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  • 1. Ph.D. Manual Consumer Economics and Environmental Design Consumer Economics Emphasis Division of Personal Financial Planning Texas Tech University September 2004 1
  • 2. Ph.D. Program Policies Table of Contents Ph.D. Admissions..............................................................................................................3 Program Policies ...............................................................................................................4 Course Work .....................................................................................................................5 List of Classes ..................................................................................................................5 Transfer Credit Policy........................................................................................................6 Selecting A Dissertation Committee..................................................................................7 Change of Advisor/Committee Dissertation ......................................................................7 Comprehensive Exam .......................................................................................................7 Possible Outcomes ...........................................................................................................8 Guidelines for Research....................................................................................................9 Final Examination............................................................................................................10 Recommended Statistics and Research Methods Courses ............................................12 Guideline for Authorship and Use of Data.......................................................................13 Authorship .......................................................................................................................13 Ownership of Data ..........................................................................................................13 Major Steps in the Ph.D. Program ..................................................................................14 2
  • 3. Ph.D. Program Policies Ph.D. Admissions Application Process For best opportunity of acceptance into the Ph.D. program, application deadlines are April 1 for Summer and Fall start and October 15 for Spring start. Application deadlines for the Ph.D. program are February 1 for scholarship and fellowship opportunities. Application Materials and Criteria Admission to the CEED Ph.D. program specializing in Personal Financial Planning (PFP) is based on a comprehensive review of information submitted rather than any single factor. Decisions are based on a comprehensive review of the following criteria: • Undergraduate degree from an accredited institution, • GPA from undergraduate and graduate degree programs, • GRE or GMAT scores, • TOEFL scores (international students only), • Copies of official transcripts, • Three letters of recommendation (Preferably from both academic and industry sources) • Writing Sample: Personal statement consisting of the following: o Identify the area of financial planning in which you would be interested in developing a specialization. Where would you like to be career wise in five years? o Identify your major research interests. How do you expect to expand that into a dissertation? Be sure to discuss grant funding, data availability, and possible outlets for publication and presentation. o What assets and strengths do you bring with you into your desired program? (Include educational experiences in addition to practical experiences). • Campus and/or telephone interview • Unique contribution as evidenced in applicant's resume or vita: o Special accomplishments in industry or academic pursuits, o Leadership experience and potential, o Other unique life experiences relevant to the pursuit of a graduate degree. 3
  • 4. Program Policies Philosophy Statement The Ph.D. program is designed to prepare graduates for careers as effective university researchers and teachers or for senior research positions in a variety of settings. It is necessary that scholars have a solid background in theory and practice, as well as an established research record. Therefore, the program is designed so that course work is heavily weighted toward research activities such as research design, theoretical modeling, literature review and critique, and preparation of proposals and research papers. Candidates for the doctoral degree must demonstrate extensive scholarship, expertise in a particular field of knowledge, and the ability to conduct independent investigation and present the results of their research in a dissertation format. Ph.D. Program Committees • Ph.D. Program Advisor: PFP Ph.D. Program Advisor oversees the procedures in the Ph.D. program. This includes handling applications and admission procedures, scholarship and assistantship recommendations, assigning temporary mentor, chairing the Program Advisory Committee, and administering the comprehensive exam. • Temporary Mentor: The Temporary Mentor will supervise and advise Ph.D. students until they select their major advisors (dissertation committee chair). • Program Advisory Committee: The Program Advisory Committee will handle Ph.D. curriculum, admission decision making, and degree plans. • Major Advisor (Dissertation Committee Chair): The Major Advisor will chair the Dissertation Committee. • Dissertation Committee: The Dissertation Committee will provide guidance as students move from design of their study to gathering information, analysis, and preparation of drafts and revisions. Temporary Mentor and Degree Plan Meeting The PFP Program Advisor assigns a temporary mentor who is a graduate faculty member approved for direction of Ph.D. students to guide the student until the major advisor for the program of study and research is selected. After the first 9 hours of course work, students will request a degree plan meeting with the temporary advisor. The temporary mentor will coordinate the meeting with the Program Advisory Committee to plan the student’s program of study. Supplementary materials from the student are needed to assist the committee in developing the student's program of study. These materials are turned in to the temporary mentor when the student requests the meeting. Supplementary materials include the following: a list of previously completed graduate level courses 4
