J. of the Acad. Mark. Sci. (2010) 38:326–346
DOI 10.1007/s11747-009-0164-y

 ORIGINAL EMPIRICAL RESEARCH



Customer relat...
Table 1 Selected empirical studies on performance implications of CRM

Author(s)                Adopted perspective(s) of ...
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J. of the Acad. Mark. Sci. (2010) 38:326–346                                                                              ...
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J. of the Acad. Mark. Sci. (2010) 38:326–346                                                                              ...
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J. of the Acad. Mark. Sci. (2010) 38:326–346                                                                             3...
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J. of the Acad. Mark. Sci. (2010) 38:326–346                                                                              ...
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J. of the Acad. Mark. Sci. (2010) 38:326–346                                                                              ...
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Customer relationship management and firm performance: the ...
Customer relationship management and firm performance: the ...
Customer relationship management and firm performance: the ...
Customer relationship management and firm performance: the ...
Customer relationship management and firm performance: the ...
Customer relationship management and firm performance: the ...
Customer relationship management and firm performance: the ...
Customer relationship management and firm performance: the ...
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  1. 1. J. of the Acad. Mark. Sci. (2010) 38:326–346 DOI 10.1007/s11747-009-0164-y ORIGINAL EMPIRICAL RESEARCH Customer relationship management and firm performance: the mediating role of business strategy Martin Reimann & Oliver Schilke & Jacquelyn S. Thomas Received: 17 August 2008 / Accepted: 21 July 2009 / Published online: 12 August 2009 # Academy of Marketing Science 2009 Abstract As managers and academics increasingly raise Keywords CRM . Customer relationship management . issues about the real value of CRM, the authors question its Business strategy . Structural equation modeling . direct and unconditional performance effect. The study Mediation . Industry commoditization advances research on CRM by investigating the role of critical mechanisms underlying the CRM-performance link. Drawing from the sources → positions → performance Introduction framework, the authors build a research model in which two strategic postures of firms—differentiation and cost Understanding how firms can profit from their customer leadership—mediate the effect of CRM on firm perfor- relationships is highly important for both marketing practi- mance. This investigation also contributes to the literature tioners and academics (Boulding et al. 2005; Payne and by drawing attention to the differential impact of CRM in Frow 2005). Prior research has characterized customer diverse industry environments. The study analyzes data relationship management (CRM) as fundamentally reshap- from in-depth field interviews and a large-scale, cross- ing the marketing field and evolving as a part of market- industry survey, and results reveal that CRM does not affect ing’s new dominant logic (Day 2004). Investigators have firm performance directly. Rather, the CRM-performance argued that the firm’s practices for leveraging associations link is fully mediated by differentiation and cost leadership. with customers can be fundamental to sustaining a In addition, CRM’s impact on differentiation is greater competitive advantage in the market (Hogan et al. 2002; when industry commoditization is high. Mithas et al. 2005). However, these claims are in contrast to growing skepticism about CRM. As Homburg et al. (2007) and Srinivasan and Moorman (2005) note, managers increas- M. Reimann (*) ingly raise issues about the real value of CRM. The University of Southern California, Gartner Group (2003), for example, has found that Seeley G. Mudd Building, 3620 McClintock Avenue, approximately 70% of CRM projects result in either Los Angeles, CA 90089-1061, USA e-mail: mreimann@usc.edu losses or no bottom-line improvements in firm perfor- mance. Similarly, recent academic studies report incon- O. Schilke clusive findings regarding the performance effect of CRM. Stanford University, As Table 1 indicates, results regarding the relationship 450 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305, USA between CRM and performance have been mixed, with e-mail: schilke@stanford.edu several studies finding positive relationships, others identifying insignificant links, and two reporting negative J. S. Thomas relations. Consequently, the direct and unconditional Cox School of Business, Southern Methodist University, P.O. Box 750333, Dallas, TX 75275-0333, USA performance effect of CRM has become questionable e-mail: thomasj@mail.cox.smu.edu (for a similar assessment, see Ryals 2005).
  2. 2. Table 1 Selected empirical studies on performance implications of CRM Author(s) Adopted perspective(s) of CRM Performance Impact of CRM Sample variable(s) Day and Van den Bulte Customer relating capability decomposed into three 1) Customer retention(s.r.) Positive 345 firms from (2002) components: a) orientation, b) information, and c) 2) Sales growth(s.r.) various industries information, and c) configuration. 3) Profit(s.r.) Hendricks et al. (2006) CRM systems: provide the infrastructure that 1) Long-term stock price Insignificant 80 firms from facilitates long-term relationship building with performance (a.d.) various industries customers. 2) Profitability measures(a.d.) Jayachandran Customer knowledge process: refers to the activities Firm performance(s.r.) Positive 227 retailers et al. (2004) within an organization focused on the generation, analysis, and dissemination of customer-related information J. of the Acad. Mark. Sci. (2010) 38:326–346 for the purpose of strategy development and implementation. Jayachandran 1) Customer relationship orientation: reflects the cultural Customer relationship Positive (of customer relationship 172 large business et al. (2005) propensity of the organization to undertake CRM. performance(s.r.) orientation, customer-centric units from various 2) Customer-centric management system: refers to the management systems, relational industries structure and incentives that provide an organization with information processes), insignificant the ability to build and sustain customer relationships. (of CRM technology use) 3) Relational information processes: systematize the capture and use of customer information so that a firm’s effort to build relationships is not rendered ineffective by poor communication, information loss and overload, and inappropriate information use. 4) CRM technology use: includes front office applications that support sales, marketing, and service; a data depository; and back office applications that help integrate and analyze the data. Mithas et al. Customer relationship management applications: facilitate 1) Customer knowledge(a.d.) Positive 360 large U.S. (2005) organizational learning about customers by enabling firms to 2) Customer satisfaction(a.d.) firms analyze purchase behavior across transactions through different channels and customer touchpoints. Ramani and Interaction orientation: reflects a firm’s ability to interact with 1) Customer-based profit Positive 125 firms from Kumar (2008) its individual customers and to take advantage of information performance(s.r.) various industries obtained from them through successive interactions to achieve 2) Customer-based relational profitable customer relationships. performance(s.r.) Reinartz et al. 1) CRM process: systematic and proactive management of relationships Firm performance (s.r.& a.d.) Positive (of CRM initiation, 211 firms from (2004) as they move from beginning (initiation) to end (termination). maintenance, termination), various industries 2) CRM-compatible organizational alignment: appropriate nonsignificant (of CRM- compensation schemes and organizational structures. compatible organizational alignment), 3) CRM technology: information technology that is deployed negative (of CRM technology) for the specific purpose of better initiating, maintaining, and/or terminating customer relationships. Sin et al. (2005) CRM: CRM is a multi-dimensional construct consisting of 1) Marketing performance(s.r.) Positive 215 financial firms four broad behavioral components: key customer focus, CRM 2) Financial performance(s.r.) organization, knowledge management, and technology-based CRM 327
