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Video for social change so just workshop by ali pinschmidt

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  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=gluKuCZF2D8
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=l5SaXY-fpgE

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=8Xm15nxxdNQ
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  • Transcript

    • 1. Video for Social Change Ali Pinschmidt alipinschmidt@yahoo.com alipinschmidt.wordpress.com
    • 2. goals of this Workshop Learn ways that video can be used for change Learn about successful video models Acquire practical tips for filming higher quality videos Understand essentials for planning a video with social change goals Get suggestions for free online resources and inexpensive equipment
    • 3. Why it’s important for socially conscious individuals and change-makers to create media - American media is omnipresent - Who creates the media influences the type of media it is - The Bechdel test - Your voice and messages are needed
    • 4. Social Change  Changes in beliefs/values and behaviors of society over time, through individuals and groups in society  Leads to structural changes  such as laws, institutions, and what is considered a norm  Moving towards social justice, economic justice, environmental justice, etc.  Moving towards equity/equality and fairness  Moving towards a higher quality of life  What moves people towards social change?  Education and information  personal experience  role models  pressure:  social pressure, legal pressure, financial pressure, political pressure  What else?
    • 5. Why Video?  What made you want to take this workshop?  Power of video:  Can humanize people and issues, tap into emotions – can portray a reality  Can compress time and space  Spread information widely and quickly  Breaks literacy and language barriers  Can document or provide proof  We believe it has authority
    • 6. Drawbacks / Limitations of Video  Technology can be a barrier, especially as it requires:  Availability of equipment  Maintenance  Training  Costs can be prohibitive  Can be manipulated or distorted; (arguably there is no objective media)  Can be threatening  As with any tool, can be used in ways that are harmful, disruptive, dangerous  One video doesn’t necessarily cater to all audiences  What else?
    • 7. Change Points  The information in the video  The process of making the video, or the power dynamics within it’s making  Audience Engagement - Action taken after the video is watched
    • 8. stages of Making a Video  Pre-production: planning stage  Deciding your goals  Making a plan  Writing your treatment or storyboard  Production: filming  Filming all your action shots and interviews  Post-production: editing  Editing with video editing software  Distribution and Outreach  Getting your video to people to watch  Audience Engagement  Getting people to take action
    • 9. what makes for a Good Video? Content - Information it conveys Delivery - How skillfully its made Models of video Talk to camera Showing something through video
    • 10. Video for Social Change: Models & Examples - Don’t Reinvent the Reel - Take advantage of films already made - Host film screenings - Use in conjunction with a campaign - Build online community or discussion around the film - Sell the film as fundraiser - All of course, with permission from the filmmaker Starting with the Most Basic…
    • 11. - Google+ Hangouts - Video Documentation of your events - Google+ Hangout software - Community Supported Film hangout - Filmed Event
    • 12. online video Blogs about social issues  Link to video It Gets Better project
    • 13. Best Camera Practices  Keep the camera still – use a tripod, monopod, table, or support yourself  Resist the temptation to zoom and pan a lot  Make sure your background relates to the theme – mise en scene  Film in a quiet place and use microphones  Film with good lighting, no backlighting  Hold your camera steady for the shots, and hold for at least 5-10 seconds – can shorten in editing  Keep your video short!
    • 14. How-to Videos, or positive example Occupy the mail
    • 15. challenging Culture – bringing Taboo subjects into public discourse & questioning the status quo-  The r word  I am a Survivor of Rape
    • 16. interviewing  Get consent and informed consent  Make your subject comfortable  Choose your questions carefully to relate to your exact subject  If you’re doing a short film, keep your interviews short too  Good sound – use lapel mic, and /or film in a quiet place  Interview in a place that relates to your subject  Depth and interesting but not distracting visuals behind  Consider interviewing them while doing a related action
    • 17. Visual story-telling: constructing Reality for the viewer Images create meaning Try to replicate the personal and human experience of reality through your films Mise en scene – “placing on stage”
    • 18. planning creative Shots Shoot the action itself, up close and personal Ie – chopping, digging, typing, writing, drumming Face of person doing action Medium shot – torso and head, or maybe more Wide shot or behind shot Contextualizes where the person is POV shot – point of view shot Reaction shot
    • 19. rule of Thirds
    • 20. It comes together in the editing…
    • 21. learn by Watching!
    • 22. best STORY practices Try to tell the larger story through the personal example Choose a really interesting “character” (subject) Including for documentary/non- fiction films Keep it short and simple Especially when you start out Editing takes a very long time!
    • 23. challenging Stereotypes, giving new information  Ex - muslim woman skateboarder Maryama: Skateboarder
    • 24. video to Promote a good Cause Toxic soil busters
    • 25. Activist videos that inform and call for action Compelling story Slick /professional video Simplified a complex issue which we tend to like, but is also problematic Simple and direct requests and action steps Invisible Children
