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MCDM People and Story Reporting and BRoll Lecture

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  • Today:\n\nReading Reflections\nTalk About Client Assignments\nReview and Talk B roll\nTalk about reporting and interfacing with clients\nBrainstorm Stakeholders\n\n
  • 10 mins, 6:00-6:10\n\n*Ability to drop one assignment\n*Assignments due at noon on day of class (and why)\n*Shooting help for extra credit\n*Any questions?\n
  • 10 mins 6:10-6:20\n\n101’s: Any tips that particularly stuck out or that you hadn’t heard before\n\nWhat about in Kalow? Did it help you with your b-roll shoot? Favorite tip? Headphones? Limit use of Zoom or Pan\n\nFade to Black:\nWhat did you think about his thesis that TV news is missing an opportunity as video expands? What about folks from J backgrounds?\nVideo is still dominant in rest of world ie Al Jazeera, RT, France 24 *emerging markets*\nGrowing dominance of ‘amature video’\n
  • 10 mins 6:10-6:20\n\n101’s: Any tips that particularly stuck out or that you hadn’t heard before\n\nWhat about in Kalow? Did it help you with your b-roll shoot? Favorite tip? Headphones? Limit use of Zoom or Pan\n\nFade to Black:\nWhat did you think about his thesis that TV news is missing an opportunity as video expands? What about folks from J backgrounds?\nVideo is still dominant in rest of world ie Al Jazeera, RT, France 24 *emerging markets*\nGrowing dominance of ‘amature video’\n
  • 10 mins 6:10-6:20\n\n101’s: Any tips that particularly stuck out or that you hadn’t heard before\n\nWhat about in Kalow? Did it help you with your b-roll shoot? Favorite tip? Headphones? Limit use of Zoom or Pan\n\nFade to Black:\nWhat did you think about his thesis that TV news is missing an opportunity as video expands? What about folks from J backgrounds?\nVideo is still dominant in rest of world ie Al Jazeera, RT, France 24 *emerging markets*\nGrowing dominance of ‘amature video’\n
  • 60 min (6:20-7:20)\nHow many of you actually have notebooks and pens with you, I encourage you to take notes by hand today.\n\nHint: You should ALWAYS have a notebook and pen with you! \n\nMost interview/reporting situations still require that you do that (even if you’re recording you want a short hand record of events/interviews and sometime opportunities happen when all you have is a pen and paper) and it’s a skill worth developing (develop your own shorthand--I use b/c for “because” ppl for “people” “NP” for nonprofit, etc)\n\n
  • How many of you have “reported” something before?\n\nWhat’s the difference between an academic paper and a piece of journalism?\n(I ask this b/c of how often I receive submission for the CLP that are written like a school paper)\n\nWhat’s the difference between a “primary source” and a “secondary source”?\n-We still use secondary sources in journalism (UNHCR report for example)\n\nWhat do I mean by “constant sourcing”? (for example “Seattle is a major destination for new immigrants to the United States.” WHO said that? When I asked the student they said “you.”)\n\n\n\n\n
  • How many of you have “reported” something before?\n\nWhat’s the difference between an academic paper and a piece of journalism?\n(I ask this b/c of how often I receive submission for the CLP that are written like a school paper)\n\nWhat’s the difference between a “primary source” and a “secondary source”?\n-We still use secondary sources in journalism (UNHCR report for example)\n\nWhat do I mean by “constant sourcing”? (for example “Seattle is a major destination for new immigrants to the United States.” WHO said that? When I asked the student they said “you.”)\n\n\n\n\n
  • How many of you have “reported” something before?\n\nWhat’s the difference between an academic paper and a piece of journalism?\n(I ask this b/c of how often I receive submission for the CLP that are written like a school paper)\n\nWhat’s the difference between a “primary source” and a “secondary source”?\n-We still use secondary sources in journalism (UNHCR report for example)\n\nWhat do I mean by “constant sourcing”? (for example “Seattle is a major destination for new immigrants to the United States.” WHO said that? When I asked the student they said “you.”)\n\n\n\n\n