  3. 3. 328 J. of the Acad. Mark. Sci. (2010) 38:326–346 187 online retailers Indirect performance effect of CRM 215 service firms 129 theaters Amid these conflicting positions, Zablah et al. (2004) argue Sample that mechanisms through which CRM enhances perfor- mance are not well understood, and therefore managers have little guidance on how to focus their CRM efforts. Shugan (2005) asserts that more research is needed to isolate the generative mechanisms through which CRM negative (on expenses, income) implementation dimension and affects a firm’s performance. These reservations demon- Mixed (depending on CRM strate that the link from CRM to firm performance is Insignificant (on revenue), unclear and potentially not a direct association. dependent variable) To date, few studies have considered the possibility that Impact of CRM important intervening variables may mediate the relationship between CRM and firm performance, and thus they fail to shed light on the underlying process of performance improve- Positive ment through CRM (Zablah et al. 2004; Shugan 2005). As inconclusive findings have emerged from the academic literature regarding the direct effect of CRM on Customer satisfaction (s.r.) firm performance, it is imperative that researchers more Customer retention(s.r.) Customer satisfaction(s.r.) thoroughly inspect the process through which CRM results Net income (a.d.) in higher performance. This study builds on the existing Expenses(a.d.) Revenue(a.d.) research stream that emphasizes the relevance of business Performance strategy, and has as its first objective to empirically advance variable(s) our understanding of the relationships between CRM, business strategies, and firm performance. Our specific 1) 2) 3) 1) 2) focus is to analyze whether CRM links directly to firm performance or whether this relationship is mediated by acquiring, disseminating, and responding to customer information. and preferences into developing and modifying product offerings. business strategies. In particular, we consider the mediating Customer learning orientation: incorporates customer expectations activities: a) focusing on key customers, b) organizing around effects of two main strategic postures of firms: differenti- CRM activities and CRM acquisition and retention expenses. CRM implementation: usually involves four specific ongoing ation and cost leadership. Our results show that CRM 2) Firm CRM capability: an organization-wide system for 1) Firm CRM system investments: firm’s investments in creates value by enhancing the business strategies of the CRM, c) managing knowledge, and d) incorporating firm, which in turn drive performance. Thus, we contribute to current knowledge by shedding light on the ‘black box’ that exists between CRM and firm performance. Conditional effect of CRM Adopted perspective(s) of CRM We also acknowledge that CRM may only create value under specific environmental circumstances (Ryals 2005). CRM-based technology. While the majority of the literature tends to be silent about how a particular context may interact with CRM to produce differential results, Boulding et al. (2005) state that CRM activities may have a differential effect depending on the context in which they are analyzed. Thus, the second s.r. self reports; a.d. archival data objective of this study is to isolate conditions under which CRM especially influences business strategy. Consistent with this objective, we need to identify certain character- Table 1 (continued) istics that define diverse environments relevant to the Moorman (2005) Yim et al. (2004) effectiveness of CRM. Given the relative infancy of CRM Srinivasan and Voss and Voss research, our choice of potential moderating variables is Author(s) large. Prior research has shown that firms successfully (2008) compete while using CRM approaches regardless of whether they supply services or goods in the business-to-
  4. 4. J. of the Acad. Mark. Sci. (2010) 38:326–346 329 consumer or business-to-business arenas (Coviello et al. Various authors expound on these core ideas, and in 2002). Therefore, a fruitful inquiry will go beyond the doing so, derive varied conceptualizations of CRM and its general classifications of “services/goods” and “business-to- practice (for a review, see Payne and Frow 2005). For consumer/business-to-business” (Jayachandran et al. 2005). example, customer learning orientation (Voss and Voss Recent research indicates that CRM may be key to 2008), interaction orientation (Ramani and Kumar 2008), superior strategic positioning particularly in highly commo- customer relationship orientation (Jayachandran et al. ditized industries (Matthyssens and Vandenbempt 2008). 2005), key customer focus (Sin et al. 2005), and customer We consider commoditization to occur when competitors in knowledge process (Jayachandran et al. 2004) are variant stable industries offer increasingly homogenous products to terminologies that all relate to the basic premise of the price-sensitive customers, who incur relatively low costs in CRM concept—customers are crucial assets that firms changing suppliers. Researchers have demonstrated that should learn from and manage for value. Many of these commoditization is not limited to a single industry but conceptualizations also accept the perspective that the rather is a trend occurring in a growing number of diverse customer-firm relationship evolves through three stages— industries (Olson and Sharma 2008; Rangan and Bowman initiation, maintenance, and termination. 1992; Sharma and Sheth 2004). For this reason, the Given the thematic consistency in the CRM-related question of how companies can successfully compete as research, for the purposes of this study we base our concept their environment becomes commoditized has high practi- of CRM on the dominant and consistent views. More cal relevance. Hence, we investigate the differential effect specifically, we assert that firms adopting CRM can be of CRM on business strategies across different levels of identified by their relational practices (Jayachandran et al. industry commoditization. This second research objective 2005) and view customer relationships as evolving over contributes both to the empirical investigation of the time (Blattberg et al. 2001). In line with this perspective, commoditization phenomenon and to a greater understand- we formally define CRM as the firms’ practices to ing of the differential impact of CRM in diverse firm systematically manage their customers to maximize value environments. across the relationship lifecycle. The remainder of this paper is organized as follows. For clarification, the next section discusses the perspective of CRM that we adopt in this research. Next, we lay out the Theoretical background theoretical background of our study. In the section on “Hypotheses development”, we focus on the mediated The conceptual framework of our study is primarily rooted performance effect of CRM, as well as the moderating in industrial economics theory and the sources→posi- effect of different levels of industry commoditization. tions→performance framework. Research in industrial Subsequently, we present the methodology and the empir- economics suggests two major ways of earning above- ical results. Finally, we discuss managerial implications and average rates of return: differentiation and cost leadership derive implications for further research. (Porter 1980, 1985). Differentiation entails being unlike or distinct from competitors, e.g., by providing superior information, prices, distribution channels, and prestige to The concept of CRM the customer (Porter 1980). Differentiation insulates a business from competitive rivalry, protecting it from CRM begins with the basic premise that firms view competitive forces that reduce margins (Phillips et al. customers as manageable strategic assets of the firm (Rust 1983). An alternative strategy, cost leadership, involves et al. 2000; Blattberg et al. 2001). Moving beyond this basic the generation of higher margins than competitors by concept, the customer-firm relationship has been dissected achieving lower manufacturing and distribution costs. into stages and firms have attempted to manage and Firms pursuing a cost leadership strategy often have highly strategize about those relationship stages. In general terms, stable product lines, a relentless substitution of capital for those stages are (1) customer relationship (re)initiation, less efficient labor, and a strong emphasis on formal profit (2) customer relationship maintenance (i.e., relationship and budget controls (Davis and Schul 1993; Miller 1988). duration management and customer value enhancement), While earlier literature posited an incompatibility of and (3) customer relationship termination management (e.g., these business strategies and claimed that firms should Blattberg et al. 2001; Reinartz et al. 2004; Thomas et al. concentrate on only one strategy at a time to avoid an 2004). Extant literature reflects a consistent belief that firms uncommitted, stuck-in-the-middle position (Porter 1980), should systematically engage in and learn from the more recent evidence suggests that firms can successfully customer-firm relationships that occur throughout these pursue differentiation and cost leadership in parallel (Kotha relationship stages. and Vadlamani 1995). In fact, in many industries, relying
