Junior Parent Meeting Presentation

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  • Students experience a huge push in language arts to “step-up” portfolio entries with the goal of reaching proficiency. Typically experience higher levels of core content areas : math - Algebra II; science - chemistry and/or physics; social studies - may elect to take AP US History. The primary assessment year for high school students with regard to CATS testing . Many students get their first part-time job during their junior year because they finally have a drivers license. Thus, may find this year to be difficult because they’re trying to learn to manage their time while also taking more challenging coursework . All in all, your students are feeling a snowball effect pushing them toward that coveted senior year!
  • Students experience a huge push in language arts to “step-up” portfolio entries with the goal of reaching proficiency. Typically experience higher levels of core content areas : math - Algebra II; science - chemistry and/or physics; social studies - may elect to take AP US History. The primary assessment year for high school students with regard to CATS testing . Many students get their first part-time job during their junior year because they finally have a drivers license. Thus, may find this year to be difficult because they’re trying to learn to manage their time while also taking more challenging coursework . All in all, your students are feeling a snowball effect pushing them toward that coveted senior year!
  • Juniors that intend to pursue a four year degree should probably take a college entrance exam during the second semester .
  • Juniors that intend to pursue a four year degree should probably take a college entrance exam during the second semester .
  • Juniors that intend to pursue a four year degree should probably take a college entrance exam during the second semester .
  • This test is recommended for those who plan to continue their education with college. National Merit Scholarship Competition – any where from $500 - $2500 in scholarships monies – some renewable, some not.
  • Students who become involved in some type of activity are more successful in school. Many colleges will be more likely to accept “average” students if they’ve been involved in high school because it shows that they’re more well-rounded . Should keep a list of everything. Time management is a major factor in determining your student’s success or lack of this year. Remember that while activities are important, without the grades, they won’t carry much weight. Try to help your student by “monitoring” agenda use, sleep time, diet, and simple “down time.”
  • Junior Parent Meeting Presentation

    1. 1. Junior Parent Meeting
    2. 2. WARNING: <ul><li>The junior year is thought to typically be the toughest, academically, of the four year high school experience. </li></ul>
    3. 3. Important Events & Dates: <ul><li>Check weekly Guidance Glimpse and monthly Counselor’s Corner Newsletter for upcoming dates and events. </li></ul>
    4. 4. Junior Programs
    5. 5. Governor’s Scholars Program <ul><li>Stimulating, five-week, residential summer program for outstanding Kentucky students completing their junior year in high school. </li></ul><ul><li>Provides academic and personal growth in a challenging, non-traditional experience that balances a strong liberal arts program with a full co-curricular and residential life experience. </li></ul>
    6. 6. Governor’s Scholars Program <ul><li>Must have a standardized test score (PSAT, ACT, or SAT) </li></ul><ul><li>October  - Applications sent to guidance counselors' offices. </li></ul><ul><li>Applications due before finals start in December </li></ul><ul><li>Decision made in January </li></ul><ul><li>For more info http://www.kygsp.org/ </li></ul>
    7. 7. Governor’s School for the Arts <ul><li>On-line GSA Summer Program applications available beginning Oct. 1st </li></ul><ul><li>Provides hands-on-arts opportunity for the states talented high school students who are dancers, actors, instrumental and vocal musicians, creative writers, future architects or visual artists. </li></ul>
    8. 8. Governor’s School for the Arts <ul><li>Primary component includes a three week summer residential program, regional arts workshops and master classes, college and career day and an artistic roster of performing and visual artists made up of GSA Alumni. </li></ul><ul><li>For more info go to http://www.kentuckygsa.com </li></ul>
    9. 9. Hardin County Youth Leadership <ul><li>The program’s objective is to develop leadership skills of future community leaders. </li></ul><ul><li>Students will attend 8 sessions during the school year. </li></ul><ul><li>Sessions will be held throughout Hardin County and will meet once per month during the school day. </li></ul><ul><li>Students who complete the program will be recognized at the Youth Leadership graduation program in May. </li></ul>
    10. 10. Girls and Boys State <ul><li>American Legion Boys States and Girls States are among the most respected and selective Educational Programs of Government instruction for High School students. </li></ul><ul><li>They are participatory programs where each participant becomes a part of the operation of his or her Local, County and State Government. </li></ul>
