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Common Language Project for PNAJE

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Presentation by the Common Language Project about Entrepreneurial Journalism to the October 2011 meeting of the Pacific Northwest Association of Journalism Educators.

Presentation by the Common Language Project about Entrepreneurial Journalism to the October 2011 meeting of the Pacific Northwest Association of Journalism Educators.

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  • \n
  • The story of the CLP:\n*Who we are (3 young people with some background in media/journalism/non-profits)\n*How we started (credit cards, borrowed equipment and a dream)\n*Why we started (wanted different stories in the media--concept of underreported. Crisis in *journalism meant less international coverage and in-depth coverage of social issues)\n*What we do (multimedia journalists, non-profit administrators, media educators--entrepreneurial journalists often wear a lot of hats!)\n*What we do at the UW (teach, help other young journos develop, found a receptive place to experiment)\n\nWe’re seen as one of the first examples of entrepreneurial journalism (even though we’re small!) We fit the definition we’ll be using all morning: Experimenting with new economic models, exploring new journalistic storytelling techniques, including new voices.\n\n\n
  • How we came up with the idea--\nUnder reported (region/topic)\n\nHow we got it funded--\nFoundation support, grants, freelance fees, individual donors\n\nThe kinds of stories we did--\nAll mediums, different voices (like water walker), connecting international issues with local audiences reporting on Water 1st)\n\nHow we distributed the work: (through our outlet and others, more and more through FB and Twitter)\n
  • How we came up with the idea--\nUnder reported (region/topic)\n\nHow we got it funded--\nFoundation support, grants, freelance fees, individual donors\n\nThe kinds of stories we did--\nAll mediums, different voices (like water walker), connecting international issues with local audiences reporting on Water 1st)\n\nHow we distributed the work: (through our outlet and others, more and more through FB and Twitter)\n
  • Started with hybrid model that we’ve since expanded to include University support and soon sponsorship/ad revenue\n
  • Since 2009, \n
  • *Teaching: COM 363 - super cool, still accessible for non-jrnlsm majors for now\n\n*Workshops: Digital Survival Guide, Storytelling with Sound (show flyers)\n\n*MCDM\n
  • \n
  • Talk through Career Week, Mentor Lunches\n\nThis is an area where the Department is really interested in partnership with you guys - strong showing at these events. And we’re just building up the program, so your input will be very valuable.\n\nBrainstorm ways we might work together on prof dev?\n\nIn general, ways we can work together, act as an organizational resource.\n
  • Social Media Experts, Storytellers, Bloggers, Multimedia Producers, Mobile Editors, Reporters w/ HTML skills \n\n
  • Social Media Experts, Storytellers, Bloggers, Multimedia Producers, Mobile Editors, Reporters w/ HTML skills \n\n
  • Social Media Experts, Storytellers, Bloggers, Multimedia Producers, Mobile Editors, Reporters w/ HTML skills \n\n
  • Social Media Experts, Storytellers, Bloggers, Multimedia Producers, Mobile Editors, Reporters w/ HTML skills \n\n
  • Social Media Experts, Storytellers, Bloggers, Multimedia Producers, Mobile Editors, Reporters w/ HTML skills \n\n
  • Social Media Experts, Storytellers, Bloggers, Multimedia Producers, Mobile Editors, Reporters w/ HTML skills \n\n
  • Social Media Experts, Storytellers, Bloggers, Multimedia Producers, Mobile Editors, Reporters w/ HTML skills \n\n
  • Since 2009, \n
  • Waaaay more detail on Ballard traffic - or crime or events - than a citywide newspaper could ever cover. So it’s a smaller audience, but a niche one.\n\nWhich means...you can sell advertising on a very targeted, personal level.\n\nMuch more effective to advertise cupcakes on Cap Hill than everywhere btwn Olympia and Everett.\n\nWhat about pissing people off on the local level? What about alienating your advertisers?\n
  • Identifying stories. Understanding a publication’s audience/tone. Pitching to editors. Developing sources. Multimedia reporting. Ethics of independent reporting. Production and editing. Social Media Campaigns. Fact Checking yourself. Web Publishing. Online Revenue. New Business Models for Journalism.\n\n
  • Identifying stories. Understanding a publication’s audience/tone. Pitching to editors. Developing sources. Multimedia reporting. Ethics of independent reporting. Production and editing. Social Media Campaigns. Fact Checking yourself. Web Publishing. Online Revenue. New Business Models for Journalism.\n\n
  • Identifying stories. Understanding a publication’s audience/tone. Pitching to editors. Developing sources. Multimedia reporting. Ethics of independent reporting. Production and editing. Social Media Campaigns. Fact Checking yourself. Web Publishing. Online Revenue. New Business Models for Journalism.\n\n