  • 5. along with a copy of current class schedule and syllabi from previous coursework (if required by the committee). Graduate Program Liaison The Ph.D. Program Advisor serves as the liaison with the Graduate School and the graduate students. The Ph.D. Program Advisor implements policies recommended by the Graduate School and adopted by the faculty. Students are responsible for understanding and following rules and guidelines in the Ph.D. Student Manual and the TTU Graduate School Catalog. Course Work TimeLine Full-time students who enter the graduate program with few deficiencies should be able to complete a Ph.D. degree in a minimum of three years if following a plan of study similar to the one shown below. This plan presumes that the student enters during a fall semester, becomes focused on a research direction early in the program, and consistently pursues research activities. Students can expect the time frame to be extended if they enter with 12 or more credits of deficiency coursework and a non-thesis master’s degree or no master’s degree, enter during the spring semester, change research direction in mid- program, fail to pass the comprehensive exam, or require extra time to complete the research process. List of Classes ** Core Courses CEED 5301 Graduate Research Seminar CEED 5307 Internship CEED 5310 Readings CEED 5385 Case Studies (Doctoral Seminar I) CEED 5311 Individual Study in CEED (Doctoral Seminar II) CEED 5375 Current Consumer Issues CEED 6383 Regulatory Policy Consumer Economics/Personal Financial Planning Courses CEED 5362 Asset Management I CEED 5371 Advanced Per Fin Planning CEED 5372 Asset Management II CEED 5373 Prof. Practice in PFP CEED 5374 Family Economics CEED 5376 Family and Individual Consumption Behavior CEED 5394 Ret. Plan. & Employ Benefit CEED 5395 Advanced Risk Management CEED 5397 Life Insurance Planning CEED 5398 Advanced Estate Planning ACCT 5311 Income Tax Accounting Bolded courses required -- Registered by the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, Inc. 5
  • 6. List of Classes (cont.) Tools Courses ECON 5311 Macroeconomics ECON 5312 Microeconomics FCSE 5343 College Teaching (EDHE 5342) ISQS 5345 Advanced Statistics CEED 5377 Financial Counseling Research Courses CEED 7000 Research CEED 5378 Research Method 1 CEED 6378 Research Method 2 CEED 6330 Research Fund Development Statistics Courses See the course list on page 11. ** Requirement of 75 (minimum) semester hours, including master’s level courses and transferred hours, is exclusive of thesis and dissertation. (Students who have achieved candidacy and begun dissertation research must register in each regular semester, and at least once each summer until the degree requirements have been completed; unless granted an official leave of absence from the program for medical or other exceptional reasons.) *** Residence is normally accomplished by the completion of a full schedule (at least 12 semester hours) of graduate work in each of two consecutive terms. The purpose of residence in a doctoral program is to ensure the intellectual immersion of students in a research and learning environment. Students are expected to consult the department about specific residency requirements for the degree. Students holding half-time graduate assistantship may satisfy this requirement by 9 semester hours in each of the long terms, and 6 semester hours in the summer. Leveling requirements will be determined by the Advisory Committee, in collaboration with the student, based on transcript evaluation. Students who are required to complete courses for leveling must maintain a grade of B or above in leveling courses. Transfer Credit Policy Ph.D. students may transfer up to 24 hours of graduate level courses earned within seven years prior to admission to the doctoral program. A syllabus and transcript must be submitted for approval of any courses transferred. The Advisory Committee will decide the number of hours that the student will be allowed to transfer. A grade of less than a B will not be accepted. Students may have up to 30 graduate credit hours taken from TTU accepted into this program. However, courses taken more than eight consecutive calendar 6