  • How many of you have “reported” something before?\n\nWhat’s the difference between an academic paper and a piece of journalism?\n(I ask this b/c of how often I receive submission for the CLP that are written like a school paper)\n\nWhat’s the difference between a “primary source” and a “secondary source”?\n-We still use secondary sources in journalism (UNHCR report for example)\n\nWhat do I mean by “constant sourcing”? (for example “Seattle is a major destination for new immigrants to the United States.” WHO said that? When I asked the student they said “you.”)\n\n\n\n\n
  • \nWho has started reporting already? Where have you gone/what have you done? A big part of reporting is going and learning through doing.\nman-on-the-street\n\nyour network\n\nLibrarians\n\nSocial Networking Example: Zoo Facebook group (as opposed to zoo media office)\n\nBut above all: YOU TALK TO PEOPLE WHO ARE DIRECTLY AFFECTED BY THE ISSUE YOU’RE EXPLORING--on all sides of the issue of course.\n\nLet’s shop a specific story. Who wants to volunteer?\n\n[for next quarter add: Twitter (specifically), FB groups, show public insight network as an example]\n\n
  • \nWho has started reporting already? Where have you gone/what have you done? A big part of reporting is going and learning through doing.\nman-on-the-street\n\nyour network\n\nLibrarians\n\nSocial Networking Example: Zoo Facebook group (as opposed to zoo media office)\n\nBut above all: YOU TALK TO PEOPLE WHO ARE DIRECTLY AFFECTED BY THE ISSUE YOU’RE EXPLORING--on all sides of the issue of course.\n\nLet’s shop a specific story. Who wants to volunteer?\n\n[for next quarter add: Twitter (specifically), FB groups, show public insight network as an example]\n\n
  • \nWho has started reporting already? Where have you gone/what have you done? A big part of reporting is going and learning through doing.\nman-on-the-street\n\nyour network\n\nLibrarians\n\nSocial Networking Example: Zoo Facebook group (as opposed to zoo media office)\n\nBut above all: YOU TALK TO PEOPLE WHO ARE DIRECTLY AFFECTED BY THE ISSUE YOU’RE EXPLORING--on all sides of the issue of course.\n\nLet’s shop a specific story. Who wants to volunteer?\n\n[for next quarter add: Twitter (specifically), FB groups, show public insight network as an example]\n\n
  • You’ve found/been assigned a story. What’s you’re first move? \n\nWhat’s the hardest part of reporting for you guys?\n-How do you make that first cold call?\n-How do you know how many sources you need?\n-What resources do you already have?\n\nTell them about your deadline!\n\nLet’s shop a specific story. Who wants to volunteer?\n
  • \nRespect your sources (they are doing you a favor so respect their time and be sensitive to their needs/values but remember that they said “yes” to you b/c they want to do this. If you act too cringing and apologetic they won’t trust you). Be flexible to their schedule. Send a thank you. \n\nBe Prepared for Emotion: Often in this field you are dealing with people in emotionally intense circumstances (lost jobs, traumas revisited, vulnerability) be prepared for people to cry or get angry and allow them to.\n\nRepresent yourself honestly and professionally: For this class you can say that you are working NCDM but when you are freelancing or “on spec” you have to reveal that to sources (you can say “I’m freelancing but in conversations with NYTimes about placement”)\n\nDon’t take things personally: People are wary of the media/journalists, they’re also often emotional about what they’re talking about/showing you. The challenge of being a journalist is finding a balance btwn being present and authentic and remaining neutral/retaining journalistic distance.\n\n\n\n\n
  • \n\nHow to talk to your clients -- what do they want -- what questions to ask: Where can I see it happening? Who should I talk to? Who is affected by your work? \n\nManaging expectations - don’t overpromise, do tell them what to expect and help them understand how much control they do/don’t have over the story and how helping you is going to help them get a good piece.\n\nMake sure they’re actually comfortable having you do this! Access!\n
  • You may have heard this if you’re in her other class, but worth refreshing.\n\nIf you haven’t taken Ethics we’ll just touch on it briefly. Later on in the course we’ll have a more involved class on emerging ethical issues in the shifting media landscape.\n\nIn the meantime, if you have doubts ask us and refer to SPJ code.\n