    11. 11. Girls and Boys State <ul><li>During Boys State and Girls State programs, participants are exposed to the Rights, Privileges, Duties, and Responsibilities of Citizenship. </li></ul>
    12. 12. Nolin RECC Youth Tour <ul><li>Nolin RECC sponsors a Youth Tour Contest for an all-expense-paid trip to Washington,D.C. in the summer. </li></ul><ul><li>In order to qualify you must receive electric service from Nolin. </li></ul><ul><li>Application information is sent to Guidance office in early spring. </li></ul>
    13. 13. APES Seminar <ul><li>A 2-day workshop in Nov. that provides competitive lessons on cooperatives, corporations, and the business world. </li></ul><ul><li>Students actively solve real corporate problems. </li></ul><ul><li>Six students are selected to attend State and have chance at Nationals. </li></ul>
    14. 14. Testing Information ACT & SAT
    15. 15. ACT <ul><li>Should take in spring of Junior year. </li></ul><ul><li>Date – Feb (Registration Deadline is in Jan) </li></ul><ul><li>Writing component (optional) for additional fee </li></ul><ul><li>More info at www.act.org </li></ul>
    16. 16. ACT Test Preparation <ul><li>The best preparation is a solid high school curriculum </li></ul><ul><li>Become familiar with the test content and format </li></ul><ul><li>ACT includes four curriculum-based tests -- English, Math, Reading, and Science </li></ul>
    17. 17. ACT Test Preparation <ul><li>ACT Test Prep in PASS </li></ul><ul><li>Learn appropriate test-taking strategies </li></ul><ul><li>Take practice tests in booklet </li></ul>Take Practice Tests at ACT student website www.actstudent.org
    18. 18. SAT <ul><li>Should take in spring of </li></ul><ul><li>Junior year. </li></ul><ul><li>2 areas: Verbal and Mathematics </li></ul><ul><li>Required Writing Component </li></ul>
    19. 19. SAT <ul><li>Date - Jan. (Application deadline is in Dec.) </li></ul><ul><li>www.collegeboard.com for more information </li></ul><ul><li>Sylvan Learning Center </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Has many programs but ACT/SAT prep is offered </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Contact – Inez Crepps </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Phone – 769-0095 </li></ul></ul>
    20. 20. PSAT/NMSQT <ul><li>College-bound 10 th & 11 th graders </li></ul><ul><li>Measures critical reading, math problem-solving, and writing skills. </li></ul><ul><li>The best preparation for the SAT Test. </li></ul><ul><li>More info at www.collegeboard.com </li></ul><ul><li>The only way for students to enter the National Merit Scholarship Competition </li></ul>
    21. 21. Short-term Planning
    22. 22. ACTIVITIES <ul><li>SPORTS </li></ul><ul><li>CLUBS </li></ul><ul><li>VOLUNTEER TIME </li></ul><ul><li>COMMUNITY SERVICE </li></ul><ul><li>CHURCH YOUTH GROUPS </li></ul><ul><li>Students should be keeping an updated resume of all activities, especially awards received or volunteer/community service hours logged. </li></ul>
    23. 23. THE PRE-COLLEGE CURRICULUM <ul><li>English/Language Arts </li></ul><ul><li>4 credits required: English I, II, III,IV (or AP English) </li></ul><ul><li>Mathematics </li></ul><ul><li>3 credits required: Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry (or their equivalents) </li></ul><ul><li>Science </li></ul><ul><li>3 credits required: life science (Bio), physical science (Chem), and earth/space science (Intro to Sci) - at least one lab course </li></ul><ul><li>Social Studies </li></ul><ul><li>3 credits required: Survey (Economics & Geography), World Civilization, & U.S. </li></ul><ul><li>History </li></ul><ul><li>Health & Physical Education </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>½ credit required of each </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    24. 24. THE PRE-COLLEGE CURRICULUM <ul><li>History and Appreciation of Visual, Performing Arts </li></ul><ul><li>1 credit required or another arts course that incorporates such content (Band or Choir taught at EHS) </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Foreign Language </li></ul><ul><li>2 credits required or demonstrated competency </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Electives </li></ul><ul><li>Requirement is 5 credits ( 3 rigorous) </li></ul><ul><li>Recommended strongly: 1 or more courses develop computer skills </li></ul><ul><li>TOTAL CREDITS: </li></ul><ul><li>22  [17 required credits; 5 elective credits] </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Rigorous electives should be in social studies, science, math, English, arts and humanities, foreign language, and above the introductory level in business, marketing, and technology education. </li></ul></ul></ul>
    25. 25. Core Curriculum/ACT Score Study National Core or More National Ave. (Total) National Less than Core Core Curriculum: 4 Units – English 3 Units – Math 3 Units – Social Studies 3 Units – Natural Sciences Source: 2004 ACT High School Profile
    26. 26. NCAA Information DIVISION I If you enroll in a Division I college in 2008 or later and want to participate in athletics or receive an athletics scholarship during your first year, you must: • Graduate from high school; • Complete 16 core courses; • Earn a minimum required grade-point average in your core courses (at least a 2.0); and • Earn a combined SAT or ACT sum score that matches your core-course grade-point average and test score sliding scale.