  • 7. years old at the time of the final oral examination may not be used to satisfy the degree requirements. This policy is in addition to those currently imposed by the university. Selecting A Dissertation Committee Students can select their dissertation committees after their program of study meeting. Students should choose a minimum of five (three from the PFP/CE faculty (one will serve as chair) and one outside the PFP Division and one outside the college). Prior to choosing a major advisor (chair), the student is encouraged to discuss research interests and career goals with several faculty members. The student should select the major advisor who may be different from the assigned temporary advisor. When selecting committee members the student should consult with his or her major advisor. Faculty will serve on two dissertation committees to completion before becoming eligible to serve as a chair of a dissertation. The committee chair must be a member of the PFP faculty qualified by academic preparation, have graduate faculty status and have related teaching or work experience. Change of Advisor/Committee Dissertation A change in major advisor or committee requires submission of the necessary forms to the Graduate School. Comprehensive Exam The student will take a comprehensive exam to establish candidacy consisting of both written and oral portions to determine whether he or she is prepared to conduct independent research and has mastery of content and knowledge appropriate to his or her degree plan. Students may take the comp exam during the last semester of course work and must be taken within 12 months of the completion of course work. The student may make a request to the dissertation committee chair to take the exam. This exam will be comprehensive over all coursework and knowledge areas. Evaluation will focus on knowledge and written expression. Knowledge will be evaluated by assessing the level of mastery on one’s chosen area of doctoral study. Written expression will be evaluated by the following: language usage, breadth of vocabulary, avoidance of jargon and colloquialisms, and formality of writing style To be admitted to candidacy the student must demonstrate the following: • Competency in designing research studies appropriate to area of study • Understanding of relationship between research methodologies and research analyses appropriate to area of study, including the development of testable research hypotheses/research questions and research design that adequately tests the research hypotheses/research questions. • Ability to discuss research issues and controversies relevant to the area of study including the citation of examples from the literature. 7
  • 8. • Understanding of the components of a proposal relevant to the area of study. • Ability to assimilate, enumerate, and analyze course work relevant to the specific question. • Ability to support the ideas, premises, arguments or summaries with appropriate references from readings in the relevant area. • Ability to thoroughly and comprehensively explore and present responses which justify and support position. • Ability to present information clearly in a logical and well-organized manner. Research Methods are a critical component of the program of study and the Comprehensive Exam. The exam will determine if the student is adequately prepared to proceed with their dissertation research. Students are expected to independently design and conduct research deemed by the dissertation committee as contributing to the body of knowledge in their discipline. Students will assume the responsibility for becoming an expert in the area of their dissertation research. Therefore, the student is expected to demonstrate research, methodological and analytical expertise sufficient to assume full responsibility for their dissertation research. The Ph.D. Program Advisor will compile the questions for the exam after receiving them from the committee members. Each student will have a minimum of 6 questions. Questions will be administered in the following areas: • Research Collateral o Research Methodology in specialization area: 2 questions o Statistics and Analyses: 1 question • Specialization Area (CEED/PFP): 2 or more questions • Interdisciplinary Collateral: 1 question The oral portion of the comprehensive examination will allow the faculty to further assess the student's present level and capabilities in any of the areas included in the written portion of the examination. In addition, the student could be assessed on independence of thought, oral expression, organizational ability, and ability to perceive relationships among concepts. Possible Outcomes A student who takes the comprehensive exam may anticipate one of several outcomes including: • Permission to proceed to doctoral candidacy. • If the student fails the comprehensive exam, the committee will have the opportunity to recommend specific coursework or areas of coursework it deems necessary for continued doctoral study. • One re-examination after completing recommended coursework, with possible outcomes being continuance or termination. • Termination of graduate study. 8
  • 9. Guidelines for Research Preparation of Proposal The first step of the process is to select a research problem that is approved by the all members of dissertation committee. When the topic is approved, the student, in consultation with the committee, will prepare a more detailed plan of work (a comprehensive proposal) that will include three main parts: An Introduction (Statement of Problem, Purpose Statement); Review of Literature; Explanation of the Design of the Study and Methods. Note, however, that a conceptual/theoretical framework for the research is required. The proposal must demonstrate to the committee that the student has a through understanding of the research problem and research process. Rudestam and Newton (2001) suggest: “By and large, your dissertation committee will need to be convinced of three things in order to be comfortable with your proposal: 1. Is the question clear and researchable, and will the answer to the question extend knowledge of your filed of study? 2. Have you located your question within a context of previous study that demonstrates that you have mastered and taken into consideration the relevant background literature? 3. Is the proposed method suitable for exploring your question?” (p.17) The following outline may be useful in developing your dissertation proposal for an empirical study: Introduction • Background of the problem and justification of the study • Purpose or general objectives • Statement of the problem of problem or the research questions • Theoretical or conceptual background of contexts • Specific objectives • Assumptions and limitation • Operational Definitions of terms Review of Literature • Classic, definitive or influential research • Explanation and application of a theoretical or conceptual framework • Summary and analysis of the literature as applied to the research problem Design of the Study and Methods • Hypotheses and/or research questions 9
