Girls, sports, and college

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  • Girls that rated their self-esteem 5 and under 35.7% played sports and 71.4% said they plan to attend college right after high school. Girls that rated their self-esteem over 5 played sports 48.4% and 71% plan to attend college after high school.

Transcript

  • 1. Girls, Sports, and College
    Alisia Ketchum
    Gender Roles
    March 16, 2009
  • 2. Background
    When girls enter adolescent their IQ and self-esteem drop
    Girls participate at a much lower rate than boys in sport activities
    The Educational Act of 1972 was to stop sexual discrimination in public schools, including equal funding for sports
    Girls still report that they believe more funding is given to male sports
    24.5% of boys reported playing sports was a positive thing about being a boy whereas girls reported it as a negative thing about being a girl
    1/3 to ½ girls reported that they did not participate in physical activity other than the required physical education
  • 3. Positive Benefits for Girls to Play Sports
    Higher Self-Esteem
    Supportive Peer Relationships
    Lower Rates of Sexual Activity
    Enhanced Social Skills
    Higher Academic Achievements
    Less Likely to Use Drugs, Alcohol, or Smoke
    Positive Attitudes on Life
  • 4. Hypothesis
    Girls that participate in high school sports have higher self-esteem rates that will motivate them to attend college.
  • 5. Methods
    A survey method was used to gather information from 50 high school girls. Random girls were asked to participate. Participants were found at the local mall, movie theater, and the grocery store. I also received help from a girl that attends Capital High School. She was instructed to ask girls from all different social group, not just her friends.
    What School Do You Attend?
    What Grade Are You In?
    Do You Play Sports? If Yes Please List
    Do You Plan On Attending College? If Yes, Right After High School?
    Do Your Parents Encourage You To Play Sports?
    Do Your Parents Encourage You To Go To College?
    In A Scale 1-10 How Would You Rate Your Self-Esteem?
  • 6. ResultsDiversity of Girls
  • 7. Overall Results
  • 8. Final Results
    Girls that rated their self-esteem 5 and under 35.7% played sports and 71.4% said they plan to attend college right after high school.
    Girls that rated their self-esteem over 5 played sports 48.4% and 71% plan to attend college after high school.
  • 9. Conclusion
    My results do not support my hypothesis
    Girls did report higher self esteem that played sports but their was very little change if they wanted to attend college right after high-school
    Some girls may have been more academic even though not involved in sports, therefore would still want to go to college and lack of social activities could effect self-esteem
    There could have been some problems with having girls measure their own self-esteem, they may have changed their results if they thought their friends would see
  • 10. Encouraging Equality
    Teachers can encourage equality by having the same expectations for both boys and girls to participate in the classroom and after school activities. This would show students that boys and girls are more similar than different.
    Parents also need to treat their daughters and sons equally. They should both be encouraged to be active and healthy.
  • 11. References
    Kimmel, Michael. 2008. The Gendered Society. Third Edition. New York. New York Oxford
    Zittleman, Karen. 2006. Being a Girl and Being a Boy: Voices of a Middle Schooler. Paper presented at the Annual American Educational Research Association