Department for International Development

e-Business Strategy




Management in confidence



02 February 2001
Contents

Glossary

Section

1.        Executive Summary                                                 3


2.        DFI...
Glossary
The following abbreviations and acronyms are used in this document:


           Departmental abbreviations and a...
1   Executive Summary



    Introduction

    This document sets out the e-Business Strategy of the Department for Intern...
Knowledge Management

Knowledge is a key resource for DFID and increasingly one of our products and we need to be more
del...
Local communications infrastructure in DFID overseas locations often present difficulties in obtaining
the necessary relia...
2   DFID’s Objectives and Business Drivers

    DFID’s vision

    DFID’s vision is the reduction and eventual elimination...
•	 building services around citizen’s choices;

•	 making government and its services more accessible and visible;

•	 soc...
•	                Policy and strategy formulation – undertaking research and analysis, the
     development of policy and ...
3   Customer/ Stakeholder/ Partner Segmentation Analysis

    Introduction

    This Section of the Strategy identifies th...
Internal Staff and Departments

Definition           Includes all the departments that were represented at the workshop in...
Overseas Citizens

Definition          Citizens of developing countries
Interaction types   DFID’s direct interaction with...
Suppliers and contractors

Definition           Organisations and individuals involved in providing consultancy, project
 ...
Other Government departments (OGDs) and Parliament

 Definition                Other UK Government departments and Parliam...
4   Options Analysis

    Introduction

    This Section of the Strategy identifies the options for using e-Business appli...
The next step is to understand the ability of the various categories of e-Business application, outlined
      above, to f...
Implications for DFID’s e-Business strategy

The analysis above suggests that DFID’s e-Business strategy should cover the ...
CURRENT E-BUSINESS PROJECTS

 Information and                  CRM                              e-Procurement             ...
Future options

The additional projects outlined in the table below were identified in consultation with staff from a
rang...
•     the ease of implementation.

The first of these criteria considers all the issues outlined above i.e. the Type of In...
Possible Future Projects                        Contribution made to         Ease of
                                     ...
•	   actively discussing usage with other departments and organisations outside DFID;

•	   revisiting this Strategy to al...
5   Partnership and Funding Options
    At this stage in the development of DFID’s e-Business strategy, only very limited ...
6   Programme Planning


    The table below summarises the e-Business applications which DFID is currently implementing o...
Project:                                     Live       2001   2002   2003   2004

Electronic Library                     ...
7   Cross Cutting Issues

    Introduction

    DFID has undertaken an analysis of how cost cutting issues can be dealt wi...
agencies at European or global level (albeit that the level of information which can be disclosed will
vary from case to c...
8   Risk Assessment

    Risks to e-Business

    The potential risks to DFID of implementing e-Business applications are ...
Strategic:

R.        Lack of benefits or only short-term benefits;

S.        Inability for outsiders to interact efficie...
9   Next Steps
    This strategy lays out the path by which DFID will achieve the transformation to e-Business. As
    dem...
•	 Extend the Key Words project to develop a common taxonomy for the classification of knowledge
   resources to be used a...
Appendices



I     Intensity of Interaction by Customer/ Stakeholder/ Partner Groups

II    Examples of e-Business Applic...
Appendix I – Intensity of Interaction by Customer/Stakeholder/Partner Group




                                          ...
Page 33   DFID e-Business Strategy
Appendix II – Examples of e-Business Applications

           Information and Knowledge Management:

           The benefi...
Customer Relationship Management (CRM):

           Customer Relationship Management use electronic solutions to provide a...
•	 Electronic Payslips – Technology can be used to monitor staff hours and legislation has recently been passed to allow e...
Appendix III – DFID’s Existing e-Business Projects

Information and knowledge management

          1    Electronic Librar...
5   Web content management tools:

          The Department will be implementing a software solution to manage intranet an...
10 Knowledge Network project:

          DFID plans to integrate with the government wide Knowledge Network. The Departmen...
e-Procurement

          1   UK procurement card pilot:

          Procurement Dept are co-ordinating the pilot of UK proc...
Department: Finance   Timescale: Live


          5   Web based forecasting and expenditure tools:

          Allows forec...
Department:     ISSD   Timescale: Live


          2      Video conferencing facilities:

          Video conferencing is ...
e-Operational Management

          1      Prism

          Performance Reporting Information System for Management (PRISM...
Appendix IV – Potential Future e-Business Projects

          Information and knowledge management


          1          ...
2             Provide, on internet, more facilitated e-Forums to enhance specific communities:

          DFID believes th...
e-Procurement

          1              Extend CMIS e-Tendering functionality:

          DFID issue and assess thousands ...
e-Communications

          1             Workflow applications e.g. travel, expenses, job applications etc:

          El...
Appendix V – Risk Analysis

      Risk:                                                                               Impa...
Risk:                                                                         Impact:        Likelihood:    Mitigation:
  ...
DFID e-Business Strategy: 2001
DFID e-Business Strategy: 2001
DFID e-Business Strategy: 2001
DFID e-Business Strategy: 2001
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Transcript of "DFID e-Business Strategy: 2001"