  • 10. • Instrument selection or development • Validity and reliability of the sample or instrument • Procedures for pilot testing • Sampling procedures • Method of collecting data • Method of analyzing data Approval and Modification of Proposal A formal meeting of the committee shall be held to discuss the proposal. Students should give a final copy of the proposal to the committee members two weeks in advance of a proposal meeting. Students should expect to make a brief presentation to the committee to summarize the proposal. The final proposal shall be signed by the major advisor and by all members of the committee. When approved by all parties, the proposal constitutes an agreement that data may be collected and specifies the steps that will be taken to complete the study. As long as the student follows the steps outlined in the proposal at the time it is approved, the advisor and committee members are discouraged from demanding significant changes to the study. However, it is not uncommon for there for be small changes because it is impossible to predict adjustments that may need to be made during the process of collecting and analyzing data. Conducting the Research Any research at TTU, including dissertation research, that involves colleting responses from people must be reviewed and approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Forms and procedures are available at www.ors.ttu.edu All research should be prepared using the style of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (5th edition) and Texas Tech University’s “Instructions for Preparing and Submitting Theses and Dissertations.” Final Examination The student’s dissertation committee will conduct the final examination after the dissertation has been completed. The final examination will be oral and will be primarily critical evaluation of the dissertation (defense). The committee will decide whether the student has passed and suggest any necessary revisions or corrections to the dissertation, which must be completed before the submission of the dissertation to the Graduate School. The student must be registered in the semester in which the final examination is administered and degree requirements are completed. The student shall consult with the major advisor and committee members to select the date and time for the final examination and reserve a room for the meeting. At least two weeks (10 working days) before the date of the final examination, the student and major advisor will submit the final copy of the dissertation to the committee members for review. 10
  • 11. Responsibility of Ph.D. Students 1. Read the Graduate School Catalog, Ph.D. Student Manual and the “Instructions for Preparing and Submitting Theses and Dissertations”. 2. Observe and meet Graduate School deadlines (see TTU Graduate Catalog) regarding: (a) plan of study (b) draft copy of dissertation (c) oral examination, and (d) final copy of dissertation. 3. Confer with the Ph.D. Advisor concerning: (a) Rechecking plan of study when enrolling for the semester in which degree is to be conferred. (b) Plan of study (to be developed with Advisory Committee), (c) Comprehensive examination, (d) Selection of dissertation committee chair and members, (e) Research interests, and (f) Enrollment procedures (consult with the Ph.D. Advisor each registration period). 4. Contact committee members requesting their membership on dissertation committee (after being admitted to candidacy). 5. Consult the dissertation committee on a regular basis regarding: (a) research proposal development, (b) research proposal presentation, (c) research proposal approval, (d) guidance during research, (e) planning committee meetings, (f) unanswered questions, and (g) planning for oral defense. 6. Provide bound copies of the dissertation to: (a) The Graduate School, (b) TTU library, (c) department, (d) dissertation committee chair, and (e) other dissertation committee members (optional but recommended). 11
  • 12. Recommended Statistics and Research Methods Courses AAEC 5307 Applied Econometrics I AAEC 6311 Applied Econometrics II ISQS 5345 Statistical Concepts for Business and Management ISQS 5347 Advanced Statistical Methods ISQS 5349 Regression Analysis ISQS 6348 Applied Multivariate Analysis PSY 5320 Data Analysis in Psychological Research (not in current catalog) PSY 5347 Advanced Correlational Methods and Factor Analysis PSY 5348 Advanced Multivariate Analysis for Psychologists PSY 5360 Structural Equation Modeling for Psychologists PSY 5380 Experimental Design EPSY 5380 Introduction to Educational Statistics EPSY 5381 Intermediate Educational Statistics EPSY 5382 Qualitative Research in Education EPSY 5383 Data Analysis With Statistical Software EPSY 5385 Foundations of Educational Research EPSY 6302 Survey Research in Education EPSY 6304 Qualitative Research Methods EPSY 6305 Qualitative Data Analysis in Education HDFS 5349 Quantitative Methods I in Human Development and Family Studies HDFS 5353 Multiple Regression Class HDFS 5354 Analysis of Multiple Dependent Variables (not in current catalog) HDFS 6362 Quantitative Methods II in Human Development and Family Studies HDFS 6364 Quantitative Methods III in Human Development and Family Studies HDFS 6365 Quantitative Methods IV in Human Development and Family Studies HDFS 6366 Qualitative Methods in Human Development and Family Studies HDFS 6370 Analyzing Developmental Data STAT 5302 Applied Statistics I STAT 5303 Applied Statistics II STAT 5326 Statistical Analysis STAT 5328 Intermediate Mathematical Statistics I STAT 5329 Intermediate Mathematical Statistics I STAT 5371 Regression Analysis Bachelor’s degree to Ph.D. At least three statistics courses beyond the bachelor’s degree and one additional research methods course in addition to Ph.D. degree plan. Statistics Courses: STAT 5302/ STAT 5303/ ISQS 5345/ ISQS 5347 ISQS 5349, ISQS 6348, HDFS 5354, HDFS 6370 Research Methods Courses: PSY, EPSY courses 12