  5. 5. 330 J. of the Acad. Mark. Sci. (2010) 38:326–346 on only one of the two strategies leaves a business effect of CRM (as a source) is mediated by the business vulnerable to competitors. Thus, Miller and Dess (1993) strategies of the firm (as positions), which in turn yield recommended not to perceive differentiation and cost superior firm performance. This perspective is in line with leadership as “either/or” categories, but to consider both Palmatier et al. (2006) and Sawhney and Zabin (2002), who strategies and test for their impact on firm performance. argue that investigations of CRM’s effects on firm Recent research on this subject has emphasized that both performance should consider business strategies. It also differentiation and cost leadership strategies have a positive concurs with Payne and Frow (2005), who emphasize the impact on performance (Acquaah and Yasai-Ardekani need for “a dual focus on the organization’s business 2008). strategy and its customer strategy” (p. 170). Day and Wensley (1988) extend Porter’s (1980) work by A major advantage of CRM lies in its potential to help introducing the sources→positions→performance frame- firms understand customer behavior and needs in more work of competitive advantage. Besides acknowledging the detail (Campbell 2003; King and Burgess 2008). By performance impact of positional advantages in terms of systematically accumulating and processing information superior customer value (differentiation) and lower relative across the relationship lifecycle, CRM enables firms to costs (cost leadership), this framework embraces elements shape appropriate responses to customer behavior and from the resource-based view by arguing that organization- needs and effectively differentiate their offerings (Mithas al capabilities are the key sources of positional advantages. et al. 2005). In particular, CRM can affect future marketing CRM is explicitly mentioned as a distinctive organizational decisions, such as communication, price, distribution, and capability with the potential of being a major source of a brand differentiation (Ramaseshan et al. 2006; Richards and firm’s positional advantage (Day 1994, 2004; Day and Van Jones 2008). For example, many hotel chains are able to den Bulte 2002). This perception is especially consistent flexibly manage their room pricing on the basis of customer with the perspective adopted in this paper. Our conceptu- data collected previously (Nunes and Dréze 2006). alization of CRM focuses on the practices firms use to In summary, CRM enables the firm to obtain in-depth systematically manage their customers to maximize value. information about its customers and then use this knowl- This view strongly reflects resource-based logic, where edge to adapt its offerings to meet the needs of its capabilities are understood as “discrete practices” (Knott customers in a better way than does its competition. 2003, p. 935) that aim at “the coordinated deployment of Therefore, CRM is linked to the business strategy of assets in a way that helps a firm achieve its goals” (Sanchez differentiation, which enables firms to achieve superior et al. 1996, p. 8). Thus, in line with Day (1994, 2004) and outcomes. This link is consistent with the sources→ Day and Van den Bulte (2002), we posit that CRM can be positions→performance framework, with CRM as the thought of as an organizational capability. Within the source that allows firms to achieve a differentiated position, sources→positions→performance framework, CRM—as which in turn drives firm performance (Day and Wensley an organizational capability—has the potential to be a 1988). Thus, we offer the following hypothesis: source of advantage, which in turn permits businesses to H1: Differentiation mediates the relationship between improve their positioning and ultimately enhance their CRM and performance. performance. Finally, Day and Wensley (1988) argue that sources of positional advantage “are tailored closely to the type of We also assert that CRM enhances the business business; the key success factors for machine tools do not strategy of cost leadership. We argue that firms can apply to college book publishing” (p. 5), suggesting the improve their operations and strive for cost leadership by need to consider industry-related moderating factors when using CRM information. More specifically, by integrating analyzing the link between sources and positions. There- CRM into the fabric of their operations (Boulding et al. fore, they provide theoretical guidance for our second 2005), firms can reduce sales and service costs, increase objective, which is to investigate the differential effect of buyer retention, and lower customer replacement expendi- CRM in different industry environments. tures (Reichheld 1996). This position is based on the notion that CRM increases the length of beneficial customer-firm relationships. Long-term customer relation- Hypotheses development ships have been found to result in lower customer management costs (Reichheld and Sasser 1990), and thus Indirect performance effects of CRM they help improve a firm’s cost side. In addition, CRM requires firms to calculate and control customer relation- On the basis of the sources→positions→performance ship costs and compare them to the profits each customer framework, we propose a model in which the performance produces over its lifetime (Reinartz et al. 2004). By doing
  6. 6. J. of the Acad. Mark. Sci. (2010) 38:326–346 331 so, firms identify and focus on the profitable customers. In the context of where and when they are implemented” the airline industry, for example, CRM has been reported (p. 158). to result in significant cost reductions by eliminating waste In accordance with these positions, we consider the associated with targeting unprofitable customers (Binggelt moderating effect of industry commoditization and con- et al. 2002). ceptualize it as a construct ranging from low to high Moreover, it has become increasingly important to (Zahra and Covin 1993). Businesses with high industry translate the customer knowledge gained through CRM commoditization sell products whose core offerings are into superior production processes, as suggested by essentially identical in quality and performance to those of prominent operations management concepts such as quality their competitors (Narver and Slater 1990). Further, function deployment (QFD) and house of quality (Griffin commoditized markets are relatively stable, as products and Hauser 1993). QFD enables firms to transform are manufactured to a standard or fixed specification customer needs and wants into technical requirements to (Hambrick 1983). In addition, rational factors govern reduce production costs. Therefore, we posit that CRM has purchasing decisions (Robinson et al. 2002), resulting in the potential to bring the voice of the customer into the high price sensitivity and low switching costs for customers processes of operations and enable firms to link customer (Alajoutsijärvi et al. 2001; Davenport 2005). desires to production requirements (Cristiano et al. 2000). Pertaining to the moderating effect of industry commo- For example, the Lexus brand continuously contributes a ditization, we posit that CRM has a stronger effect on double-digit share to Toyota’s total operating profits while differentiation at high levels of industry commoditization representing only marginal, single-digit unit volume. This than at low levels. While differentiation may be possible success results from Lexus’s efficiency, which is based on with high industry commoditization (Levitt 1980), it is the company’s ability to link its manufacturing prowess to a generally harder to achieve in those markets. For example, careful customer analysis (Stalk and Webber 1993). highly homogeneous products leave only marginal room for In addition, by using knowledge from customer encoun- brand differentiation. High industry stability and thus a low ters, firms