  • Identifying stories. Understanding a publication’s audience/tone. Pitching to editors. Developing sources. Multimedia reporting. Ethics of independent reporting. Production and editing. Social Media Campaigns. Fact Checking yourself. Web Publishing. Online Revenue. New Business Models for Journalism.\n\n
  • Identifying stories. Understanding a publication’s audience/tone. Pitching to editors. Developing sources. Multimedia reporting. Ethics of independent reporting. Production and editing. Social Media Campaigns. Fact Checking yourself. Web Publishing. Online Revenue. New Business Models for Journalism.\n\n
  • Identifying stories. Understanding a publication’s audience/tone. Pitching to editors. Developing sources. Multimedia reporting. Ethics of independent reporting. Production and editing. Social Media Campaigns. Fact Checking yourself. Web Publishing. Online Revenue. New Business Models for Journalism.\n\n
  • Identifying stories. Understanding a publication’s audience/tone. Pitching to editors. Developing sources. Multimedia reporting. Ethics of independent reporting. Production and editing. Social Media Campaigns. Fact Checking yourself. Web Publishing. Online Revenue. New Business Models for Journalism.\n\n
  • Identifying stories. Understanding a publication’s audience/tone. Pitching to editors. Developing sources. Multimedia reporting. Ethics of independent reporting. Production and editing. Social Media Campaigns. Fact Checking yourself. Web Publishing. Online Revenue. New Business Models for Journalism.\n\n
  • Identifying stories. Understanding a publication’s audience/tone. Pitching to editors. Developing sources. Multimedia reporting. Ethics of independent reporting. Production and editing. Social Media Campaigns. Fact Checking yourself. Web Publishing. Online Revenue. New Business Models for Journalism.\n\n
  • Identifying stories. Understanding a publication’s audience/tone. Pitching to editors. Developing sources. Multimedia reporting. Ethics of independent reporting. Production and editing. Social Media Campaigns. Fact Checking yourself. Web Publishing. Online Revenue. New Business Models for Journalism.\n\n
  • Identifying stories. Understanding a publication’s audience/tone. Pitching to editors. Developing sources. Multimedia reporting. Ethics of independent reporting. Production and editing. Social Media Campaigns. Fact Checking yourself. Web Publishing. Online Revenue. New Business Models for Journalism.\n\n
  • What is the difference between a Journalist, a citizen journalist and someone “committing and act of journalism?”\n\nHow do we define a “journalistic act?”\n\nDefinition of journalism (as in committing-an-act-of): Informative, independent, accountable and verified.\n\nThe first definition is from the dictionary, the second is a working definition of for journalism in the new media climate...\n\nWhat do each one of those points mean? How would you describe informative (etc.)?\n\nWe’ll be coming back to this point a lot, so be thinking about whether or not the media we’re looking at fits this definition (according to you)\n\n
  • What is the difference between a Journalist, a citizen journalist and someone “committing and act of journalism?”\n\nHow do we define a “journalistic act?”\n\nDefinition of journalism (as in committing-an-act-of): Informative, independent, accountable and verified.\n\nThe first definition is from the dictionary, the second is a working definition of for journalism in the new media climate...\n\nWhat do each one of those points mean? How would you describe informative (etc.)?\n\nWe’ll be coming back to this point a lot, so be thinking about whether or not the media we’re looking at fits this definition (according to you)\n\n
  • What is the difference between a Journalist, a citizen journalist and someone “committing and act of journalism?”\n\nHow do we define a “journalistic act?”\n\nDefinition of journalism (as in committing-an-act-of): Informative, independent, accountable and verified.\n\nThe first definition is from the dictionary, the second is a working definition of for journalism in the new media climate...\n\nWhat do each one of those points mean? How would you describe informative (etc.)?\n\nWe’ll be coming back to this point a lot, so be thinking about whether or not the media we’re looking at fits this definition (according to you)\n\n
  • \n
  • So you all came to a lecture titled “Entrepreneurial Journalism 101” why?\n\nWhat does it mean to you?\n\nWorld of Journalism changing (closing newspapers, new technology, shifting roles of journalists, etc.)\nLots of new kinds of careers and organizations out there (like ours). We want this presentation to be a kind of primer in the innovating industry you’ll inherit!\n\nHow many of you imagine your future careers in journalism described as “entrepreneurial”?\n*How many want careers in journalism?\n*How many imagine those careers happening in an existing media org?\n(I’ll make a prediction that most of you will either work as freelancers or in media companies orgs. that have yet to be created or are being created now)\n\nI didn’t necessarily know I wanted a career as entrepreneurial journalist either!\n\n\n\n