  1. 1. Department for International Development e-Business Strategy Management in confidence 02 February 2001
  2. 2. Contents Glossary Section 1. Executive Summary 3 2. DFID’s Objectives and Business Drivers 6 3. Customer/Stakeholder/Partner Segmentation Analysis 9 4. Options Analysis 13 5. Partnership and Funding Options 20 6. Programme Planning 21 7. Cross Cutting Issues 23 8. Risk Assessment 25 9. Next Steps 27 Appendix I Intensity of Interaction by Customer/Stakeholder/Partner Group 30 II Examples of e-Business Applications 32 III DFID’s Existing e-Business Projects 35 IV Potential Future e-Business Projects 42 V Risk Analysis 46 V1 Overseas Pensions Department 50
  3. 3. Glossary The following abbreviations and acronyms are used in this document: Departmental abbreviations and acronyms AD Accounts Department APD Aid Policy Department DFID Department for International Development Eval Evaluation Department Fin Dept Finance Department HRD Human Resource Division IMC Information Management Committee KPU Knowledge Policy Unit Inf Dept Information Department ISSD Information Systems & Services Department OPD Overseas Pensions Department PO Private Office Proc Dept Procurement Department SDD Social Development Department Stats Dept Statistics Department TMG Top Management Group Other abbreviations and acronyms CRM Customer Relationship Management EDM Electronic Document Management ERM Electronic Records Management PRISM Performance Reporting and Information System for Management MIS Management Information System CMIS Contracts Management Information System VPN Virtual Private Network PEP Public Enquiry Point
  4. 4. 1 Executive Summary Introduction This document sets out the e-Business Strategy of the Department for International Development (DFID). It has been created in order to define an overall context for the implementation of e-Business processes and technology in DFID as part of the implementation of the e-Government strategy within the Modernising Government agenda. This strategy draws from a number of existing strategy documents including DFIDs public service agreement, service delivery agreement, strategic information framework and IS architecture values statement. DFID’s objectives DFID’s vision is the reduction and eventual elimination of poverty in poorer countries. It seeks to achieve this through the promotion of sustainable development through co-ordinated UK and international action . DFID does not undertake high volume transactions with UK citizens so there is little opportunity for on-line service provision to citizens. However, DFID has identified considerable scope to use e- Business to deliver its objectives more efficiently and effectively and it is committed to utilising new technology to achieve this. DFID sees e-Business as a major enabler, not just of its support services but of its core business of creating and implementing international development policy. e-Business Opportunities In order to examine the potential for e-Business, DFID has identified types of interaction which it carries out with various customers, stakeholders and partners. A number of categories of e-Business applications have been identified in order to determine how the interactions can be supported by new technology: The analysis demonstrates that the applications which can achieve the greatest benefit in terms of DFID’s ability to achieve its objectives are: • Knowledge Management • Electronic Communications This is in line with the vision of DFID as a knowledge management organisation whose key business process is the building, managing and sharing of intellectual property to meet its business needs.
  5. 5. Knowledge Management Knowledge is a key resource for DFID and increasingly one of our products and we need to be more deliberate in the way that it is managed. We recognise that “cultural” issues (the incentives for individuals and teams to share knowledge) are fundamental to this, and that they will need to be supported by detailed working practices and by appropriate use of e-Business technology. Information overload is a real problem which must be addressed. Sharing information with large numbers of people is easy and the risk is that making information easy to share means that there is too much data available that no one has time to absorb and convert to knowledge. This might have the perverse effect of less use being made of available knowledge than before the e-applications were in place. Introduction of knowledge management e-business applications in DFID must therefore be very carefully targeted and managed with careful analysis of context and risks. DFID is considering whether to establish a small temporary Knowledge Management team to identify good KM practice both within DFID and other institutions, commission supporting collaborative e-Business applications and advocate good practice within DFID and with partners. A number of knowledge management e-Business projects are already underway or being planned including; • the development of second generation intranet and internet sites focused on maintaining relevant and up to date content structured around well researched information needs of users. • the development of web-enabled electronic document and record management systems; • deployment of collaborative groupware technology for information exchange and calendar sharing and scheduling • identification of common key words for use in classifying and searching DFID knowledge repositories • project performance reporting systems enabling lesson learning and knowledge sharing across the DFID project portfolio by all staff and potentially with partners and the public. In addition this strategy has identified a number of possible future projects such as the introduction of profiling and personalisation software tools to enable better targeting of information and the development of extranet communities and facilitated e-forums to enhance collaboration with partners. DFID is also involved in international initiatives to develop standards for electronic exchange of project and activity information in order to improve aid co-ordination and effectiveness. The international development markup language (IDML) is an example of the application of eXtensible Markup Language (XML) and DFID will be looking to maximise its potential in future e-Business application developments. Electronic Communications DFID is a dispersed department with over 50 offices based overseas. In order to work effectively it must have a fast, reliable world-wide IT infrastructure to enable effective knowledge exchange both within the department and with other stakeholders and partners.
  6. 6. Local communications infrastructure in DFID overseas locations often present difficulties in obtaining the necessary reliability and speed. A high priority for DFID is therefore to further develop its international e-communications capacity. A key means of DFID achieving this is through partnership with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in use of the satellite based FCO Telecommunication Network. This will allow the extension of video conferencing to major overseas offices and the provision of secure high band-width communications giving access to corporate e- business and knowledge systems in addition to the current e-mail and telephone network. This strategy also identifies other potential future e-communications projects such as extending virtual private networking to allow global mobile connectivity and the use of on-line collaborative tools for virtual conferencing, presentations etc. Other Opportunities for e-business DFID is also undertaking a wide range of supporting e-Business projects which directly support the Strategy set out in this document. These include e-enabled human resources and finance systems and the development of e-procurement and e-tendering business applications. Additionally, a range of other opportunities have been identified to use emerging technology to assist DFID in achieving its objectives. These have been listed in this Strategy and prioritised in terms of impact and ease of implementation. Management of this Strategy This Strategy also sets out: • a summary of partnership and funding options; • a summary programme plan for the period 2000 to 2005; • a process for dealing with cross cutting issues; • a risk assessment; Next Steps This strategy will be revisited and revised over time. The next planned revision of the strategy is April 2001. DFID intends to use its Information Management Committee (IMC), chaired by our Information Age Government Champion to oversee the development of the strategy and steer the prioritisation and implementation of identified projects. This Committee will be business led to ensure that the e- Business Strategy remains a key enabler of DFID’s objectives. It will report at least annually to the Management Board, which is chaired by the Permanent Secretary.
  7. 7. 2 DFID’s Objectives and Business Drivers DFID’s vision DFID’s vision is the reduction and eventual elimination of poverty in poorer countries, as measured by achievement of the International Development Targets (IDTs). DFID aims to achieve this through the promotion of sustainable development and in particular by: • building development partnerships with poorer and transition countries; • working more closely with the private and voluntary sectors, and the research community; • working with and influencing multilateral development organisations; • promoting consistent policies affecting poorer countries; • using knowledge and resources effectively and efficiently. These objectives have been defined in more detail in DFID’s Public Service Agreement and Service Delivery Agreement. The Department has a strong sense of purpose in its vision of sustainable development, articulated in the 1997 White Paper (soon to be reinforced by the Government’ s White Paper on Globalisation and Poverty) and other internal strategy documents. DFID’s approach is to influence its partners through a collaborative approach. This document is DFID’s strategy for using e-Business to achieve these objectives more effectively and efficiently. It should be seen as a subsidiary document to the Department’s overall strategic framework consisting of: • the White Papers; • the Public Service Agreement; • the Service Delivery Agreement. • the Departmental Medium Term Framework. This e-Business Strategy is one of the key mechanisms for giving effect to the objectives contained in these documents. It is complementary with: • the Strategic Framework for Information Management; • the IT Architectural Values Statement; Modernising Government The e-Government Strategy which is owned by the e-Envoy is a part of the Modernising Government Initiative. It sets out the Government’s strategic intent of utilising the principles of e-Business to improve government’s dealings with citizens, businesses, suppliers and other organisations. The key objectives of the strategy are:
  8. 8. • building services around citizen’s choices; • making government and its services more accessible and visible; • social inclusion; • using information better. DFID is committed to the continuing development of a modern and effective service in accordance with the principles of the Modernising Government agenda. It has therefore considered carefully how the principles of e-Business will apply in the context of DFID, which is a department which delivers only limited services directly to UK citizens. DFID recognises the opportunities which exist to deliver its objectives more effectively and to contribute to the delivery of cross-cutting objectives by utilising new information and communications technology. The analysis of how e-Business will apply is set out in the rest of this Strategy. Principles of the e-Business Strategy DFID has for some time been developing an ability to operate electronically in order to deliver its objectives more effectively – this process has been directed by the Information Management Committee (IMC). This Strategy represents the next stage of that process and a first attempt at creating an overall framework for the development of e-Business within the Department. The contents of this document are not intended to be seen as stand alone but should be seen alongside the various initiatives already included in the IMC programme. It is intended that this strategy will develop over time and will be regularly revisited as priorities become clearer and detail is fleshed out. The development of e-Business in DFID is underpinned by the following guiding principles: • DFID must provide an appropriate choice of access channels for citizens, businesses, contractors and other development organisations to interact with it; • DFID will use e-Business processes and technology to manage its business in an efficient and effective way; • UK citizens must have access to relevant and timely information about DFID’s activities and the development programmes which it is undertaking; • DFID will use technology to enable effective cross-boundary working to ensure the development of relevant cross-cutting policy initiatives. Types of Interaction In order to inform the development of this e-Business Strategy, DFID has conducted a conceptual analysis of its interactions with its customers, stakeholders and partners. This has led to the definition of six “Types of Interaction” - these are broad groupings which have similar characteristics and have been defined for the purposes of examining e-Business opportunities and segmenting customers/ stakeholders/ partners. The Types of Interaction which have been defined are:
  9. 9. • Policy and strategy formulation – undertaking research and analysis, the development of policy and strategy options and agreement of DFID’s detailed development policy priorities for regional and international issues. • Policy consensus – the process of discussing policy initiatives, influencing and persuading other parties to adopt consistent courses of action around agreed common objectives. • Resource allocation – the allocation of funding and other scarce resources across the policy priorities which have been agreed. • Programme management – the management of programmes to deliver DFID’s priorities whether directly or through third parties, including evaluation and monitoring. • Managing DFID’s own organisation – conducting all of the internal processes which are necessary for the organisation to run effectively including, for example, record and document management, payroll, HR, IS support and staff appraisal and development. • Demonstrating accountability – the processes involved in being accountable to the public, Parliament, Civil Society and central governmental structures. Within each Type of Interaction, there are interactions with a range of customers/ stakeholders/ partners. These are examined in the next Section of this Strategy.
  10. 10. 3 Customer/ Stakeholder/ Partner Segmentation Analysis Introduction This Section of the Strategy identifies the key groups of customers, stakeholders and partners with whom DFID needs to interact in order to achieve its organisational objectives. It then identifies which of the six Types of Interaction set out in the previous Section are the key interactions for each group of customers, stakeholders and partners. This exercise is required because it helps to identify which of the six Types of Interaction DFID should focus on in order to achieve the most impact from implementing new e-Business methods of interaction. The groupings of customers, stakeholders and partners have been identified only as a tool for this analysis. This is not intended to suggest that any of these Types of Interaction are more important than the others. Each is a crucial component of DFID’s business. However, through understanding the organisation’s relative involvement in each Type, an assessment can be made of where an incremental change in new ways of interaction will impact most upon efficiency and effectiveness for the organisation as a whole. The next Section examines how e-Business applications could be utilised to achieve these improvements. The customer/ stakeholder/ partner segmentation analysis also helps to identify the preferred service delivery channels for each group of customers, stakeholders and partners. This will contribute to understanding the types of e-Business application which can be used. Analysis The analysis of DFID’s various customer/ stakeholder/ partner groups was conducted in workshops and interviews involving key business managers. Representatives from a full range of DFID's departments were involved. Participants identified a wide range of partners with whom DFID interacts when carrying out its business. For the purposes of analysis these have been categorised into seven groups: • internal staff and departments; • UK citizens; • overseas citizens; • governments in developing countries; • suppliers and contractors; • other international development organisations; • other government departments and Parliament. All groups have some level of interaction with each of the six defined Types of Interaction. However the key ones in each case are described in the tables below. The extent to which each group is involved in each Type of Interaction is set out in a summary table shown at Appendix I.
  11. 11. Internal Staff and Departments Definition Includes all the departments that were represented at the workshop including e.g. Aid Policy, procurement, evaluation, statistics, pensions, HR etc. Interaction types As expected staff and departments interact with each other across the full range of DFID's interaction types including interactions required to support the management of the organisation e.g. HR, procurement etc. � policy and strategy � resource allocation � programme management � policy consensus � management of organisation � demonstrating accountability Channel analysis Most UK based staff have access to the full range of access channels – face to face, internet, intranet, video conferencing, telephone, fax, e-Mail, internal post. Delivery channels for staff based abroad have significantly improved in recent years. Increasingly therefore staff based abroad also have access to the full range of access channel. However in some areas infrastructure limitations can result in inability to access some channels. UK Citizens Definition UK citizens Interaction types Interactions with the UK citizen occur through a number of media. These include the Development Policy Forum, Development Awareness Working Groups, the Website, “Development” Magazine, Exhibitions and Conferences, Development Education Programmes and Public Enquiry Point. Many of these interactions are generated by citizens with a specific academic or personal interest in ID. Additionally, for the purposes of accountability and democracy and in order to comply with data protection legislation, UK citizens can interact with DFID in relation to a number of issues. Policy and strategy � resource allocation programme management � policy consensus management of organisation � demonstrating accountability Channel analysis It is increasingly possible to interact with UK citizens using the internet although traditional postal services and the telephone are currently the most prevalent channels of interaction.
  12. 12. Overseas Citizens Definition Citizens of developing countries Interaction types DFID’s direct interaction with citizens in developing countries is focused on consultation at a micro level i.e. how could resources be most effectively utilised on a particular programme? policy and strategy resource allocation � programme management policy consensus management of organisation demonstrating accountability Channel analysis Channels of communication with overseas citizens in developing countries are extremely limited. At this time large scale electronic interaction is not possible. In conjunction with the World Bank DFID is looking at a wide range of ICT possibilities to help in particular with education and empowerment. The establishment of more in-country offices is a step to forge stronger face to face interaction and partnerships. Governments in developing countries Definition Governmental administrations/government departments in developing countries. Interaction types The focus of interaction with this group is primarily to influence policy to achieve DFID's ID objectives and to carry out need assessment in consultation with overseas governments to inform policy formulation. � policy and strategy resource allocation programme management � policy consensus management of organisation demonstrating accountability Channel Analysis Channels of communication with overseas governments in developing countries are limited, but developing. Central administrations may have web access but this may not be the case for local administrations. DFID is increasingly establishing in-country offices to allow closer working relationships. Local offices will utilise staff appointed in-country extensively and they will have access to the central knowledge base and corporate systems.
  13. 13. Suppliers and contractors Definition Organisations and individuals involved in providing consultancy, project management, project delivery, supplies etc. This includes private sector firms, Crown Agents, Universities and other bodies carrying out projects on a contract basis, etc Interaction types Suppliers are primarily be focussed on interactions relating to the supply of services and obtaining payment from DFID to deliver those services i.e. programme management interactions. In carrying out these tasks suppliers are involved in gathering information which feeds into the other types of interaction. � policy and strategy � resource allocation � programme management � policy consensus management of organisation � demonstrating accountability Channel Analysis It is broadly assumed that most suppliers will have access to a full range of access channels but organisations based overseas may have technical infrastructure difficulties. It is also accepted that the level of access to technology will vary considerably by organisation. Other organisations with international development objectives Definition Organisations which are also involved in international development. These include universities, research institutions, Civil Society, the World Bank, the UN, the EU etc. For the purposes of this analysis this group also includes Governments which are not in developing countries. Interaction types The key focus of interactions with these organisations is at a strategic and consensus building level. Interactions are concentrated on ensuring effective cross organisational working to achieve similar ID objectives. � policy formulation � resource allocation programme management � policy consensus management of organisation demonstrating accountability Channel Analysis It assumed that most organisations will have access to a full range of service delivery channels but organisations based overseas may have technical infrastructure difficulties.
