Bio2003 lit searching nov 2013

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  • EVERYONE PLEASE LOG ON, OPEN FIREFOX AND LOG IN TO UNIHUB.
    HAND OUT THE KEYWORDS SHEETS (1 between 2)
  • EVERYONE PLEASE FACE THE FRONT FOR 2 MINUTES (NOT COMPUTERS).
    BEFORE next slide, ask students: Can tell me some key features of journals? What are they?
  • GIVE STUDENTS 1-2 MINUTES TO DISCUSS THE TASK IN PAIRS.
    TAKE FEEDBACK.
    THEN PASS ROUND 3 EXAMPLES OF DIFFERENT PRINT JOURNALS FOR EVERYONE TO LOOK AT DURING THE LESSON.
  • Ask students: How is it different to Google? (i.e: it aims to index academic articles only).
    SHOW STUDENTS LIVE: Link Google Scholar to Middlesex, to pick up full-text info. Go to Settings > Library links > Search for Middlesex University. (N.B. This may happen automatically on campus, but they will need to set it up themselves at home.)
    STUDENTS NOW FIND GOOGLE SCHOLAR AND ALL TRY SOME SEARCHES, USING THEIR KEYWORDS HANDOUTS (Note different keywords for students on different programmes).
    STUDENTS CAN SEARCH IN PAIRS IN THEY LIKE.
    TAKE FEEDBACK ON GOOGLE SCHOLAR.
  • STUDENTS ALL FOLLOW THIS PATH NOW
    Explain why UniHub login is essential
  • ASK: Does anyone the difference between Summon and the Library Catalogue? (Hold up a print journal to explain that Summon searches the Catalogue resources plus the full-text of our e-resources, inc. journal articles.)
    STUDENTS NOW TRY SOME SEARCHES, USING THEIR KEYWORDS HANDOUTS (IN PAIRS IN THEY LIKE).
    TAKE FEEDBACK ON SUMMON, and HOW DOES IT COMPARE TO GOOGLE SCHOLAR?. (Pros of Summon: Covers all e-resources at once, A good starting point, Has some options for refining search. Cons: Searching is not as detailed as on journal databases we will see next).
  • POINT OUT THAT: Some databases will not provide direct access to full-text articles, but will still let you know about important articles on your subject – we’ll cover this later...
    ASK BEFORE NEXT SLIDE: Does anyone know what peer reviewed means?
  • If you want to Sshow an example of a peer reviewed journal, put up the website for the journal PLOS One: http://www.plosone.org/static/information;jsessionid=76EECD099008A3E565A9BABA1162E749
  • STUDENTS ALL FOLLOW THIS PATH NOW
    NOTE THAT: The Environmental Health students’ guide is called Public Health, Risk, Safety & Environment
  • ARE THE ARTICLES IN THESE DATABASES PEER REVIEWED?
    SCIENCE CITATION INDEX (WEB OF SCIENCE) – All journals are peer reviewed, see: http://wokinfo.com/publisher_relations/journals/
    SCIENCE DIRECT - All journals are peer reviewed (It tells you at the top of the home page)
    MEDLINE – All journals go through a rigorous selection process before being accepted for the database. See this Fact sheet: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/factsheets/jsel.html
  • STUDENTS TRY IT FOR 5 MINUTES (USE SAME KEYWORDS ON HANDOUTS).
    GO ROUND AND ANSWER QUESTIONS
    TAKE FEEDBACK FROM WHOLE CLASS.
  • STUDENTS TRY IT FOR 5 MINUTES (USE SAME KEYWORDS ON HANDOUTS).
    GO ROUND AND ANSWER QUESTIONS
    TAKE FEEDBACK FROM WHOLE CLASS.
  • STUDENTS TRY IT FOR 5 MINUTES (USE SAME KEYWORDS ON HANDOUTS).
    GO ROUND AND ANSWER QUESTIONS
    TAKE FEEDBACK FROM WHOLE CLASS.
  • DEMO: Search the Library Catalogue for this journal article: Schoefs, B. (2004). Determination of pigments in vegetables. Journal of chromatography A. 1054, (1-2), p. 217-226.
    Show them how to navigate right through to the full-text.
    Students can do it with you if they like, or just watch.
  • STUDENTS now try this one themselves.
    Take feedback, and run through on screen if necessary.
  • *** DON’T FORGET TO COLLECT THE PRINT JOURNALS BACK IN!! ***
  • Bio2003 lit searching nov 2013

    1. 1. BIO2003 Postgraduate Course Feedback Literature searching November 2013
    2. 2. Today we will cover… • How to access and use journal databases • How to search effectively to find relevant articles • How to access the articles you have found in full-text
    3. 3. What is a journal? • Similar format to a magazine • Published regularly • Focuses on a particular academic discipline • Contains articles by different authors • Also contains book reviews & editorials
    4. 4. What is in a journal database? • • This is an example of a record from the database Medline. Can you find these pieces of information in the record? Journal Title, Issue, Article title, Volume, Page Numbers, Date, Author/s • Is there an Abstract available? (What is an Abstract?)
    5. 5. Quick ways to find journal articles: 1) Google Scholar
    6. 6. Quick ways to find journal articles: 2) Summon MyUniHub My Study My Library Summon
    7. 7. Quick ways to find journal articles: 2) Summon
    8. 8. Journal databases • The chance to search a collection of journals that is specifically for your subject/s • More options to refine your search results • Journals are usually all peer-reviewed
    9. 9. Peer review • A formal procedure for checking the quality of research before it is published. • If a publication is peer reviewed it means it has been read, checked and authenticated by independent, third party academics (peers). • The quality-control system of academic publishing for hundreds of years.
    10. 10. Accessing journal databases MyUniHub My Study My Library Library subject guides (choose your guide) Resources tab Finding journal articles / Using databases
    11. 11. Key databases Web of Science (Science Citation Index) The leading science and technical journals Science Direct Elsevier’s excellent online journal package Medline The premier biomedical database
    12. 12. A few search tips… • Look for an ‘Advanced search’ page • Use specific keywords (not long sentences) and combine them in separate search boxes. e.g. flood AND policy
    13. 13. A few search tips… • Try synonyms for your keywords e.g. congenital malformation / birth defects • To search for a phrase, use “ ” e.g. “climate change” • To find different word endings, use * e.g. flood* (finds flood, floods, flooding)
    14. 14. Web of Science (Science Citation Index) Choose only the databases that are relevant:
    15. 15. Science Direct To get full-text only: Choose Advanced Search, then the Journals tab Select Subscribed journals and Open Access articles Select 2003 to present
    16. 16. Medline
    17. 17. Have we got access to the full-text? • A link to the full-text article may appear. • If it does not, go to the Library Catalogue and do an A-Z Search for the journal title.
    18. 18. Have we got access to the full-text? Search the Library Catalogue to see if we have access to the full-text of this article:
    19. 19. If we do not have access… • Go to My Study > My Library > Inter-Library Loans, log in and complete a request form • You will receive a PDF link to the article via email • Takes 1-2 weeks. • There is a charge of £3 for this service
    20. 20. Other libraries • Sconul Access Scheme http://www.sconul.ac.uk/using_other_libraries/ac • British Library http://www.bl.uk/
    21. 21. Referencing
    22. 22. Referencing
    23. 23. Need help? • Librarians in the Specialist Zone (1st floor) 11-3 Monday – Friday (on call 9-11, 3-5) • Ask a Librarian http://askalibrarian.mdx.ac.uk/ • BMS Library Subject Guide http://libguides.mdx.ac.uk/biomedicalsciences

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