  • (If timing is right: jump to JOY)\n\nLet’s pull back a little and talk about what we mean by Entre J--The first time I was called an entrepreneurial journalist, I was like “Yeah, that’s awesome! What the heck does it mean?”\n\nFor most people at it’s most basic it means a journalist or media organization that takes on the business model of their venture themselves. No more firewall between journalists/reporters and the realities of how to fund their work.\n\nIt also means looking for new models outside of the old model of simply selling advertising space to fund reporting (non-profit, community supported, freelance).\n\nBut it’s not all economics of news it’s also about how the news stories get told. “Entrepreneurial Journalism” also means innovation--coming up with new ways to tell stories with new mediums (mostly on-line)\n\nAnd more and more it means that the people doing it CAN be outside the traditional news hierarchy (students, citizens, non-profits, etc.)\n
  • Economic Model: Talk a little more about the crisis (the rise of the internet, the end of advertising models, the simple fact that crappy journalism (or at least sports, local and entertainment) always makes more money than investigative, international, in-depth, controversial Think about it, somehow it feels like you always know more about say, Jessica Simpson’s new diet (green tea) than what’s going on in Afghanistan and there’s a reason for that. Leaving people looking for new ways to monetize journalism and information.\n\nNew Media Techniques It’s not just the delivery system that’s changed (newspaper, the radio and the T.V. vs. the Internet) it’s the way the stories are crafted. Attention spans are shorter, visuals are more important and information--even dull statistics can suddenly be represented in whole new ways\n\nNew Media Makers In some ways this is the most important part. It used to mean that the definition of a journalist was someone with a press pass, a pay check from a news organization and usually an expensive degree in journalism. Now more people are “committing acts of journalism” if you will. They may not be full-time journalists, but with access to the equipment and the tools of distribution (think about how much a video camera or a printing press used to cost compared to now) they have have a voice.\n\nLet’s linger on that point for a moment (how do we define journalism in a age when anyone can produce and publish media?)\n\n
  • Economic Model: Talk a little more about the crisis (the rise of the internet, the end of advertising models, the simple fact that crappy journalism (or at least sports, local and entertainment) always makes more money than investigative, international, in-depth, controversial Think about it, somehow it feels like you always know more about say, Jessica Simpson’s new diet (green tea) than what’s going on in Afghanistan and there’s a reason for that. Leaving people looking for new ways to monetize journalism and information.\n\nNew Media Techniques It’s not just the delivery system that’s changed (newspaper, the radio and the T.V. vs. the Internet) it’s the way the stories are crafted. Attention spans are shorter, visuals are more important and information--even dull statistics can suddenly be represented in whole new ways\n\nNew Media Makers In some ways this is the most important part. It used to mean that the definition of a journalist was someone with a press pass, a pay check from a news organization and usually an expensive degree in journalism. Now more people are “committing acts of journalism” if you will. They may not be full-time journalists, but with access to the equipment and the tools of distribution (think about how much a video camera or a printing press used to cost compared to now) they have have a voice.\n\nLet’s linger on that point for a moment (how do we define journalism in a age when anyone can produce and publish media?)\n\n
  • Economic Model: Talk a little more about the crisis (the rise of the internet, the end of advertising models, the simple fact that crappy journalism (or at least sports, local and entertainment) always makes more money than investigative, international, in-depth, controversial Think about it, somehow it feels like you always know more about say, Jessica Simpson’s new diet (green tea) than what’s going on in Afghanistan and there’s a reason for that. Leaving people looking for new ways to monetize journalism and information.\n\nNew Media Techniques It’s not just the delivery system that’s changed (newspaper, the radio and the T.V. vs. the Internet) it’s the way the stories are crafted. Attention spans are shorter, visuals are more important and information--even dull statistics can suddenly be represented in whole new ways\n\nNew Media Makers In some ways this is the most important part. It used to mean that the definition of a journalist was someone with a press pass, a pay check from a news organization and usually an expensive degree in journalism. Now more people are “committing acts of journalism” if you will. They may not be full-time journalists, but with access to the equipment and the tools of distribution (think about how much a video camera or a printing press used to cost compared to now) they have have a voice.\n\nLet’s linger on that point for a moment (how do we define journalism in a age when anyone can produce and publish media?)\n\n