  14. 14. Other Government departments (OGDs) and Parliament Definition Other UK Government departments and Parliament Interaction types DFID consult with OGDs on a variety of policy issues. The key focus of interaction with Parliament and the Treasury is to demonstrate accountability and effective and efficient utilisation of delegated funds. � policy formulation resource allocation programme management � policy consensus management of organisation � demonstrating accountability Channel Analysis Most organisations will have access to a full range of service delivery channels and the GSI. Prioritisation The table at Appendix I summarises the key findings of the prioritisation analysis. For each customer/ stakeholder/ partner group, an assessment has been made of the complexity, intensity and spread of interactions in relation to each of the six Types of Interaction. The objective of this analysis is to understand where improvements to interactions are likely to yield the most benefits in terms of contributing to the achievement of DFID’s objectives. The analysis shows that the highest intensity and greatest spread of interaction is in relation to policy formulation. Resource allocation and programme management involve the next greatest levels followed by the process of achieving policy consensus. Demonstrating accountability involves relatively less intense, complex and widespread interaction. It should be noted that this analysis has been carried out at a very high level. The analysis only considers relative differences in the levels of interaction. To obtain a full understanding of different interaction levels a more detailed study would be required. The analysis also shows that virtually all the key customer/ stakeholder/ partner groups have access to most of the key channels of service delivery. Exceptions include organisations and individuals based in developing countries where access to a variety of service delivery channels is limited. Section 8, Risk Analysis, outlines how this issue is being addressed. Nevertheless when considering the options for e-Business applications abroad this issue will need to be considered.
  15. 15. 4 Options Analysis Introduction This Section of the Strategy identifies the options for using e-Business applications to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the Types of Interaction (as identified in Section 2) with the groups of customers/ stakeholders/ partners (as identified in Section 3). e-Business applications There is a wide range of e-Business applications an organisation could use to facilitate the various interactions in which it is involved. For the purposes of this analysis these have been analysed in the following categories: • information and knowledge management, including Electronic Records Management (ERM) and Electronic Document Management (EDM) and collaborative technologies • customer relationship management (CRM); • e-Procurement; • e-Finance; • e-HR; • e-Communications; • e-Operational management Full definitions of each category, including examples, can be found at Appendix II. The contribution that e-Business could make to DFID In order to understand the contribution that the applications outlined above can make to DFID's business two inter-dependent factors must be examined. These are: • the Types of Interaction that impact most upon DFID's business; • the extent to which those interactions can be facilitated by an e-Business application. The first of these factors has already been assessed in Section 3 where the Types of Interaction which are most intensive and widespread in terms of their impact on DFID's business were identified. Listed in priority order these were: 1 Policy and strategy formulation 2 Policy consensus 3 Resource allocation 4 Programme management 5 Management of the organisation 6 Demonstrating accountability
  16. 16. The next step is to understand the ability of the various categories of e-Business application, outlined above, to facilitate any improvement in these different Types of Interaction. The matrix below displays an analysis which addresses this issue. Categories of eBusiness application Information and CRM e-Procurement e-Finance e- C o m m s e-HR e- O p e r t a t i o n a l Types of knowledge Management interaction management Policy and strategy formulation Policy consensus Resource allocation Programme management Management of the organisation Demonstrating accountability v.high level of high level of medium level of low level of relevance relevance relevance relevance The analysis shows that each category of e-Business application is relevant in some way to the work DFID does. However the two applications which are most relevant to DFID's strategic needs are: • Information and knowledge management; • e-Communications. These applications are consistently relevant across all the different Types of Interaction. They are also particularly relevant to the Types of Interaction given a high priority in the previous Section i.e. policy formulation; resource allocation and programme management. It is therefore clear that these applications will have the highest impact on DFID's business and should be prioritised accordingly.
  17. 17. Implications for DFID’s e-Business strategy The analysis above suggests that DFID’s e-Business strategy should cover the full range of its operations but the biggest benefits can be obtained by continuing to build the organisation’s capacity to communicate and to build, manage and share knowledge within and beyond its functional boundaries. This conclusion fits well with the view that DFID has for some time been changing into a knowledge management organisation. Sharing knowledge is a key driver of international development - it is the fundamental building block of DFID’s ability to create the conditions for development in poor countries. The ability to collaborate effectively to create and share intellectual capital will be a key driver of its success in the future. A significant number of the e-Business applications which DFID implements must support this role. It should be noted that introducing the technology to support knowledge management is only part of what is needed. Business processes will need to change so that sharing knowledge becomes part of every day working practices. Most of all, culture must change so that knowledge sharing becomes a core part of the behaviours exhibited by all staff. A key part of this will be managing “information overload” so that staff see value from sharing knowledge and from the technology which supports it. Existing e-Business Projects DFID is already implementing a range of e-Business projects which have been designed to use new technology to enable more efficient communications and business processes. The table below lists these projects within the e-Business categories outlined above. Full descriptions of each project are shown at Appendix III.
  18. 18. CURRENT E-BUSINESS PROJECTS Information and CRM e-Procurement e-Finance knowledge management 1. Public Enquiry point 1. UK procurement card 1. BACS transfer of 1. Electronic Library project pilot funds 2. Electronic record and 2. Information Asset 2. Contracts 2. Resource allocation document Register management and monitoring management – EDM and information system 3. Direct access points 3. Overseas CODA ERM (CMIS) on internet site 4. UK CODA 3. Electronic news feeds 4. Help desk support 5. Web based 4. Key words project systems forecasting and 5. Web content expenditure tools management tools 6. Electronic asset 6. Groupware software register 7. Various discussion forums on web site 8. Information needs analysis project 9. Best practice programme 10. Knowledge Network project e-HR e-Communications e-Operational Management 1. Unified electronic HR and payroll 1. E-mail system 2. Video conferencing facilities 1. Performance Reporting 2. Rationalisation of staff Information System for 3. Internet site and intranet site directories Management redesign 2. Contract Management 4. GSI implementation Information System 5. Virtual Private network 3. Web based forecasting and implementation expenditure tools 6. 100% internal staff access to 4. Redevelopment of management the internet Information System and Coding 7. Remote working pilots 8. voice mail This table shows that DFID is carrying out or planning projects in all the key categories of e-Business application. There is an emphasis upon knowledge management and e-Communications projects. DFID is therefore already addressing its key strategic e-Business needs. There are however a range of other projects which have been suggested by staff which may enhance, complement or succeed these projects. These future options are outlined below.
  19. 19. Future options The additional projects outlined in the table below were identified in consultation with staff from a range of DFID's departments. The ideas generated have also been listed in the key e-Business headings. POSSIBLE FUTURE PROJECTS Information and CRM e-Procurement e-Finance knowledge 1. Further develop the 1. Extend CMIS e- 1. Receipt of electronic management external website Tendering functionality invoices 1. Develop a common 2. Develop Information 2. Digital authentication taxonomy for storing Asset Register project knowledge 2. Set up Intranet and Extranet communities on key subject areas 3. Develop EDM/ERM – corporate policy and electronic inventory of records 4. Staff yellow pages 5. Provide more facilitated e-Forums to enhance specific communities 6. Online conferences and presentations 7. Desktop video conferences 8. Development of multi­ media library 9. Personalisation of intranet e-HR e-Communications e-Operations Management 1. e-Learning environment 1. Workflow applications e.g. travel, expenses, job applications 2. e-Payslips etc 3. e-Performance appraisals and 2. Remote working packages competency models 3. Push technologies 4. Virtual Private Networks 5. PDA roll out Prioritising future options Clearly DFID cannot consider investing in all these options at the same time. It therefore important to prioritise these options according to both: • the contribution that they make to achieving DFID's objectives;
