, procedures. The role of leadership. Managing strategic change. • International strategies. Operating on an international level. Discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of Strategic alliances, Joint Ventures, Exporting and Franchising as methods of accessing foreign markets • Multi-business strategies: Developing strategies for multi-business organisations and organisations in multiple locations. Portfolio matrices: BCG, Product life-cycle and GE/McKinsey (Directional Policy) Matrices • Corporate Governance and Social Responsibility. Responsibility of Directors, board members. Role of strategic decision makers. Ethical decision making. • Small Business Strategy: the role of strategy in the SME sector. Advantages of Strategy for this sector : • Focused Revision. Reviewing the strategic management process in relation to the module. Effective study tips. Effective examination techniques LEARNING AND TEACHING METHODS Using a variety of methods in teaching and learning, including web-based learning, this module allows students (a) the opportunity to receive important theoretical knowledge of the subject – via lectures and additional reading, (b) the opportunity to apply the theory discussed in lectures through real-life scenarios- via seminars and additional reading (c) the opportunity to conduct some relevant and applied research – via web-based research and additional reading Lectures will Introduce students to the important aspects of strategic management theory. K1, K2, K2, K3, K4, I1, I2, I3, I4 Seminars will be used to provide students with practical application of the theory that has been outlined in lectures I3, I4, P1, P2, P3, P4 Students will be directed to read from the sources provided by the lecturer in week 1 P1, P2, P3, Students will be expected to supplement the provided reading with other sources. The module is web supplemented P1, P2, P3,
  59. 59. ASSESSMENT Coursework 1 Individual (20%): This is an individual assignment, assessing students’ knowledge, comprehension, analysis and application of strategic management theory. This assignment will measure the student’s achievement of module learning outcomes K1,K2,K3,I1,I2,I3,T4,T3 Coursework 2 Group (30%): Group assignment. Students will be given a case study of a well-known company, with accompanying strategic management questions. It is expected that students will incorporate models discussed in lectures in their answers. Students will present their work. Students are also to submit a written report. This assignment requires students to assess the strategy of well-known companies from a number of perspectives. Therefore, it is anticipated that this assignment will call on the knowledge of students from varying disciplines such as HRM, marketing and accounting to apply their understanding of these disciplines and integrate this learning into one cohesive report. This assignment will entail students carrying out research, and presenting their findings from their research in a structured report. This assignment will measure the student’s achievement of module learning outcomes K1,K2,K3,K4,I1,I2,I3,I4,T1,T2,T4,T3,T5,P1 P2,P3, P4 Examination: A 3-hour paper consisting of 8 essay type questions. Students are required to answer 4 questions. There are no compulsory questions. This is a closed book examination. This Examination will measure the student’s achievement of module learning outcomes K1,K2,K3,I1,I2,I3, P1, 50 % Coursework 50 % Examination READING LIST Required • Wheelen, T.L. and Hunger, J. D (2004) Strategic management and business policy : cases.9th ed. - Upper Saddle River, NJ : Pearson Education, (Wheelen) • Johnson, G. et al (2005) Exploring corporate strategy: text and cases. - 7th ed. - Harlow: Financial Times Prentice Hall, (J&S) • McMenamin, J (1999) Financial management: an introduction. London : Routledge, - (McMenamin) • McNamee, P.B (1985) Tools and techniques for strategic management. - Oxford: Pergamon, (McName) • David, F.R (2005) Strategic Management: concepts and cases. 10th ed. Prentice Hall (David) Recommended
  60. 60. • Barney, J.B. & Hesterley, W.S (2006) Strategic Management and Competitive Advantage; concepts and cases. Prenhall. (Barney) • Lynch, R. L (2003) Corporate strategy. - 3rd ed. - Harlow : Financial Times Prentice Hall,– 5 (Lynch) • Thompson, A. A. and Strickland, A.J (2004) Strategic management: concepts and cases. 13th ed. - London : McGraw-Hill/Irwin (T&S) • Jauch, L.R. and Glueck, W.F (1988) Strategic Management and Business Policy, 3rd edition, McGraw Hill College Division, McGraw-Hill. • Mintzberg, H (1989) Mintzberg on Management: Inside Our Strange World of Organizations, Free Press, New York. • Mintzberg, H., Ahlstrand, J. and Lampel, J (1998) Strategy Safari: A Guided Tour through the Wilds of Strategic Management, Simon & Schuster. Electronic Sources Harvard Business Review, Long Range Planning, The Strategic Management Journal, The Economist Academy of Management Journal; Academy of Management Review; Administrative Science Quarterly; British Journal of Management; Business and Society; Business Strategy Review; Business Week; Europe Business Review; Harvard Business Review; Irish Journal of Management; Journal of Business Strategy; Journal of International Business Studies; Journal of Management; The Sunday Times, The Observer, Sunday Business Post, Financial Times ** Reading lists will be updated continually to reflect developments in the business environment. ** Case studies and online resources will also be updated for similar reasons. SUMMARY DESCRIPTION Business Strategy involves bringing together the theory from a number of management disciplines and incorporating this theory into an overall plan for companies. Issues that are discussed in lectures as well as assignments are with the intention of incorporating individual disciplines into a cohesive management plan for the direction of companies.
  61. 61. MODULE TITLE: Entrepreneurship and Innovation MODULE CODE: BMG558 DATE OF REVISION: 2006 MODULE LEVEL: 3 CREDIT POINTS: 20 MODULE STATUS: C SEMESTER: 1/2 LOCATION: Magee E-LEARNING: Web supplemented PREREQUISITE(S): None CO-REQUISITE(S): None MODULE CO-ORDINATOR(S): Mulvenna, DG TEACHING STAFF RESPONSIBLE Mulvenna, DG FOR MODULE DELIVERY: Lectures 12hrs Seminars/Practicals 24hrs Independent study 164hrs (including assessment) TOTAL EFFORT HOURS: 200 ACADEMIC SUBJECT: BMG MODULAR SUBJECT: BMG RATIONALE This module is intended to provide an understanding of the concepts of Entrepreneurship and Innovation and their role in a modern economy. AIMS This module aims to: • develop a thorough understanding of the nature of entrepreneurship and innovation; • examine the changing business environment in which small firms emerge and operate; • give students an appreciation of the practical business of starting and managing a small firm.
  62. 62. LEARNING OUTCOMES A successful student will be able to show that he/she can: KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING K1 appreciate the economic and business context within which innovation and entrepreneurship takes place K2 investigate the nature of entrepreneurship and enterprise culture nationally and internationally K3 examine the key resources for new venture creation K4 recognize the impact of intellectual property rights to innovation and new ventures K5 apply new venture/project planning competencies INTELLECTUAL QUALITIES I1 engage in a critical evaluation of arguments and evidence I2 recognise the central role of creativity and innovation in entrepreneurship I3 utilise judgement in planning, selection and presentation of analyses, information and resources demonstrate creative and innovative thinking PROFESSIONAL/PRACTICAL SKILLS P1 utilise technology, in particular the Internet, to assist in solving business problems P2 communicate effectively using a variety of media and reporting formats P3 display effective interpersonal skills, including listening, negotiating, and team membership P4 conduct research into strategic issues including organisational support for venture development TRANSFERABLE SKILLS T1 present qualitative and quantitative information in a form appropriate for the intended audience T2 work effectively within a team Apply creative and innovative thinking

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