    27. 27. NAIA Information <ul><li>An entering freshman student must be a graduate of an accredited high school and meet two of the three entry level requirements below: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>a) A minimum score of 18 on the ACT (or 860 on the SAT Critical Reading and Math sections). The score must be achieved at a single test sitting and no composite scores or sum scores can be utilized. </li></ul></ul>
    28. 28. NAIA Information <ul><ul><li>b) An overall high school grade point average of 2.000 or higher on a 4.000 scale (which includes all course work taken through the term immediately prior to graduation. There are no core course requirements for the NAIA). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>c) Graduate in the upper half of the student's high school graduating class. </li></ul></ul>
    29. 29. College Planning
    30. 30. Remember, GPA is only ONE factor used for college admission and scholarship decisions! Source: ACT College Planning Guide
    31. 31. Consider College Characteristics <ul><li>Majors & educational programs </li></ul><ul><li>Type of school & degrees offered </li></ul><ul><li>Admission policy </li></ul><ul><li>Location & size </li></ul><ul><li>Costs & financial aid </li></ul><ul><li>College affiliation & accreditation </li></ul><ul><li>Campus activities </li></ul><ul><li>Support services </li></ul>Source: ACT College Planning Guide
    32. 32. Campus Visits & Interviews
    33. 33. List, Compare, and Visit Colleges <ul><li>Compile information from several resources: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Internet/Websites </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>College catalogs, bulletins, & videos </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>College representatives & college fairs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Counselors and teachers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Parents, students, and alumni </li></ul></ul>
    34. 34. List, Compare, and Visit Colleges <ul><li>Prepare a college comparison checklist </li></ul><ul><li>Weigh advantages & disadvantages </li></ul><ul><li>Contact the office of admission </li></ul><ul><li>Schedule appointments for your campus visits </li></ul>Source: ACT College Planning Guide
    35. 35. Every campus has a “personality” Source: ACT College Planning Guide
    36. 36. Checklist for a Campus Visit <ul><li>Meet with an Admission Counselor to verify admission requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Meet with a Financial Aid Officer/Scholarship Chairman to determine actual college costs and ask about financial aid opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>Take a campus tour </li></ul>
    37. 37. Checklist for a Campus Visit <ul><li>Investigate academic program(s) </li></ul><ul><li>Attend a class </li></ul><ul><li>Talk with students and faculty </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss chances for success: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>admission </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>graduation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>placement </li></ul></ul></ul>Source: ACT College Planning Guide
    38. 38. Financial Aid
    39. 39. Develop a Plan <ul><li>Determine college costs </li></ul><ul><li>Investigate ALL possible resources: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Savings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Prepaid Tuition Programs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Financial aid: scholarships, grants, loans & work-study </li></ul></ul>
    40. 40. Develop a Plan <ul><li>Secure necessary forms and note deadlines </li></ul><ul><li>Apply for financial aid as early as possible (cannot file FAFSA until Jan. 1) </li></ul>Source: ACT College Planning Guide
    41. 41. Don’t eliminate any college because of costs before receiving financial assistance information! Source: ACT College Planning Guide
    42. 42. What Does Postsecondary Education Cost?
    43. 43. Resources
    44. 44. Websites for Information <ul><li>1. www.collegeboard.com - Information on SAT, online registration, college planning, financial aid </li></ul><ul><li>2. www.act.org and/or www.actstudent.org - Information on ACT, online registration, college planning, financial aid </li></ul><ul><li>3. www.kheaa.com - Access KEES account, virtual campus tours, financial aid & scholarship information </li></ul><ul><li>4. www.gohigherky.org - Virtual campus tours, college planning, choosing a college, paying for college </li></ul><ul><li>5. www.petersons.com - Information on college choices, scholarships, standardized test prep, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>6. www.fastweb.com - Find college financial aid, search for scholarships and get money for college </li></ul><ul><li>7. www.fafsa.ed.gov - Electronically submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>8. www.finaid.org - Comprehensive, free financial aid, testing, & college admissions info </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>9. www.college-scholarships.com - Information on college scholarships and financial aid, free college scholarship search </li></ul></ul></ul>

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