  • Until 7:20\n\nIf you’re confused about who your client is - raise your hand and we’ll discuss.\n\nActivity: Pair up and brainstorm list of stakeholders and scenes related to your story\nPie in the sky listing of what you want to get in your ideal world\nSit down with your teammate to bounce ideas for who to talk to; what to ask client for.  \nAlso a chance for teammates to talk logistics & scheduling.\n\n
  • 25min (7:20-7:45)\n\nBefore Extended Break \n\nCheck in with us if you’re feeling stuck\n\nAny changes/updates?\n\nClarify, in general what we’re talking about these projects looking like - who we mean when we say client.\n\nEach person give short spiel about their story.\nWhat is the story about? If you’ve thought about it, what will it look like?\n\n\n
  • \n
  • 60 mins 7:45-8:45\n\nReview B roll assignments:\n\n\n\n\n\n
  • 25 mins (8:45-9:10)\n\nWe’re going to use it to cover up cuts in the audio\nsee how he shows exactly what the sequence is narrating -- we’re can always be that literal though.\n
  • 25 mins (8:45-9:10)\n\nWe’re going to use it to cover up cuts in the audio\nsee how he shows exactly what the sequence is narrating -- we’re can always be that literal though.\n
  • 25 mins (8:45-9:10)\n\nWe’re going to use it to cover up cuts in the audio\nsee how he shows exactly what the sequence is narrating -- we’re can always be that literal though.\n
  • 25 mins (8:45-9:10)\n\nWe’re going to use it to cover up cuts in the audio\nsee how he shows exactly what the sequence is narrating -- we’re can always be that literal though.\n
  • (8:45-9:10)\n
  • (8:45-9:10)\n
  • (8:45-9:10)\n
  • (8:45-9:10)\n
  • (8:45-9:10)\n
  • (8:45-9:10)\n
  • 25mins (9:10 to 9:35)\n\nHow many people have camera’s with them? If a lot, then follow along with me\n
  • \n\n\n
  • \n\n\n
  • \n\n\n
  • \n\n\n
  • \n\n\n
  • First, reflect on Charlene Strong.\n\n50 mins - until 9:35\n
  • 10 mins (9:35 - 9:45)\n\nReadings:\nCLP's Interviewing 101\nWatch Rough Cut of CLP documentary Barzan Password: FeelTheLove \n\nAssignments Due:\nFinalized project proposal/story treatment, including publication plan. (Word document)\n2-4 minute practice sit down interview using your equipment. Concentrate on audio, lighting, white balance, composition. Include room tone.\n\nBring equipment to class (Video camera, microphone, tripod)\n\n\n
  • Readings:\nCLP's Interviewing 101\nWatch Rough Cut of CLP documentary Barzan Password: FeelTheLove \n\nAssignments Due:\nFinalized project proposal/story treatment, including publication plan. (Word document)\n2-4 minute practice sit down interview using your equipment. Concentrate on audio, lighting, white balance, composition. Include room tone.\n\nBring equipment to class (Video camera, microphone, tripod)\n\n\n
  • 5 mins - 9:45-9:50\n
  • Transcript

    • 1. PEOPLE AND STORYMCDM Program - Fall 2011 - COM 583
    • 2. MORE ON THE SYLLABUS! http://tinyurl.com/clpmcdm
    • 3. READING RECAP
    • 4. READING RECAPNancy Kalow: Visual Storytelling
    • 5. READING RECAPNancy Kalow: Visual StorytellingCLP: Photo, Audio and Video 101
    • 6. READING RECAPNancy Kalow: Visual StorytellingCLP: Photo, Audio and Video 101 Dave Marash: Fade to Black
    • 7. REPORTING WORKSHOP
    • 8. WHAT DO I MEAN BY “REPORTING”?
    • 9. WHAT DO I MEAN BY “REPORTING”? Original material
    • 10. WHAT DO I MEAN BY “REPORTING”? Original material Interviews
    • 11. WHAT DO I MEAN BY “REPORTING”? Original material Interviews Context and Description
    • 12. WHAT DO I MEAN BY “REPORTING”? Original material Interviews Context and Description Constant Sourcing
    • 13. WHERE TO START:
    • 14. WHERE TO START: -Chambers of commerce -Non-profits/Advocates/Activists -Community groups -Social Networking sites -People you know
    • 15. WHERE TO START: -Chambers of commerce -Non-profits/Advocates/Activists -Community groups -Social Networking sites -People you knowBUT MOST IMPORTANTLY:
    • 16. WHERE TO START: -Chambers of commerce -Non-profits/Advocates/Activists -Community groups -Social Networking sites -People you know BUT MOST IMPORTANTLY:You talk to people directly affected by the issue you’re reporting
    • 17. HOW TO GET THEM TO TALK TO YOU: -Email/Call/Show up -Follow up -Pester -Ask sources for more sources -Reveal what you need
    • 18. HOW TO ACT ONCE YOU’RE TALKING TO THEM:• Be flexible• Mirror tone• Prepare for emotion• Don’t take things personally
    • 19. INTERFACING WITH CLIENTS• What does the client want?• Get your client to help you tell the story: • Where can I see it happening? • Who should I talk to? • Who is affected by your work?