can also gain advantages in forecasting their rate of innovation provide fewer opportunities to differen- demand (Bharadwaj 2000). Moreover, the successful tiate in terms of new communication or distribution instru- implementation of CRM processes can contribute to greater ments. To identify the remaining levers of differentiation, customer loyalty (Reichheld 1996), which in turn results in firms facing high industry commoditization need to lower volatility of demand. Both improved forecasting and understand their customers’ needs at a very detailed level. lower volatility of demand enhance the firm’s ability to plan This thinking is in line with Johnson et al. (2006), who ahead, and hence, reduces storage costs and improves posit that the more homogeneous a product, the more firms resource utilization. must focus on relationships as a source of differentiation. In summary, CRM enables a firm to understand its Thus, CRM becomes an even more important source of customers better, which is fundamental to deciding which differentiating a firm and its offerings as commoditization customers to serve and retain as well as to optimizing increases. operations and forecasting demand. Therefore, we posit that We find anecdotal support for our position from CRM indirectly affects firm performance by increasing Alajoutsijärvi et al. (2001). They show that in the paper efficiency and driving down costs, implying that CRM industry—a highly commoditized market—paper producers positively affects a firm’s cost leadership position, leading that were very sensitive to customers’ specific needs were to superior firm performance. Thus: able to provide their customers with a highly customized and differentiated marketing mix. Further, as one of the co- H2: Cost leadership mediates the relationship between authors of the present paper observed when working with CRM and performance. the firm, the industrial gases manufacturer Linde illustrates various ways CRM can help to differentiate particularly in Moderating effects of industry commoditization high commodity markets. For example, Linde was recently encouraged by some of its customers to better distinguish Current research has also inquired for the contextual between similar lines of products that differ only in their reasons why CRM has been frustrating for some firms, aggregate state. Here, branding was used to set the offering and why other firms succeed in their CRM activities apart from similar competitive offerings. Moreover, CRM (Rogers 2005). Empirical evidence has stressed the impor- also helped Linde to improve its distribution differentiation. tance of moderating effects, indicating that more CRM is Through CRM, Linde gathered valuable information that not always better (Niraj et al. 2001; Reinartz and Kumar enabled it to open a new distribution channel, Ecovar 2000). Boulding et al. (2005) stated that “it is not surprising Supply System. Learning that several customers strongly that CRM activities have a differential effect depending on appreciate flexible but immediate gas supply, Linde
  7. 7. 332 J. of the Acad. Mark. Sci. (2010) 38:326–346 designed Ecovar to include a wide range of different on-site Methodology gas production systems with sufficient flexibility to adapt to the customer’s varying demand. Overall, the information Field interviews gathered through CRM was a significant driver of Linde’s differentiation efforts. To obtain a better understanding of the specifics of high and In sum, in commoditized markets, firms such as Linde low industry commoditization, we initially conducted six have little room for differentiation, making their systematic in-depth interviews with marketing executives from a practices to engage with their customers even more variety of industries (see “Appendix”, Table A-1 for important with respect to differentiation strategy. For firms participant and firm characteristics). We briefly summarize in industries with low commoditization, however, sources the main insights gained from these interviews. of differentiation are much easier to recognize because John, a marketing officer at a beef production company, technological advances occur on a frequent basis and alluded to important characteristics of a commoditized customers are keener to adapt new offerings. Given the market: “We compete on beef with four other direct abundant opportunities to offer something different, the competitors that have large-scale operations, as we do. value of CRM in terms of identifying ways to differentiate This has been the case for the past 12 years. Due to tight should therefore be lower if industry commoditization is food safety regulations, offerings in our industry do not low. Thus, we hypothesize: differ much…. Our customers, mainly retailers, look at the price when purchasing.” This statement is consistent with H3: The relationship between CRM and differentia- the notion that commoditized markets are relatively stable, tion is stronger if industry commoditization is high as products are manufactured to a standard or fixed than if industry commoditization is low. specification (Hambrick 1983) and purchasing decisions are governed by rational factors (Robinson et al. 2002), Finally, we assert that CRM affects cost leadership more at resulting in high price sensitivity and low switching costs high industry commoditization than at low commoditization. for customers (Alajoutsijärvi et al. 2001; Burnham et al. Several factors led us to this assertion. First, on the customer 2003; Davenport 2005). side, high industry commoditization is characterized by low Another interviewee from a high commodity industry, switching cost and a high level of price sensitivity. Both Bill, noted, “In energy supply, the core product is characteristics may result in frequent changes in the customer electricity, which comes in standardized configurations”— portfolio of the firm. A major objective of CRM is to achieve a characterization reinforced by Thomas, a marketing and maintain ongoing relationships with customers. Accord- executive of a global mining company: “You will find that ingly, customer relationship management efforts can poten- we sell mostly raw materials such as copper, ore, or stones, tially have a significant impact on customer replacement costs which are basically identical in core characteristics.” These in highly commoditized industries. In less commoditized two statements also stress that firms sell highly homoge- industries, on the other hand, customers face higher switching nous products in commoditized markets, which points to costs and tend to be less price-sensitive. With a lower threat of product homogeneity as an important facet of industry customer migration, we expect the positive effect of CRM on commoditization. customer replacement costs to be more moderate, thus leading In contrast to the above characterizations, Dan, the chief to only marginal improvement in the cost leadership position. executive officer of an underwear manufacturer, presented a Furthermore, with high industry commoditization, pro- different picture of his industry: “Competing offerings in duction technologies are fairly stable among competitors the underwear business differ widely…. Once customers (Hambrick 1983). Many firms have similar production cost enjoy our product, they tend to repurchase our brand over and structures (Hill 1988). In their efforts to still identify ways over again.” Similarly, Stacy, a marketing executive of an to cut costs further, these firms often strive for increased office furniture company, told us, “Our products really do efficiency in areas such as marketing while trying not to stick out from competing companies, which is very important adversely affect customer demand (NAK 2008). Insights since smaller, flexible furniture makers enter the market.” derived from CRM initiatives can help in this regard. For Additionally, Terry, who is leading the marketing efforts of a example, detailed information pertaining to customers’ recognized miniature toy company, said, “We are also distribution or communication preferences could lead to maintaining a unique product portfolio, which customers lower marketing spending, improving the cost leadership love and pay for, and that is highly different from our main position. In sum, we propose the following: competitor.” These three statements suggest that product H4: The relationship between CRM and cost leader- offerings in these more dynamic markets can vary widely and ship is stronger if industry commoditization is high that customers may be less price-sensitive and less prone to than if industry commoditization is low. switch suppliers than in highly commoditized industries.