  20. 20. • the ease of implementation. The first of these criteria considers all the issues outlined above i.e. the Type of Interaction which the application facilitates and the importance of that application to DFID's business. The second criterion considers the ease with which the application can implemented and therefore with which the benefits can be realised. A number of factors contribute to the ease of implementing an application including: • costs and resources required; • timescales to deliver; • risks involved. The availability of commercial off the shelf software often makes a project easier to implement because the costs, timescales and risks are all limited compared to a bespoke system design. The table below summarises the prioritisation of the applications identified against these two criteria: Possible Future Projects Contribution made to Ease of achieving DFID's implementation objectives. High Medium Low Easy Medium Difficult Develop a common taxonomy for storing High Easy knowledge Set up Intranet and Extranet communities on key High Medium subject areas. Develop EDM/ERM – corporate policy and High Medium electronic inventory of records Staff yellow pages Medium Easy Provide, on internet, more facilitated e-Forums Medium Easy to enhance specific communities Online conferences and presentations High Difficult Desktop video conferences Medium Medium Development of multi-media library Low Easy Personalisation of intranet Low Difficult Further develop the external website Medium Medium Develop Information Asset Register Medium Easy Extend CMIS e-Tendering functionality Medium Medium Digital authentication project High Difficult Receipt of electronic invoices Medium Medium e-Learning environment Medium Difficult e-Payslips Low Difficult e-Performance appraisals and competency Medium Medium
  21. 21. Possible Future Projects Contribution made to Ease of achieving DFID's implementation objectives. models Workflow applications e.g. travel, expenses, High Difficult job applications etc Remote working packages Medium Medium Push technologies Low Easy Virtual Private Networks Low Medium PDA roll out Medium Medium The analysis shows at a simple level which are the applications which should be prioritised and deals only with new projects. This analysis will be combined with the project prioritisation in the Strategic Framework for Information Management to compare the priorities of possible future projects with those already committed. Before commitments are made to any further projects, all proposals will be fed into DFID’s standard investment cost benefit analysis methodology to ensure that the business case for any project is robust and that the costs and risks have been considered in full. Projects to develop e-Business working will have to demonstrate their value along side other projects, in order to secure scarce resources. Take-up and customer satisfaction DFID will monitor levels of take-up and customer satisfaction with its e-Business applications. Many of the more formalised mechanisms for measuring e-Business take-up are concerned only with monitoring levels of take-up by citizens of electronic transactions and e-Commerce – this will not be relevant to DFID so other mechanisms are required. DFID is already undertaking a process of user consultation in relation to the redesign of its external website by asking site visitors to give structured comments and suggest enhancements and changes to the site. Customer satisfaction monitoring will include: • monitoring usage of sites on the internet, extranets and intranet – including recording hits and tracking access to content and discussion functionality; • seeking on-line user feedback and comment; • conducting occasional more detailed feedback by e-Mail, telephone or other format (depending upon who is involved); • regularly seeking input from across DFID’s own functions to determine usefulness and usage levels; • post implementation reviews; • feedback at quarterly IMC meetings;
  22. 22. • actively discussing usage with other departments and organisations outside DFID; • revisiting this Strategy to allow for updating in the light of user comments and emerging new technologies.
  23. 23. 5 Partnership and Funding Options At this stage in the development of DFID’s e-Business strategy, only very limited consideration has been given to the partnership and funding options which might be available to support parts of the programme. Costs of the opportunities set out in the previous Sections have not yet been analysed in detail. They are, however, likely to be significant over a period of time. Partnership options such as PFI or PPP or other contractual arrangements are unlikely to be options both for funding capital investment and for the operation, maintenance and up-grading of systems, infrastructure and applications due to the relatively small size and highly dispersed nature of DFID’s operations. Other partnerships however may involve other UK government bodies, overseas government bodies, other development organisations and the voluntary sector. DFID has experience in partnership working in that much of the development programme is carried out in partnership with other government and other bodies. Additionally, there are some instance of working with other bodies on technology projects, for example: • arrangements to use the Foreign and Commonwealth Office’s global communications system to host video conferencing; • joint hosting of websites for example, Rural Livelihoods Connect. It is likely that options for partnership will be attractive for the e-Business strategy for the following reasons; • partnership provides opportunities for sharing the capital investment costs with other organisations; • risks can also be shared across organisations and ideally placed with those best able to manage them; • economies of scale may be possible by coming together to share systems with other organisations with similar functional requirements; • shared services type options allow the separation of systems delivery from the core business of DFID and other organisations. This could promote higher levels of service and customer responsiveness; • partnership control of knowledge management systems has a particular advantage in that it allows a number of the key parties who will build and use the knowledge to have joint responsibility for its management. This will encourage the development of systems which will meet the needs of all parties involved and also reduce the likelihood of the development of separate and uncoordinated (and even competing) knowledge management initiatives. These ideas will be taken forward as the programme of e-Business applications is developed over the coming months.
  24. 24. 6 Programme Planning The table below summarises the e-Business applications which DFID is currently implementing or planning and shows target endpoint for each implementation project.
  25. 25. Project: Live 2001 2002 2003 2004 Electronic Library On-going Electronic data management - EDM and ERM Electronic news feeds Key words project Web content management tools Groupware software Discussion forums on website On-going Information needs analysis projects Best practice programme On-going Knowledge network project Public Enquiry Point (PEP) To be agreed Information Asset Register On-going Direct access points on internet site Help desk support systems UK procurement card pilot Contract Management Information System BACS transfer of funds Resource allocation and monitoring Overseas CODA UK CODA Electronic asset register Web based forecasting and expenditure Unified HR and payroll system e-Mail Video conferencing facilities Internet site and intranet redesign GSI implementation Virtual Private Network implementation 100% internal staff access to the internet Remote working pilot PRISM
  26. 26. 7 Cross Cutting Issues Introduction DFID has undertaken an analysis of how cost cutting issues can be dealt with as part of its e- Business strategy. This has categorised cross-cutting issues into 3 types: Type Examples Cross cutting initiatives • Knowledge sharing between DFID and FCO between DFID and one or • Joint policy making with FCO or other relevant more other departments departments • Joint targets with HM Treasury on relief of unsustainable debt • Joint targets with Foreign and Commonwealth Office and Ministry of Defence on conflict prevention and management • Building International Development into the school curriculum through the National Grid for Learning, working with the Department for Education and Employment Cross cutting initiatives • Public access to departmental plan and performance which are common to DFID information and most or all other • Managing ministerial correspondence which covers departments issues which cross departmental boundaries • Reporting information to central structures in Cabinet Office or Treasury • the Knowledge Network • Information Asset Register Cross cutting issues relating • Change of details for pensioners to life events experienced by citizens The final type of cross-cutting event, those relating to life events, will be limited in its impact on DFID to those relating to ex-colonial civil servant pensioners. This is because the nature of much of DFID’s work means there is little chance that it will from part of a life event contact with UK citizens. The key cross cutting issues for DFID are discussed below. Knowledge management, collaborative working and e-Communications DFID needs to work with other government departments to ensure that it is developing consistent policies. Sharing knowledge also maximises the benefit which can be obtained from the costs of collecting it. DFID sees this need as essentially similar to the need to work closely with other
  27. 27. agencies at European or global level (albeit that the level of information which can be disclosed will vary from case to case). Therefore, the solutions for managing issues which are cross cutting with other UK government departments are essentially the same as those for managing issues which are cross cutting with other governments and international organisations – knowledge management, collaborative technologies and e-Communications (as set out in Section 4). Other government departments will form (and already do form) key members of the communities which are used to develop policy and build consensus. Discussions with these organisations will form a key part of the planning process for the development of these applications as they proceed. The Global Gateway, an international portal for International Development information promoted by the World bank, may become an important means of dealing with issues which are cross cutting with other governments and the International Development Community. Complex issues on ownership, editorial control, contributions and funding have still to be resolved. We are keeping its progress under close scrutiny. DFID intends to play its role in the development of government-wide initiatives such as the use of the GSI, the Knowledge Network and UK OnLine.