  • 13. Thesis M.S. or M.A. to Ph.D. No additional statistics required beyond the Ph.D. degree plan unless the student is deficient in this area. Non-Thesis M.S. or M.A. or MBA to Ph.D. One additional statistics or methodology course is required beyond the Ph.D. degree plan. Guideline for Authorship and Use of Data Research is an integral facet of graduate study, and students are encouraged to seek publication of work performed in pursuit of advanced degrees. Many articles based on theses and dissertations completed at Texas Tech are in print in research journals. Authorship Papers resulting from dissertation research always shall recognize the student and the major advisor as coauthors. In those disciplines where authorship order is not always alphabetical, the student will generally be the first author listed in a publication resulting from a thesis or dissertation. In cases of considerable revision or addition of other data, the order of authorship should be subject to mutual agreement, based on the nature and extent of contribution of the parties concerned, and in accordance with accepted practice in the discipline. The adviser and student will jointly determine whether other committee members who contribute significantly should be included as coauthors or cited in acknowledgements. In such cases the order of second, third, or additional authors should be generally reflective of input to the project. It is advisable that the advisor and student establish a clear agreement at the beginning of a project regarding acceptable guidelines on publication processes and order of authorship. If there are certain stipulations regarding time lags, preparation of drafts of the publication, data collection or analyses, or others, the faculty member should describe these to the student. If a student does not draft a manuscript based on available data within 18 months after the student completes the degree, the major advisor can be listed as the primary author of any manuscripts that the advisor develops. In no case shall either the student or advisor submit an article or manuscript derived from the dissertation without showing both the student and adviser as authors. Persons not directly involved in a project have no right to publish data from the project unless permission is obtained in writing from the researchers involved. Ownership of Data When the research or development project is supported by funds from the university, including grants and contracts (unless specified in the contract), the data are the property 13
  • 14. of the university and the responsible academic unit. The project director or principal investigator is responsible for appropriate use of the data. The university should be identified as the agency in which the work was accomplished, and the guidelines of any sponsoring agency should be followed. Data are to be retained by the department and are not to be removed by departing faculty, students, or technical personnel. In those cases in which the university provides no financial direct support, it will still be deemed to have provided indirect support through use of facilities, equipment, and faculty time. Data from such projects are considered the co-property of the academic department advisor and the student. Thus, the major advisor and the student are considered to be responsible representatives of the department, and both the advisor and the student should retain copies of the data. Major Steps in the Ph.D. Program By February 1 Apply for admission Acceptance into the program Apply for scholarships and fellowships Before the First Semester Plan first semester course of study with temporary mentor First Semester A temporary mentor is assigned Meet with program advisory committee to determine plan of study in the last month of the first semester Second Semester File doctoral program plan of study Set up program advisory/dissertation committee After the Second Semester Proceed with coursework File changes in degree plan (if necessary) Annual degree plan review with Graduate Advisor Take comprehensive examination; successfully pass Recommendation for admission to Ph.D. candidacy; department sends results to the Graduate School Present dissertation proposal to members of dissertation committee for approval File dissertation topic and committee form with the Graduate School Proceed with dissertation project Draft copies of dissertation Check all Graduate School deadlines for compliance Submit amended copy of plan of study (if necessary) Complete dissertation research; prepare final draft copy; submit to dissertation committee members File statement of Intent to Graduate File official title of dissertation Schedule oral defense of dissertation 14
  • 15. Submit copy of doctoral defense announcement Obtain dissertation packet containing title page from Graduate School Notify department of oral defense date Public oral defense of dissertation File report of final exam with Graduate School Pay diploma fee; give copy of receipt to Graduate School Complete any remaining Graduate School forms and evaluations 15

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