  8. 8. J. of the Acad. Mark. Sci. (2010) 38:326–346 333 In sum, our field interviews yield insights into signifi- differentiation: communication differentiation (Boulding et cant and important sectoral differences that exist between al. 1994; Hill 1990), price differentiation (Hooley and different levels of industry commoditization. Greenley 2005), distribution differentiation (Costanzo et al. 2003), and brand differentiation (Chaudhuri and Holbrook Questionnaire development and measures 2001; Smith and Park 1992; Wirtz et al. 2007). Hill (1990) suggests that communication is integral to To test our hypotheses, we used a standardized question- differentiation. More specifically, he asserts that effective naire as the main data collection instrument. Our marketing communications are required to relay the questionnaire contained two sections. In the first section, message that the firm is different from, and better than, items for CRM, differentiation, cost leadership, industry competitors. Thus, communication differentiation can be commoditization, and performance were presented on defined as advertising and promotion in a unique way. five-point rating scales (1 = “I fully disagree” and 5 = “I Price differentiation refers to selling products at higher or fully agree”). In the second section, we asked for socio- lower prices than competitors (Hooley and Greenley demographic data (gender, position in the company, 2005). Distribution differentiation requires using mecha- length of company affiliation in years, and amount of nisms of distribution different from those of competitors knowledge about the company’s strategy). We also asked (Costanzo et al. 2003). Finally, brand differentiation for company-related data regarding financials, employ- involves efforts aimed at making a brand unique from ees, competitors, and customers (annual sales, number of competitors’ brands. Building a strong unique brand can employees, industry affiliation, and share of sales directly provide differentiation in the minds of consumers, and to the end consumer). thus may add value to the product offerings (Forsyth et al. We used two types of measures in the first section of the 2000; Wirtz et al. 2007). Therefore, many firms seek survey: reflective and formative measurement models. to achieve differentiation by branding their products When indicators (and their variances and covariances) were (McQuiston 2004). manifestations of underlying constructs, we used a reflec- To measure differentiation, we constructed a second- tive measurement model (Bagozzi and Baumgartner 1994). order construct of type II: reflective first-order, formative In contrast, when a construct was a summary index of its second-order (Jarvis et al. 2003). Each of the first-order indicators, a formative measurement model was more dimensions was measured using multiple indicators adapted appropriate (Diamantopoulos and Winklhofer 2001). The from existing scales. Measures for communication and above criteria can be applied to both the relationships price differentiation were based on Kotha and Vadlamani between the items and the first-order construct, as well as (1995) and Nayyar (1993), while distribution differentiation between the first-order dimensions and the second-order was measured according to Bienstock et al. (1997). factor (Jarvis et al. 2003). Measures for brand differentiation were adapted from Chaudhuri and Holbrook (2001) and Davis and Schul CRM Customer relationship management (CRM) is (1993). defined as a firm’s practices to systematically manage its customers to maximize value across the relationship Cost leadership The cost leadership business strategy aims lifecycle. In operationalizing CRM, we followed Reinartz at achieving low manufacturing and distribution costs et al. (2004) and measured CRM as a second-order (Narver and Slater 1990; Nayyar 1993; Porter 1980). We construct of type IV: formative first-order, formative based our reflective measure of cost leadership on Narver second-order (Jarvis et al. 2003). The three first-order and Slater (1990) and Nayyar (1993). dimensions included CRM initiation, CRM maintenance, and CRM termination. We adopted measurement items for Performance We followed the lead of Vorhies and Morgan each dimension from Reinartz et al. (2004). In its entirety, (2005) as well as Schilke et al. (in press) in measuring firm the CRM measure captured major facets of evaluation and performance as a three-dimensional, second-order construct management activities along customer-company relation- of type I: reflective first-order, reflective second-order ships, as well as the major subprocesses within those (Jarvis et al. 2003). The first-order dimensions were facets. profitability (degree of financial performance), customer satisfaction (degree of customer-oriented success), and Differentiation Firms can strive to be unique within their market effectiveness (degree to which the firm’s market- industry in a number of ways (Mintzberg 1988; Wirtz et al. based goals had been achieved). Such a multidimensional 2007). “Ideally, the firm differentiates itself along several conceptualization of performance incorporating both quan- dimensions” (Porter 1980, p. 37). On the basis of the extant titative and qualitative aspects has been extensively applied literature, we identified four important dimensions of in strategy research (e.g., Dvir et al. 1993; Venkatraman
  9. 9. 334 J. of the Acad. Mark. Sci. (2010) 38:326–346 1989) and recommended repeatedly to capture the complex commoditization (we elaborate on this in our data analysis). nature of the phenomenon (Bhargava et al. 1994; Katsikeas A total of 318 usable responses were returned, representing et al. 2000). Each of the three dimensions (profitability, a response rate of 16%. customer satisfaction, and market effectiveness) was mea- sured using four items based on Vorhies and Morgan Respondent characteristics Of the 318 respondents, the (2005). majority (57.5%) were male managers. The average respondent had a company affiliation of 9.2 years and a Industry commoditization The literature mentions four self-reported high to very high knowledge of the company’s distinct aspects as characterizing high industry commodi- strategy. tization, which we include in our research to measure industry commoditization. The first aspect is low switch- Company characteristics The average company had an ing costs as a combination of buyers’ economic risk, annual sales revenue of between USD 50 and 100 million evaluation, learning, set-up, and loss costs (Burnham et and had between 500 and 1,000 employees. In 41.9% of the al. 2003). The second is high price sensitivity, as buyers in firms, 50% or less of total sales were direct to the end highly commoditized industries are looking for the best consumer. In 58.1% of the firms, the proportion of direct price for a standard product on the assumption that sales to the end consumer was 51% or more. products with essentially equivalent quality and features will continue to be available (Alajoutsijärvi et al. 2001; Nonresponse bias According to the recommendations of Davenport 2005). The third characteristic is high product Armstrong and Overton (1977), we assessed a nonresponse homogeneity, as customers perceive products in highly bias by comparing early and late respondents. The t-tests of commoditized markets to be interchangeable (Bakos 1997; the group means revealed no significant differences. Greenstein 2004; Pelham 1997; Robinson et al. 2002), and Moreover, we examined whether the firms we initially the fourth is high industry stability, which includes addressed differed from the responding firms in terms of predictable market demand and few product- and size (approximated by the number of employees) and technology-related changes (Day and Wensley 1983; industry segment. We found no significant differences. Pelham 1997). We developed multi-item