  28. 28. 8 Risk Assessment Risks to e-Business The potential risks to DFID of implementing e-Business applications are listed below – more detailed descriptions can be found in Appendix V. The impact of these risks range has been classified as minor, concerning or serious, with the likelihood of occurrence if action is not taken ranked as low medium or high. Mitigation to reduce these risks are also outlined in Appendix V. External: A. DFID’s interactions break legislation; Operational: B. Lack of skills to implement the e-Business strategy; C. Low take-up of new e-Business applications from outside DFID; D. Lack of e-Business, damages DFID’s credibility as an employer; E. Too much information is available; Empowerment: F. People without access to e-Business channels are excluded; G. There is no empowerment and leadership in the change to e-Business; Integrity & Content: H. Bad publicity arriving from media misunderstanding; I. Inaccurate information; J. Information may be dispersed across competitive knowledge networks; K. Irrelevance of website content; IT Processing: L. Incompatibility of applications; M. Hosting and technology problems; N. Insufficient data security; O. A catastrophic loss; P. Insufficient capacity; Q. Lack of system flexibility;
  29. 29. Strategic: R. Lack of benefits or only short-term benefits; S. Inability for outsiders to interact efficiently with DFID; T. Organisation structure no longer fits business objectives; Implementation: U. Budget, timescale, scope and other project management implementation issues. Risk register The table below analyses each of the risks defined above in terms of the risk’s impact if it should crystallise, and of the likelihood that it will crystallise. IMPACT Minor Concerning Serious LIKELIHOOD F, J, K B, E High Q C, H, I, M, P, R G, L, N, U Medium D, T A O, S Low A fuller risk analysis, together with proposed mitigation actions for each risk, is included at Appendix V.
  30. 30. 9 Next Steps This strategy lays out the path by which DFID will achieve the transformation to e-Business. As demonstrated in the previous Section, many of the individual projects which will be required to deliver the strategy are already under way. The Next Steps set out below are therefore designed to continue the process by which an overall strategic approach is taken to the development of e-Business applications. Strategic management • Use the Information Management Committee (IMC) to oversee the programme of projects which together achieve the transformation to e-Business. The IMC is made up of representatives from across DFID in order which will ensure that the programme is business led. The IMC will own this Strategy and will ensure that there is a consistent set of objectives for all the relevant projects. We will establish a reference group at working level to ensure that that the Committee is informed by the views of users. • Develop key individual accountabilities for implementation. • Publicise the existence of this Strategy throughout DFID and demonstrate senior management support. • Communicate the development and implementation of the strategy and seek input and feedback both from within DFID and from customer, partner and stakeholder organisations. • Define which are the interfaces around which cross-cutting initiatives are most likely to occur and initiate discussions with the other departments involved to create solutions for these. • Define the process by which strategy will be revisited and revised to incorporate developing ideas within DFID an emerging technology. • Integrate this Strategy into DFID’s strategic development and business planning cycle to ensure relevance and consistency with DFID’s business objectives. Knowledge management and collaborative working • Undertake a scoping project to define how best to pursue various types of collaborative technologies e.g. structured e-forum discussion groups, on-line conferences and presentations, desk top video conferencing, virtual teaming etc (various new technologies will be experimented with early in 2001). Define likely solution set. Carry out pilots. • Consider in this years resource round the case for setting up a small knowledge management team to take forward knowledge management, define good practice and spread the changes in working practices and culture which will be required to make best use of the e-Business applications which support knowledge management. • Discuss and agree pro active use of extranets with other development organisations, government departments etc. Extranets will be created around a defined community and a specific subject area.
  31. 31. • Extend the Key Words project to develop a common taxonomy for the classification of knowledge resources to be used across DFID (and if possible, across a broad sweep of the international development community). Use this as one input to managing information overload. Project rollout • Undertake further research into the costs and benefits of projects listed as potential future e- Business applications in Section 4. Refine prioritisation. • Feed projects into standard DFID business case, approval and project management process to match costs and benefits against other calls on resources. • Develop detailed Risk Management Action Plan in response to the risks outlined in Section 8. • Develop detailed e-Business data security and confidentiality protocols in order to assure internal and external stakeholders that e-Business is being developed within appropriate levels of security and control. • Carry out more detailed analysis of the rollout programme with customers, partners and stakeholders to ensure consistency and common objectives.
  32. 32. Appendices I Intensity of Interaction by Customer/ Stakeholder/ Partner Groups II Examples of e-Business Applications III DFID’s Existing e-Business Projects IV Potential Future e-Business Projects V Risk Assessment
  33. 33. Appendix I – Intensity of Interaction by Customer/Stakeholder/Partner Group Customers / Stakeholders / Partners Internal staff U K Overseas Governments Other ID Types of in developing Suppliers OGDs and Citizens Citizens Organisations interaction departments. countries Policy and strategy formulation Policy consensus Resource allocation Programme management Management of the organisation Demonstrating accountability v.high intensity high intensity of medium intensity low intensity of of interaction interaction of interaction interaction Page 32 DFID e-Business Strategy
  34. 34. Page 33 DFID e-Business Strategy
  35. 35. Appendix II – Examples of e-Business Applications Information and Knowledge Management: The benefits of information and knowledge management include knowledge sharing with customers/stakeholders (both internally and externally), problem solving, and networking and socialisation with those interested in international development, or working for related organisations. Some knowledge management facilities include: • Online databases, e.g. Tools, Methodologies, Tips and Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs); • Online Discussion Forums, real-time Chat Rooms and Webconferencing – e.g. discussions could take place between colleagues, with partners and the general public. These discussions could be live or over several hours to years. Extending this further by using web cams and microphones, webconferences could be held (e.g. Microsoft’s NETMeeting); • Electronic Document Management and Electronic Records Management – storing and retrieving records electronically and gradually replacing paper files. Colleagues can access them from an index or by searching for key words or topics. Used properly, this can prevent “reinventing the wheel”; • Portal – DFID could create a community for specific areas of interest in international development; Collaborative technologies allow employees to carry out teamwork even when they are based in different locations or working to different time zones. Functionality includes: • real time online presentations; • real time chat events; • online calendars of important events • shared address books, • bulletin boards; • document version control. Page 34 DFID e-Business Strategy
  36. 36. Customer Relationship Management (CRM): Customer Relationship Management use electronic solutions to provide an integrated approach to customer service. This can be used for electronic call management, automated customer profiling, electronic business intelligence gathering and online decision support. e-Procurement: e-Procurement is the process of connecting employees and suppliers via the Internet, making it possible to streamline and automate purchasing across departments, business units, and divisions. e-Procurement can bring self-service purchasing to any employee with a computer and Internet access. Using predetermined approval thresholds and automated approval routing, employees can easily browse through catalogues on-line and order operating resources without wasting time searching for information or designated purchasing personnel. Additionally, employees can take advantage of better predictability and tracking. e-Finance: e-Finance is the delivery of traditional finance functions through electronic means. This would include: • electronic creditor/ payments; • on line management accounts; • cost, resource, performance provision; and • treasury management. e-HR: • Online Recruiting – Online recruitment, allows an organisation to present itself to potential employees 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Advertising jobs online would provide opportunities for new applicants and secondments for existing employees. Furthermore, online application forms reduce paper usage and speed up the recruitment process; • Virtual Learning – Online training, seminars and conferences can be used to educate employees and customers/stakeholders. They can be interactive, incorporate multimedia (audio, graphics and video, etc.), and be accessible or downloadable via the Internet. Virtual training enables users to work at their own pace; determine how much information they want to cover, when they want to cover it and at what speed. Virtual learning enables more people to be trained in more areas, whilst saving costs of trainers, rooms, employee time, travel, accommodation, meals, etc; • Electronic Performance Reviews – Employees career aspirations, self-assessments and employer reviews, etc. can be completed electronically and automated through electronic workflow; Page 35 DFID e-Business Strategy