    • 26. Social Issue Films with Audience Engagement Campaigns The film helps viewers - potential supporters, activists, stakeholders - internalize the issue visually and emotionally Then the campaign provides audience members easy ways to take action on the issue  Fledgling Fund  Working Films  Participant Media
    • 27. Often are web-based campaigns for movies, like Blue Vinyl or No Impact Man.
    • 28. Video Bridges Process and product oriented Video mediated communication between groups “Upward” communication Video Bridge Project about Dropping out of Highschool Question Bridge Video postcards between youth in different places Video Intervention Used in a hospital in Boston
    • 29. Participatory video  People telling their own stories or the stories of their own communities  Those who are often not the media makers become the media makers  Process and product oriented  Press Pass TV  Reel Grrls  Community Supported Film
    • 30. Witness, evidence, visual proof Video that captures or documents abuses or illegal activity, either intentionally or by chance  Witness Video as a Tool for Development  Research  People testifying to environmental changes in Somoa  Monitoring and Evaluation  Insight share  Video Proposals - Insight share  Video for Record Keeping and documentation  Video for self-feedback or group-feedback  Can be used in training of teachers, counselors, etc. to watch selves and analyze from third person perspective.
    • 31. Remember: the stages of Making a Video  Pre-production: planning stage  Deciding your goals  Making a plan  Writing your treatment or storyboard  Production: filming  Filming all your action shots and interviews  Post-production: editing  Editing with video editing software  Distribution  Getting your video to people to watch  Audience Engagement  Getting people to take action
    • 32. Pre-Production for Change Goals  What is your message?  What is your goal?  And is it SMART? Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Timebound?  Who is your primary audience?  Who or what will this audience listen to?  What type of change are you trying to achieve?  What do you want your audience to do?  Consumer change?  Behavioral change?  Have a new awareness, or know about a particular resource?  Political change?  Become a part of a movement?
    • 33. further Pre-production planning How and when will your primary audiences see this video? What is your realistic capacity and what are your resources for this project? Research – has this already been done? Who will your key strategic partners be? Those who would LOVE to get this video out to their networks Get them onboard early on
    • 34. decide what Type of video to make Fiction (narrative) Nonfiction Get creative: animation silent film music video experimental
    • 35. Pre-production planning for the video itself  Writing a treatment, script, or storyboard
    • 36. Distribution Strategy How will you get your video out to people so they know about it and watch it? - Internet - How will you get people to see it? - Have your partners and networks spread the word - Work with organizations and relevant groups to use - Screenings – find your specific audience - Sell your DVD, put in libraries - Conferences, festivals, related events
    • 37. Audience Engagement Strategy - What specific action steps will you ask of your audience? - Petition - Pledge - Vote - Organize - Activity - Screening - How will you make it easy for them? - How will you measure impact?
    • 38. Student example - Advocacy Video  Freud is Watching You: and Clark Recycles : Recycling Campaign Videos for Clark University  And
    • 39. Student Project non-fiction positive example Fat Cat: The Trouble with Pet Obesity
    • 40. let’s try making a video plan Identify the issue you want to address and the message you want to convey Identify the primary audience who can make a difference around this issue Decide what you want to tell or show your audience that will be interesting and give new insight What action you want your audience to take, or what do you want to change? Decide what type of video you’ll make and create a video plan: draw a storyboard or write your treatment
    • 41. good cheap EQUIPMENT  Cameras  Kodak zi8  Has mic input  Canon Vixia  Many types of a range of budgets  Microphones  Lapel Mic – AudioTechnica ATR3350  Rhode Video mic shotgun  Monopod, tripod  Fluid heads are better quality  External Hard Drive  Editing software  Windows movie maker – free and basic  iMovie – free and basic  Corel video studio Pro  Final Cut X
    • 42. resources  For affordable training or services:  Public Access Stations  Boston Neighorhood Network  Cambridge Community TV  Adult and Community Education  Film and Video Meetup Groups  Film school interns  Press Pass TV  Written Resources  Witness – Video for Change online book  Working Films  Fledgling Fund  Center for Social Media
    • 43. getting involved with VIDEO PROGRAMS Community Supported Film PressPass TV Global Potential Powered by Girl – Media criticism Girls Make Movies – Girls Leadership Institute Video Vanguards, Youth Action Coalition
    • 44. In review: Video models for Change Tell YOUR story, or a personal story of someone YOU know Video blogging – especially for a common cause Challenge stereotypes Explore taboo subjects and question the status quo How-to videos Positive example videos Promote a good cause Call people to action
    • 45. In review – planning for impact Identify your main message Choose your audience Identify what change or action you want to happen Collaborate with partners Plan your story on paper first
    • 46. In Review: video Basics to remember Keep camera still and hold your shots Get numerous shots – close, medium, far, side, behind, and reaction shots Frame your subjects well using rule of thirds Capture clear audio Film in good lighting and don’t backlight your subject
    • 47. Thank you! alipinschmidt@yahoo.com alipinschmidt.wordpress.com www.csfilm.org