scales to measure the four first- Common method bias When data on two or more con- order dimensions of the type II industry commoditization structs are collected from the same person and correlations construct (reflective first-order, formative second-order). between these constructs need to be interpreted, common For the switching costs construct, we created an item pool method bias may be present (Podsakoff and Organ 1986). based on Burnham et al. (2003). We based the items for We took several steps to address this issue. First, we price sensitivity on Lichtenstein et al. (1988), while the arranged the measurement scales in the questionnaire so items for the product homogeneity construct were based on the measures of the dependent variable followed, rather Sheth (1985) and Hill (1990). Finally, we based the items than preceded, those of the independent variables (Salancik for the industry stability construct on the indicators used by and Pfeffer 1977). Second, we employed Harman’s one- Achrol and Stern (1988) and Gilley and Rasheed (2000). factor test, in which no single, general factor was extracted A list of all items is provided in the “Appendix” (Podsakoff and Organ 1986). Third, we re-estimated our (Table A-2). structural model with all the indicator variables loading on an unmeasured latent method factor (MacKenzie et al. Data collection 1993).1 No individual path coefficient corresponding to the relationships between the indicators and the method Sampling procedure The sampling frame consisted of factor was significant. Moreover, the overall pattern of 2,045 U.S.-based business units, identified through a significant relationships was not affected by common commercial database. At these business units, key inform- method variance (i.e., all of the paths that were significant ants (chief executive officer, vice president of marketing, when the common method variance was not controlled vice president of sales, marketing director, or sales director) remained significant when common method variance was were asked to participate in our study and were provided controlled). with the questionnaire. Firms were affiliated with one of the following ten industries: energy supply, mining, forestry and logging, agriculture and hunting, pharmaceuticals, underwear, outerwear, wearing apparel and accessories, furniture, and toys. We chose these industries to capture a 1 For identification purposes, it was necessary to constrain factor variety of firms ranging from high to low industry loadings within constructs to be equal when estimating this model.
  10. 10. J. of the Acad. Mark. Sci. (2010) 38:326–346 335 Estimation approach validity of the three CRM dimensions, we correlated the formative items with another, conceptually related variable We tested our hypotheses by applying the covariance- external to the index (Diamantopoulos and Winklhofer based structural equation modeling software AMOS 16.0 2001). More specifically, since we expected our three CRM and using the maximum likelihood (ML) procedure. To dimensions to be related to customer relationship orienta- assess reliability and validity of our multi-item con- tion, each indicator of the three CRM factors was correlated structs, we ran confirmatory factor analysis for each with the statement, “Our organization has a strong construct individually using AMOS 16.0 for reflective orientation towards customer relationships.” All of the constructs and partial least squares (PLS, specifically CRM indicators were significantly correlated with this PLS-Graph 3.0) for formative constructs. PLS, a statement (p<.05), suggesting satisfactory external validity variance-based structural equation modeling approach, of the CRM measures. provided the means for directly estimating the compo- Subsequently, we examined the loadings of the three nent scores and avoiding the parameter identification dimensions on the second-order factor CRM using PLS problems that can occur with formative measurement analysis. The results provided support for the proposed models under covariance-based analysis (Bollen 1989; conceptualization of CRM as a formative second-order Chin and Newsted 1999). In the PLS analysis, second- construct. The path coefficients were positive (.42, .52, .08) order factors were approximated using the hierarchical and significant (p<.01). In addition, all weights of the component model (Lohmöller 1989; Wetzels et al. 2009; indicators measuring the formative first-order constructs Wold 1980). turned out to be positive and, except in the case of three of the 39 indicators, significant (p<.05). After careful inspec- tion of the three indicators, we dropped them from further Results analyses. Similar steps were taken to further assess the formative Measure assessment second-order constructs differentiation and industry com- moditization (whose reflective first-order dimensions were For each reflective first-order construct, item reliability was previously evaluated in AMOS). In the PLS analysis, all analyzed by examining the squared factor loadings. As a four differentiation dimensions had positive (.28, .23, .24, general guideline, item reliability should exceed .4 (Bagozzi .42) and significant (p<.01) paths on the second-order and Baumgartner 1994), which corresponds with factor factor of differentiation. Likewise, the paths between the loadings being greater than .63. Composite reliability (CR) four commoditization dimensions and the second-order and average variance extracted (AVE) were analyzed to factor were positive (.32, .28, .30, .32) and significant test construct reliability and validity. Bagozzi and Yi (p<.01). For the purpose of subsequent hypothesis testing (1988) recommend threshold values of .7 for CR and .5 for in AMOS, we computed factor scores for the three AVE. Finally, Cronbach’s alpha was examined for each formative second-order constructs (CRM, differentiation, construct. Nunnally (1978) recommends a threshold alpha and industry commoditization) by weighted multiplication value of .7. For our measures, factor loadings, CR, AVE, of the individual indicators with the standardized PLS and Cronbach’s alpha were indicative of good psychometric estimates (Reinartz et al. 2004).2 properties (“Appendix”, Table A-2). Together with content validity established by expert agreement, these results Structural model provide empirical evidence for construct validity. We then assessed discriminant validity on the basis of the criterion After establishing confidence in the appropriateness of the that Fornell and Larcker (1981) propose. The results measures, we examined the structural model. Figure 1 indicate no problems with respect to discriminant validity (Table 2). Formative constructs require a different assessment ap- 2 In order to avoid underidentification of the AMOS model, we proach. Following the recommendations of Diamantopoulos adopted common practice and fixed the factor scores’ error variances to zero (Fuchs and Diamantopoulos 2009; Kenny et al. 1998). and Winklhofer (2001), we evaluated indicator collinearity Following the suggestion by Kline (2005), we reestimated our and external validity for the three CRM factors. The structural model with a range of values for the measurement error variance inflation factors ranged from 2.14 to 2.80 for variance. Using the error variance formula suggested by Jöreskog and CRM initiation, from 1.99 to 3.03 for CRM maintenance, Sörbom (1988)—i.e., θ1 =VAR(x1)×(1-assumed reliability of x1)— we reestimated the model shown in Fig. 1 with assumed reliabilities of and from 2.06 to 2.48 for CRM termination. Thus, all .7, .8, and .9. The structural estimates remained significant in all cases, variance inflation factors were below the common cut-off showing that they are not substantially affected by the level of value of 10 (Kleinbaum et al. 1988). To assess the external measurement error in the factor scores that is assumed.