  37. 37. • Electronic Payslips – Technology can be used to monitor staff hours and legislation has recently been passed to allow electronic payslips. e-Communications: • Intranet – An Intranet applies Internet technology to the internal networks of a business, providing secure internal communications with a firewall to prevent unauthorised access. An organisation could use an Intranet for internal communications, e.g. to provide up-to-date internal news, surveying employees opinions. Intranets can also be used to access some services mentioned above (e.g. knowledge management, virtual learning, e- Procurement); • Extranet – An Extranet is an extension of an internal network that provides authorised access to individuals outside an enterprise, i.e. password protected web sites. Extranets can be used to target and interact with customers/stakeholders; • Internet – Organisational Internet sites (available to all Internet users) can be developed to enable external communications, online discussion forums, and deliver online recruiting; • Electronic Press Releases – Organisations are using online press releases to communicate more effectively and more efficiently with the media; • Internet News Service - Organisations are now using links to electronic news sources to provide up to date bulletins of relevant new stories. • E-Mail e-Operational management: Organisations increasingly are using e-Business applications to support the management of operational processes. Examples are: • Scheduling systems – Organisations use on-line systems for allocating people and resources to contracts and projects in real time. Systems such as these are designed to optimise the use of resources by making explicit decisions on prioritisation. • Project management systems – Organisations use project planning software to plan and monitor project progress and to measure performance against milestones. Risk management applications can be used to measure, monitor and mitigate risk. Progress reporting systems can collate and distribute project updates and briefings. • Business performance, evaluation and management reporting systems – applications can be used to measure, evaluate and monitor the performance of projects and of the overall business. Off the shelf packages can be tailored to the needs of an organisation to present balanced scorecard information across a range of financial and non-financial business performance indicators. A useful element of functionality in these packages is exception reporting which allows alerts to be sent automatically to designated individuals when performance on a performance indicator moves outside a pre-determined tolerance. This permits automatic escalation of issues. Page 36 DFID e-Business Strategy
  38. 38. Appendix III – DFID’s Existing e-Business Projects Information and knowledge management 1 Electronic Library: Journal and Report Literature is a prime source of external research and project development. Some of these titles are now available electronically via the Intranet. Once the Online Public Access Catalogue is developed, the Intranet will provide online search facilities, additional keyword access and ordering of documents. Department: Inf Dept/Library Timescale: Live 2 Electronic records and document management service – ERM and EDM: Electronic Records Management (ERM) will allow electronic creation, storage and retrieval of public records and will gradually replace paper files; this ensures accountability and management of the organisation and compliance with data protection requirements. The Electronic Document Management (EDM) service will manage DFID’s documents so that they are easy to find, searchable and kept under version control Department: Inf Dept/ISSD Timescale: 2004 3 Electronic news feeds: Relevant articles and news stories are delivered via an electronic news service and delivers them over DFID’s intranet. Department: Info Dept Timescale: Live 4 Key words project: Key words are required for effective access to information and will be applied as meta data within various e-business applications including PRISM, EDM and the internet and intranet. Department: Info dept Timescale: 2001 Page 37 DFID e-Business Strategy
  39. 39. 5 Web content management tools: The Department will be implementing a software solution to manage intranet and internet content to ensure information is kept up to date. Department: Info Dept Timescale: 2001 6 Groupware software: DFID currently utilise a collaborative email, calendar and scheduling tool. This application provides e-mail and an electronic diary and scheduling function. Department: ISSD Timescale: Live 7 Various discussion forums on web site: DFID operates a number of active electronic discussion forums (including some with partners), e.g. The HIV Network – a central forum for sharing new information, alerting members to significant developments elsewhere, putting people in touch with each other, moving the policy agenda forwards and gathering examples from the field. Department: Various Timescale: Ongoing 8 Information needs analysis projects: The Department has carried out a non technological scoping study to identify the key information and knowledge needs of its staff. This has been followed up with studies of specific groups of staff and made recommendations to address needs. Department: Info dept Timescale: Live 9 Best practice programme: The best practice programme is another non technical project which seeks to train and educate staff on how best to use technical applications, such as email and calendaring, to share knowledge and information and reduce information overload. Department: ISSD/Info Dept Timescale: Live Page 38 DFID e-Business Strategy
  40. 40. 10 Knowledge Network project: DFID plans to integrate with the government wide Knowledge Network. The Department intends to utilise this system to exchange briefings and papers. Department: Info Dept Timescale: ongoing. CRM 1 Public Enquiry point project: The PEP uses a dedicated team to provide a direct response to enquiries or route enquiries to the most appropriate respondent. Department:Info Dept Timescale: Live 2 Information Asset Register: A key initiative to free up access to official information to be made available on the inforoute website. Department:Info Dept Timescale: on-going 3 Direct access points on internet site: The Department's internet site provides some contact names, addresses and phone numbers for a range of externally focussed staff as well as general public enquiry point. To be taken forward together with the public websire re-design project. Department: Info Dept Timescale: Ongoing 4 Help desk support systems: DFID utlises help desk support systems to improve customer service in a number of its support service departments (eg IT help desk). These systems automatically route and log calls allowing help desk staff to deal more efficienty with their workload. Department: ISSD and others Timescale: Live Page 39 DFID e-Business Strategy
  41. 41. e-Procurement 1 UK procurement card pilot: Procurement Dept are co-ordinating the pilot of UK procurement cards for low value purchases (up to £500). Department: Various Timescale: live 2 Contracts management information system(CMIS): This project will use workflow technology to improve the delivery of contracts branch systems. Phase 1 of this project will allow staff to track bids as they progress through the organisation. Phase 2 will fully enable electronic processing of tendering activities. Department: Proc Dept/ISSD Timescale: Underway, Two phase approach due to complete 2002 e-Finance 1 BACS transfer of funds: The Accounting Service utilises BACS to transfer funds for the payment of invoices and expenses. Department: Finance Timescale: Live 2 Resource allocation and monitoring: Supports the internal departmental delegated budgeting process and cost allocation and allows in-year monitoring of expenditure. Department: Finance Timescale: Live 3 Overseas CODA: Overseas offices have the capability to process local payments of invoices locally and feed directly into the CODA accounting system based in the UK. This promotes local accountability while ensuring centralised record keeping. Department: Finance Timescale: Live 4 UK CODA: CODA is the resource accounting system used for production of management and financial accounts. Page 40 DFID e-Business Strategy
  42. 42. Department: Finance Timescale: Live 5 Web based forecasting and expenditure tools: Allows forecasting and expenditure information to be accessed by all staff via the intranet. Department: Finance Timescale: Live 6 Electronic asset register: Allows DFID assets to be recorded and reported for resource accounting purposes. Department: Finance Timescale: Live e-HR 1 Unified electronic HR and payroll system: A project is underway to procure an HR and payroll solution. The new system will support processing and management of the following HR functions: • personnel data management and processing; • training needs, progression, and planning; • recruitment administration and selection; • and payroll data management and processing. The objective is to select a solution that will facilitate web based Employee Self Service and Internet recruitment functionality. Department: HRD Timescale: 2001 e-Communications 1 E-mail: DFID is using standard e-mail applications to facilitate communications between staff worldwide. Page 41 DFID e-Business Strategy
  43. 43. Department: ISSD Timescale: Live 2 Video conferencing facilities: Video conferencing is already in place. DFID intend to continue upgrading IT and improve international communication systems. This includes video conferencing. An agreement has been reached to develop systems with FCO. Department: ISSD Timescale: ongoing 3 Internet site and intranet site redesign: DFID is currently redesigning its intranet and internet site. This process aims to make sites more interactive, understand of information needs and personalise access (possibly using push technology). Department: Inf Dept Timescale: 2001 4 GSI implementation: DFID is developing a secure Intranet connection to the rest of Government. Department: ISSD Timescale: Limited deployment live, full deployment mid 2002. 5 Virtual Private network implementation: A low cost solution allowing e-Mail to be routed via the internet between UK and overseas and allows overseas sites access to corporate systems. Department: ISSD Timescale: Live 6 100% internal staff access to the internet: All UK and overseas staff can access the internet. Department: Various Timescale: Live 7 Remote working pilots: Facilities are available to allow staff remote systems access working at home or when mobile. Department: ISSD Timescale: Live Page 42 DFID e-Business Strategy
  44. 44. e-Operational Management 1 Prism Performance Reporting Information System for Management (PRISM) is a system for electronically gathering and analysing project output and impact information. Department: Eval/ISSD Timescale: April 2001 Also, see CMIS and web based forecasting and expenditure tools, listed under e-Finance above. Page 43 DFID e-Business Strategy
  45. 45. Appendix IV – Potential Future e-Business Projects Information and knowledge management 1 Develop a common taxonomy for storing knowledge: This project would build on the existing Key Words project and would seek to develop the key words project to create a common categorisation for organising all DFID's knowledge. It would be possible to apply the taxonomy produced to a range of knowledge management applications as they are developed. Developing a common taxonomy for these systems will avoid multiple versions and will enable information to be accessed efficiently. 2 Set up Intranet and Extranet communities on key subject areas: It would be useful if existing extranet communities could be extended to include the following knowledge management functionalities: • a list of informal networks and their contacts; • online databases; • real-time chat events; • webconferencing; and • facility to share lessons learnt within networks and between communities. 1 Develop EDM/ERM – corporate policy and electronic inventory of records: Continue development and implementation of EDM and ERM and in particular: • develop a corporate policy on electronic records • create an electronic inventory of all records 1 Staff yellow pages: To help facilitate better utlisation of human resources and easier accessibility to the right staff DFID is currently considering developing an electronic database of staff names, contact details, skills etc. Page 44 DFID e-Business Strategy