    • 20. PROF. MCFARLING’S 5 COMMANDMENTSI. Thou shalt not make stuff upII.Thou shalt not plagiarizeIII.Thou shalt not be too lazy to make that extra callIV.Thou shalt not use quotations directly from press releasesV.Thou shalt not use material from the Internet without verifying it.
    • 21. ACTIVITY: STAKEHOLDERS• Brainstorm a list of • Scenes • Primary Sources • Secondary Sources • Events/activities • B-Roll
    • 22. PROJECT ASSIGNMENTS• Annette: Food Desert/ • Morgan: Sisters of Perpetual Grocery Store Indulgence• Heather: Cabinetmakers • Rodika: Seniors & Transportation• Jason: Iranian Filmmaker • Shanna: Evidence Room• John: Penny LaGate• Michael: Inspirational Teacher
    • 23. B-ROLL ASSIGNMENT• Visual • Audio • Establishing Shot • Ambient Sound • Medium Shot • Detailed Sound • Close Up • Extreme Close Up • Zoom • Pan
    • 24. Why do I need B-roll?
    • 25. Why do I need B-roll?★To make it more interesting!
    • 26. Why do I need B-roll?★To make it more interesting!★To show what people are talkingabout
    • 27. Why do I need B-roll?★To make it more interesting!★To show what people are talkingabout★To hide cuts in the interview
    • 28. Why do I need B-roll?★To make it more interesting!★To show what people are talkingabout★To hide cuts in the interview★Example: Undriving
    • 29. BASIC RULES OF B-ROLL
    • 30. BASIC RULES OF B-ROLL★Think in sequences
    • 31. BASIC RULES OF B-ROLL★Think in sequences★Stabilize it! Use a Tripod/Monopod
    • 32. BASIC RULES OF B-ROLL★Think in sequences★Stabilize it! Use a Tripod/Monopod★Compose your shot carefully
    • 33. BASIC RULES OF B-ROLL★Think in sequences★Stabilize it! Use a Tripod/Monopod★Compose your shot carefully★Keep the Camera Still!
    • 34. BASIC RULES OF B-ROLL★Think in sequences★Stabilize it! Use a Tripod/Monopod★Compose your shot carefully★Keep the Camera Still!★At least 10sec/shot
    • 35. BASIC RULES OF B-ROLL★Think in sequences★Stabilize it! Use a Tripod/Monopod★Compose your shot carefully★Keep the Camera Still!★At least 10sec/shot★Get Lots!
    • 36. QUICK CAMERA SETUP FOR B-ROLL Components:• Camera • Tripod• Battery • Monopod• Flash Card/Tape • Microphone (check levels)• Lens • Lighting (check exposure)
    • 37. MORE ADVANCEDSHOOTING TECHNIQUES
    • 38. MORE ADVANCED SHOOTING TECHNIQUES★Focus Roll
    • 39. MORE ADVANCED SHOOTING TECHNIQUES★Focus Roll★Walking in Step
    • 40. MORE ADVANCED SHOOTING TECHNIQUES★Focus Roll★Walking in Step★Rock Shots (what’s moving)
    • 41. MORE ADVANCED SHOOTING TECHNIQUES★Focus Roll★Walking in Step★Rock Shots (what’s moving)★Video Portrait
    • 42. MORE ADVANCED SHOOTING TECHNIQUES★Focus Roll★Walking in Step★Rock Shots (what’s moving)★Video Portrait★Drifting into/out of shots
    • 43. ASSIGNMENTS• Readings: • Thursday, Oct 11th at noon: • Watch Barzan • Project Proposal (email • Read CLP’s word doc Interviewing101 • 2-4min practice sit down interview -- with room tone (think audio, lighting, white balance, composition
    • 44. ASSIGNMENTSProject Proposal/ *Story summary. What is the story line forTreatment: your project? Who is the main character? What is the central conflict? *Video Treatment. What are your initial ideasIn a one-page memo, for the visual style of the piece? *Story details. Who are the characters that willdescribe your planned video drive the narrative? What kind of access do youproject.  List your name and have to those people thus far? Who else will you interview for background information?a working title for the What scenes will you include? What b-roll doproject at the top of your you plan to collect? *Production timeline. Briefly outline yourmemo. Please address the production schedule for the quarter.following items in your *Equipment. What equipment will you use to record your story?memo. *Publication Plan. Where will this work be published? How will people see it? How many people do you plan to reach? .
    • 45. FEEDBACK CARDS• What worked for you today?• What didn’t work for you today?• What do you want more of in the future?• What are you most excited/concerned about?