"What today's university students have taught us"

128 views

Published on

A keynote by Alison Head, Director of Project Information Literacy, for the Creating Knowledge VII conference, Reykjavik, Iceland on June 5, 2016.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
128
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

"What today's university students have taught us"

  1. 1. What today’s university students have taught us Alison J. Head, Ph.D., Director, Project Information Literacy University of Washington Information School | USA 5 June 2016 | Creating Knowledge Conference, Reykjavik, Iceland
  2. 2. Instruct Advise Train Develop Promote Discuss Practice Advance Study Information Literacy
  3. 3. Articles and books published ALONE since 2015 Search of all databases at University of Washington Libraries, “information literacy,” 18 May 2016
  4. 4. Source: Top 50 most relevant books and peer-reviewed articles from search, 18 May 2016
  5. 5. What can we learn from students?
  6. 6. 2008 n = 86 2009 n = 2,318 2010 n = 8,353 n = 191 Focus groups Online survey/ Library content analysis interviews 2011 n = 560 Eight studies 15,000 students, 63 US campuses Passage studies 2012 2013 2016 n = 23 n = 35 n = 126 n = 33 n = 1,941 n = 1,651 Online survey Workplace Freshmen Lifelong Overview of findings? http://tinyurl.com/lg7fryh Finding Evaluating/using Multitasking Transitioning
  7. 7. 5 Takeaways About Information Literacy that Inform Assessment and Evaluation
  8. 8. #1 Students say research is more difficult than ever before.
  9. 9. Adjectives that describe how you feel when you get a research assignment . . . fear, angst, tired, dread, excited, anxious, annoyed, stressed, disgusted, intrigued, confused, and overwhelmed. 2009, n = 86 | 7 campuses
  10. 10. #2 Getting started is the hardest part of course research.
  11. 11. Task Definition Search Using information Task definition Search Self assessment 69% 41% 30% 25% Defining and choosing topics is most difficult 2010 Survey, n = 8353 | 25 campuses Defining a topic Narrowing a topic
  12. 12. #3 Frustrations begin with finding context.
  13. 13. Information need Course research Everyday life Research 1. Big Picture Summary, background Almost always Often 2. Information Gathering Locating relevant sources Often Sometimes Modeling the search for context PIL’s Context Typology
  14. 14. Information need Course research Everyday life Research 3. Language Meaning of words, terms Sometimes Sometimes 4. Situational How far to go, surrounding circumstances Sometimes Sometimes PIL’s Context Typology Modeling the search for context
  15. 15. #4 Search – strategy of predictability, familiarity, and efficiency.
  16. 16. Meet Jon • Risk-averse, plays it safe • In search of “the answer” • Needs to appear self-sufficient • Waits until the last minute
  17. 17. Instructor’s handout Course readings Google and Wikipedia JSTOR ABI Inform Instructors Satisficing Treads a well-worn path Situational/ information gathering contexts Big picture/ language contexts
  18. 18. 1. Majority recommend a “place-based source” (60%) 2. Few recommended consulting librarians (13%) 3. Few defined what “research” is or means (16%) 2010 Handout Study, n = 191 handouts | 28 campuses “Instructors are my research coaches” But assignment handouts . . .
  19. 19. 2016 Staying Smart, n = 1,651 recent graduates from 10 US After graduation: “Google is the Internet to me” 79% 51% 21% 18% 14% 12% 10% 9% 7% 5% 3% 3% 2% 1% 1% 0% 25% 50% 75% 100% YouTube Pinterest Duolingo Khan Academy Coursera Stack Overflow Codecademy Google Helpouts lynda edX Udemy CrashCourse Udacity Academic Earth ALISON
  20. 20. #5 Evaluation is the one information literacy skill students learn to use.
  21. 21. 77% 73% 71% 71% 66% 62% 62% 61% 59% 59% 54% 25% 0% 25% 50% 75% 100% Currency (e.g., publication date) Author’s credentials URL (e.g., Web domain) Interface design External linkage (if links exist) Familiarity from previous use Heard about site before Chart quality (if they exist) Author credits others for ideas Different viewpoints… Bibliography included Mentioned by librarian Evaluation criteria: Coursework 2010 Truth Be Told survey, n = 8353 | 25 campuses
  22. 22. Evaluation criteria: After graduation 2015 Staying Smart survey, n = 1651 | 10 US campuses 97% 94% 92% 89% 88% 86% 84% 75% 72% 58% 0% 25% 50% 75% 100% How up-to-date the information is What the author's credentials are Site is familiar from previous use Site design conveys legitimacy URL is from a legitimate source, e.g., gov or edu Site links to other resources Someone has recommended using the site Charts add important information (if they exist) Gut feeling says site is legitimate Site is familiar from college
  23. 23. PIL Finding Solutions Defining a topic is harder than finding sources. • Fewer lessons on “search,” more on formulating students’ own questions • Embed librarians within courses Using same sources, many come from secondary school assignments. • Teach abstracts, teach synthesis • Learning how to “tie it all together” as essential university skills Evaluating online sources using a variety of different criteria. • Work closely with educators K-12 • Next step: Teaching students how to ask their own questions How can PIL’s research inform solutions?
  24. 24. What today’s university students have taught us Alison J. Head, Ph.D., Director, Project Information Literacy |University of Washington Information School alison@projectinfolit.org | http://projectinfolit.org 5 June 2016 | Creating Knowledge Conference, Reykjavik, Iceland

×