  46. 46. 2 Provide, on internet, more facilitated e-Forums to enhance specific communities: DFID believes that it would be useful for the organisation to develop its exiting portfolio of structured on line discussion groups. New groups should be targeted at specific communities, both internal and external. They should also be utilised to facilitate policy development and policy consensus interactions. 3 Online conferences and presentations: On line conferences combine live voicing conferences, real-time messaging and presentations between computers over the Internet. They offer DFID a good opportunity to overcome difficulties presented by the international nature of its operations. 4 Desktop video conferences: Desktop video conferencing offers DFID's staff the opportunity to video conference through desktop computers. As with on-line conferences, desktop conferencing will enable a greater proportion of staff to effectively communicate and work with each other. 5 Development of multi-media library: Video clips, audio files, and computer graphics offer DFID a range of opportunities. In particular they could help to communicate issues and share knowledge. Creating a re-usable electronic library of these type of files would create a useful resource for DFID's staff. 6 Personalisation of intranet and web-site: A project is already underway to redesign DFID's external website. Where possible this should be extended to include further interactions and personalisation. CRM 1 Further develop the external website: There are a number of ways that DFID's external web site could be enhanced including increased personalisation, greater interactivity, enhanced content and increased customer self service functionality. 2 Develop Information Asset Register: The Information Asset Register will be developed so that all of DFID’s externally available resources can be utilised. Page 45 DFID e-Business Strategy
  47. 47. e-Procurement 1 Extend CMIS e-Tendering functionality: DFID issue and assess thousands of tenders every year. The introduction of an electronic process for receiving, routing, assessing and processing these tenders would offer the potential for significant cost savings. DFID have offered to take part in OGC led pilots. 2 Digital authentication project: In order to create a secure environment for carrying out eprocurement processes it is important that DFID consider the implementation of some form of digital authentication security system or public key infrastructure. e-Finance 1 Receipt of electronic invoices DFID could reduce its creditor/payments administration costs by implementing a system to receive and process invoices electronically. e-HR 1 e-Learning environment: DFID could utilise various software packages, with standard or bespoke content, to provide online training, seminars and conferences. Virtual learning has the advantage of allowing employees and customers/stakeholders to study at their own pace where ever they are based. 2 e-Payslips: Recent legislation has made it possible for payslips to be available online, protecting this Intranet information by personal passwords. DFID could use a variety of off the shelf software packages to implement this functionality. 3 e-Performance appraisals and competency models: On line performance review forms would enable DFID to ensure all staff complete self-assessments and employer reviews, etc. electronically. Software packages for on line reviews enable: • reviews to be routed via workflow from reviewee to reviewer; • records to be kept of reviews that are in progress and have been completed; • reminders to be sent to ensure reviews are completed on time etc. Page 46 DFID e-Business Strategy
  48. 48. e-Communications 1 Workflow applications e.g. travel, expenses, job applications etc: Electronic workflow packages could be utilised by DFID to direct information effectively in the organisation. This would reduce information overload by limiting the number of global and group e-Mails issued. By mapping authorisation routes the same packages could also be used to improve control procedures and the speed of decision making. 2 Remote working packages: DFID could implement further infrastructure to support remote working, including working away from DFID locations. 3 4 Push technologies: DFID could improve corporate communications throught the use of push technologies which ensure that memos and other information appears directly on staff's email or the intranet site. 5 Virtual Private Networks: Possibly extend VPNs to allow mobile secure access to DFID systems. 6 PDA roll out: Personal digital assistants enable staff to manage appointments and time more effectively. Through synchronisation they also mitigate against the loss of crucial information such as the dates and times of important meetings and events. 7 Personalisation of intranet and web-site: A project is already underway to redesign DFID's external website. Where possible this should be extended to include further interactions and personalisation. Page 47 DFID e-Business Strategy
  49. 49. Appendix V – Risk Analysis Risk: Impact: Likelihood: Mitigation: Minor, Low, Medium, Concerning, High Serious External: A. DFID’s interactions break legislation. For example how DFID Concerning Low Ensure DFID staff are aware of legislation and monitors e-Mails will be effected by human rights legislation or DFID policies are in place to prevent legislation being breaches the Data Protection Act broken. Information Dept are responsible for data protection and Human Resources Policy Dept for human rights legislation.. Operational: B. Lack of skills to implement the e-Business strategy because staff do Serious High Get staff buy-in to the changes, and create an not perceive the new skills as valuable. understanding of the benefits to them if they gain these new skills. C. Low take-up of new e-Business applications from outside DFID. Concerning Medium Use existing networks to publicise new facilities and ensure they are high quality, enticing visitors to return. D. Lack of e-Business, damages DFID’s credibility as an employer. This Minor Medium Early implementation of e-Business strategy. may occur if DFID follow (rather than lead) others into the new economy, then they will find it difficult to recruit staff with the right skills. E. Too much information is available. If there is lots of similar Serious High Develop guidelines for knowledge management, e.g. information on topics within the knowledge management facility, it will checking information is categorised and not repeated. become difficult to find specific information quickly. Empowerment: F. People without access to e-Business channels are excluded (for Minor High Ensure these people are represented. Consider example from giving feedback). providing access to the Internet in areas where funding has been received. G. There is no empowerment and leadership from across the Serious Medium Get leadership buy-in to the changes, ensuring they organisation in the change to e-Business. If leaders don’t support understand the benefits to their departments. these new technologies, or the change is led only by ISSD, it will be more difficult for staff to understand the need for change, hence they will also continue their old working practices. Integrity & Content: H. Bad publicity arising from media misunderstanding. This is more Concerning Medium Coincide the publication of new information with press likely to occur than in the past because more information would be releases (including contact details). available and access easier. Page 48 DFID e-Business Strategy
  50. 50. Risk: Impact: Likelihood: Mitigation: Minor, Low, Medium, Concerning, High Serious I. Inaccurate information. Since the web enables information to be Concerning Medium Keep a record of IP addresses that access web pages more easily accessed, the implications of inaccurate information are and trace e-Mails. more widespread and DFID may not know who has seen what. Both outgoing information and incoming evaluations and monitoring could be effected. J. Information may be dispersed across competitive knowledge Minor High Regularly search for similar websites and form networks, so several similar and insufficient websites may exist rather alliances with them. than one effective knowledge management site. K. Irrelevance of website content, for example people may raise out of Minor High Develop guidelines for knowledge and site date issues within discussion forums. management. Monitor discussion forums. IT Processing: L. Incompatibility of applications. e.g. DFID may intend to participate in Serious Medium Carry out full specifications before buying new cross-cutting initiatives, but find their applications are incompatible applications. Have technical experts (or contacts with with other departments. This could also occur when integrating them) to overcome these issues. applications within DFID. M. Hosting and technology problems could cause websites and other Concerning Medium Ensure support for hosting and technology, including interactions to fail. e.g. The websites may crash if the main server back-up servers. fails. N. Insufficient data security would enable hackers to change websites’ Serious Medium Check that websites are secure including the use of contents and access confidential information. IDs and passwords for the Intranet and Extranet. O. A catastrophic loss. e.g. If the main server site is destroyed and no Serious Low Backup servers to other locations. back-ups exist so that all information is lost. P. Insufficient capacity may result in there not being enough room for all Concerning Medium Ensure system is built with the necessary capacity the information. Furthermore if the number of hits to the DFID website and the ability to expand easily. is more than is available, DFID staff could be unable to contact one- another or get more information. Q. Lack of system flexibility. e.g. If new functionality is required later (to Minor Medium Carry out full specifications before buying new meet central Government requirements for example), then systems applications. Have contracts with suppliers to provide may not be able to manage. upgrades. Strategic: R. Lack of benefits or only short-term benefits. e.g. If people do not Concerning Medium Be proactive in outlining benefits. understand the benefits of an online global shared address book (providing a directory of expertise), they will not use the facility. Page 49 DFID e-Business Strategy

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