  11. 11. 336 J. of the Acad. Mark. Sci. (2010) 38:326–346 Table 2 Correlations and discriminant validity 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 1 Switching costs .50 2 Price sensitivity .20 .50 3 Product homogeneity .34 .26 .48 4 Industry stability .36 .18 .37 .50 5 CRM initiation .12 .15 .16 .12 –– 6 CRM maintenance .11 .13 .12 .11 .77 –– 7 CRM termination .11 .14 .18 .21 .44 .39 –– 8 Communication differentiation .20 .21 .21 .18 .38 .39 .16 .59 9 Price differentiation .19 .19 .22 .20 .34 .30 .33 .33 .50 10 Distribution differentiation .21 .20 .17 .15 .40 .39 .16 .45 .28 .48 11 Brand differentiation .18 .18 .16 .17 .39 .39 .21 .50 .38 .39 .50 12 Cost leadership .08 .10 .10 .09 .34 .40 .15 .27 .12 .27 .26 .50 13 Customer satisfaction .12 .15 .08 .09 .36 .44 .12 .35 .28 .33 .33 .31 .58 14 Market effectiveness .13 .14 .15 .21 .36 .35 .25 .29 .30 .28 .29 .20 .50 .61 15 Profitability .10 .11 .14 .19 .37 .35 .24 .31 .33 .28 .25 .19 .40 .60 .69 AVE not available for formative constructs Bold numbers on the diagonal show the AVE, numbers below the diagonal the squared correlations presents our structural model and the estimates obtained insignificant (βdirect =.12; p>.1). Thus, differentiation and from AMOS. cost leadership fully mediate the link between CRM and The fit measures for the structural model showed performance, supporting H1 and H2. satisfactory values (χ2 = 420.63; df = 147; χ2/df = 2.86; To test hypotheses H3 and H4, we applied covariance- CFI=.93; NFI=.90; TLI=.92; SRMR=.05). The path coef- based multiple group structural equation modeling (for a ficients indicated that we found overall support for the review, see Qureshi and Compeau 2009), conducting proposed model. The relationship between CRM and the separate analyses for the low and high commodity markets. two business strategies was confirmed in this study; that is, Based on a thorough review of the literature, some CRM predicted differentiation (β=.74; p<.01) and cost industries were previously identified as examples of low leadership (β=.75; p<.01). The results also provide strong and high commodity environments (e.g., Hambrick 1983; support for the effects of differentiation (β=.41; p<.01) and Narver and Slater 1990; Stanton and Herbst 2005). We used cost leadership (β=.52; p<.01) on performance. Finally, the this precedence to assign firms to two subgroups. The low R2 value of the performance variable (68%) indicated that commodity subgroup (n1 =218) included firms from phar- the model highlights important factors associated with the maceuticals, underwear, outerwear, wearing apparel and success of firms. accessories, furniture, and toys. The high commodity A supplementary test for mediation assessed the signifi- subgroup (n2 = 100) was composed of energy supply, cance of the two indirect effects, CRM→differentiation→ mining, forestry and logging, and agriculture and hunting. performance and CRM→cost leadership→performance To confirm the appropriateness of the assignment of firms (MacKinnon et al. 2002). Estimating a single model that to the two subgroups, a t-test was performed, with industry included both the hypothesized indirect paths and the direct commoditization as the differentiating factor. This test path (CRM→performance), we find that the indirect confirmed a significantly lower level of industry commodi- associations are significant (indirect effect via differentia- tization for the low versus high industry commoditization tion: βindirect =.27; p<.01; indirect effect via cost leadership subgroup (df=316; p<.01). βindirect =.33; p <.01),3 while the direct association is The results for the structural model from two different subsamples, one from low and the other from high industry commoditization, appear in Fig. 2. We initially tested for measurement invariance by equating the factor 3 To obtain the standard errors for the indirect effects, we used the loadings in the two groups (Steenkamp and Baumgartner Sobel (1982) method. 1998). Examining the effect of this constraint, we found
  12. 12. J. of the Acad. Mark. Sci. (2010) 38:326–346 337 Y1 Y7 Customer Y8 .74** .41** Y9 satisfaction Differentiation Y10 * 4* .8 Y11 .98** Market Y12 X1 CRM Performance effectiveness Y13 Y14 .75** .52** R 2=.68 Y15 .9 Cost Leadership 2* Y16 Profitability * Y17 Y18 Y2 Y3 Y4 Y5 Y6 Notes: *p < .05, **p < .01. X1 and Y1 represent factor scores obtained through PLS. Figure 1 Results for the structural model of CRM, differentiation, cost leadership, and performance. that it did not lead to a significant decrease in model fit high commodity industries. For the indirect effect CRM→ ( χ2 =19.95; df=13; p>.05), which supports measure- differentiation→performance, the t-value based on the ment equivalence. Subsequently, we compared the struc- Smith-Satterthwaite test is 1.40, and for the indirect effect tural path estimates for the low and high commodity CRM→cost leadership→performance, the t-value is 1.02. subsamples. Thus, both indirect effects are not statistically different between the low and high commodity subgroups (p>.05). Comparison of low and high commodity industries In line with H3, CRM’s impact on differentiation was significantly greater in high commodity industries (β=.81, p<.01) than Discussion in low commodity industries (β=.70, p<.01); equating this path in the two submodels led to a significant decrease in For nearly three decades, the ideas of Porter (1980, 1985) model fit ( χ2 =4.99; df=1; p<.05). However, the have been highly influential to our understanding of the impact of CRM on cost leadership remained virtually way in which firms compete. Particularly, the concepts of unchanged (resulting in no support for H4); constraining differentiation and cost leadership have had an immense the model in a way that the path from CRM to cost impact on business practice and research (Acquaah and Yasai- leadership was equal did not produce a significant change Ardekani 2008). Porter and others (e.g., Kotha and in the fit statistics ( χ2 =.05; df=1; p>.1).4 The paths Vadlamani 1995; Miller and Dess 1993) assert, and empirical from differentiation to performance and from cost leader- evidence supports, that differentiation and cost leadership are ship to performance were positive and significant (p<.01) fundamental to business strategy and that these focuses can in both subsamples, without significant differences (p>.05) be linked to business success. between the two groups. Virtually detached from the Porter tradition, a different While not at the center of our research interest, we also camp of CRM advocates has recently emerged. Proponents tested for differences between low and high commodity of CRM are arguing that CRM is a new marketing industries in terms of the total indirect effects CRM→ paradigm and is evolving as part of marketing’s new differentiation → performance and CRM → cost leader- dominant logic. Yet, one major problem stands in their ship→performance, applying MacKinnon’s (2000) proce- way. Anecdotal evidence from business practices does not dures to contrasting indirect effects. That is, we calculated fully support a strong link between CRM and business estimates and standard deviations for the indirect paths for performance. In addition, research analyzing the effect of the low and high commodity subgroups and performed CRM on performance has produced inconclusive results. Smith-Satterthwaite tests to assess statistical significance of Some investigators contend that, without prompt attention the difference between the indirect effects in low versus to its performance impact and conceptual anchoring, CRM could become abandoned and perhaps experience a prema- ture death (Fournier et al. 1998). This is the backdrop in which this study attempts to 4 Because our analysis of moderating effects with multi-group analysis make a contribution and provide clarity. To address this was based on the dichotomization of the moderator variable, it may be issue, we focused on embedding CRM within the business associated with a reduced level of statistical power (Irwin and McClelland 2001), which could also serve as an explanation for why strategy of the organization. In doing so, we heeded prior we do not find support for H4. calls for research integrating CRM with organizational
  13. 13. 338 J. of the Acad. Mark. Sci. (2010) 38:326–346 Coefficients for low industry commoditization/ high industry commoditization Customer .70**/.81** .50**/.23* 6* / satisfaction .8 3** Differentiation * .8 .97**/ .99** Market CRM Performance effectiveness .74**/.76** .49**/.62** R 2=.74/.62 .9 5** Cost Leadership 1* .9 */ Profitability Notes: *p < .05, **p < .01. Figure 2 Results for low and high industry commoditization. strategy (Sawhney and Zabin 2002) and examining funda- best of our knowledge, this is the first empirical study to mental mechanisms through which CRM affects firm investigate critical mediators in the CRM-performance link performance (Shugan 2005; Zablah et al. 2004). In taking as well as to examine CRM in the context of business this approach, we tackle two important questions: (1) What strategies. is the role of CRM for business strategy and firm performance? and (2) Does industry commoditization affect Does industry commoditization affect the impact of CRM? the impact of CRM? As the commoditization phenomenon grows more exten- What is the role of CRM for business strategy and firm sive (Olson and Sharma 2008; Rangan and Bowman 1992; performance? Sharma and Sheth 2004), understanding performance drivers in the high commoditization environment and The inconclusive findings of prior research present a whether these drivers differ from those in less commodi- conundrum with respect to the importance and effect of tized industries becomes increasingly important. From this CRM. On the basis of the conceptual model tested and research, we learn that industry commoditization may supported in this study, we argue that an explanation for the significantly affect the extent to which CRM enhances role of CRM lies in the sources→positions→performance performance-improving strategies. The caveat is that the framework, which asserts that organizational capabilities moderating influence of commoditization depends on the are the sources of strategic positions, which in turn improve business strategy being analyzed. We arrive at this caveat firm performance (Day and Wensley 1988). From this because we find support for H3 (i.e., the relationship perspective, CRM represents a critical capability of the firm between CRM and differentiation is stronger if industry used to enhance its strategic position in the market. With commoditization is high than if industry commoditization is this enhanced position, improved performance outcomes low), but did not find support for H4 which hypothesized a are achieved. In line with Day and Wensley (1988), the stronger association between CRM and cost leadership in specific strategic positions investigated in this study include higher versus lower commodity environments. differentiation and cost leadership. Thus, the sources→ The lack of support for H4 was unexpected because we positions→performance framework helps to advance our deduced that the threat of customer migration was relatively theoretical understanding of how CRM is linked to business lower in less commoditized industries because of character- strategies and of the process by which CRM contributes to istics that are typical of those environments (e.g., higher an organization’s success. switching costs and less price sensitivity). Therefore, we Supporting this theory, the critical insight we glean from expected the positive effect of CRM on customer replace- our empirical results is that the CRM-performance link is ment costs to be more moderate in low commodity markets. fully mediated by the strategies of differentiation and cost In other words, the impact of CRM on costs improvements leadership. In other words, the link between CRM and firm would be larger in an environment where customer performance is not direct, but rather indirect. On the basis migration is a bigger concern. However, counter to our of this finding, we conclude that prior CRM research was rationale, the results suggest that CRM has an equivalently not incorrect, but rather was incomplete in that it focused strong effect on cost leadership regardless of the degree of exclusively on the direct effect of CRM. By adopting a industry commoditization. This result could lead one to mediational structure in this study, we isolate the specific wonder whether customer migration costs are key to a cost processes by which CRM links to firm performance. To the leadership position in the context of our study. It could be

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