  • Foundation grants - Gates family homelessness fellowship\nCrowd-sourced funding - cruise ships story\nSyndication - what does that mean?\n\nEthics pop quiz: what are the ethical considerations for a news organization taking grant support from someone with a stated opinion/interest in the problem they’re reporting on?\n\nIs that actually a new problem, or something that newspapers funded by advertising were always facing?\n
  • What does freelancing mean? Definition?\n\nNot really fair to call freelancing a new field (this pic, by an “unknown freelancer” is from somewhere between 1932-34) - but freelancing as a viable long term career option is a new idea. Most people saw it as a way to get a job in a newspaper, now it’s a job in and of itself.\n\nTalk through each one of these new freelancing opportunities\n\nMore and more freelancer are expected to work in multiple mediums, often fundraise for their own projects and brand their own work! \n\nAnd freelancers aren’t the only people who are taking the reins and producing and publishing on their own...transition into new participants - because we can all publish, we can all commit acts of journalism.\n\nAgain, “journalism” defined as: Informative, independent, accountable and verified.\n\n
  • What do you guys know about how Twitter affected the coverage of the Iranian protests last year and the role of citizen journalists during that time? \n\nWhat is a citizen journalist? What are they good and what aren’t they good at? Being “on the scene” vs. “giving context”\n\nRecapping “Acts of Journalism” Informative, independent, accountable and verified.\n\nParticularly important in regions that have tight restrictions on media (during this time Western media was pretty much banned in Iran/same example in Burma a few years ago)\n\nWhat are some other examples of how media tools have been put in the hands of the public (smart phones, youtube, Facebook)\n\n\nWhen you start looking for photos of the Iran election, Hamed Saber’s name is everywhere - he never took pictures until his daughter was born - and then the elections happened a short time later, and now his pix are everywhere.\n\nExample of how the Neda video become one of the most powerful pieces of media out Iran (taken by a bystander with a phone) Raw info vs. contextualized info\n\nSo sometime professional journalists just don’t have access to the action, here are some other examples...\n
  • *Firefighter has access a journo might not be able to get\n*CNN doesn’t sign off on everything posted to the iReport site; some images and videos they do review and fact check and give the official CNN stamp of approval\n\nSome in the industry say that this is just a way for a big corporation to get free material and labor (and fire trained journos), others say these media corpos are providing a crucial community service. What do you think?\n
  • Other examples: London bombings, tsunami\n
  • Seattle Times and Maurice Clemmons--very big step to embed a live twitter feed into their news page on one of the biggest stories of the year. Newspapers (understandably) concerned with verifying info, how do you do that when you’re asking the public for information? Result: Constant, thorough upates, community involvement, access and engagement. Won a Pulitzer (big deal in a dying newspaper world)\n\nCalifornia is a Place: New cameras mean that almost anyone, if they have the money, can point their camera at something and it looks good. Hollywood cameras used to cost $20k, now they cost 3k, by five years from now they’ll cost $500). Youthful style of storytelling (visual, short, edgy). Compare what the Seattle Time’s treatment of Scraper Bike movement might look like compared to this.\n\nAirport game: Compare a print story about the same topic (“such and such % of bombs get through”) next to this game. Which one teaches you more?\n
  • New Media: (online, mixed media, experimental)\nNew Economic Models: (freelance, foundation support, citizen support, university supported)\n\nNew Media Makers: Outside the established media (just young people with an idea)\n\n\n

Common Language Project for PNAJE Common Language Project for PNAJE Presentation Transcript

  • Entrepreneurial Journalism Alex Stonehill Sarah Stuteville www.clpmag.org
  • The Common LanguageProject:Our Story
  • What We Do:WATER WALKER
  • What We Do:Never Going Home:Iraqi Refugees Living in Limbo
  • Hybrid Funding Model:•Project Grants•Individual Donations•Freelance Revenue
  • 2009-PresentJournalism/University Partnership
  • Teaching & Skill Building• COM 363: Entrepreneurial Journalism Practicum• Hands-on Workshops• MCDM Program
  • Seattle Digital Literacy Initiative• Classroom visits• Summer Institute• Teacher Trainings
  • Professional Development•Internships•Career Week•Mentor Lunches•More!
  • Blogger
  • BloggerSocial Media Coordinator
  • BloggerSocial Media Coordinator Online Journalist
  • BloggerSocial Media Coordinator Multimedia Producer Online Journalist
  • BloggerSocial Media Coordinator Multimedia Producer SEO/Analytics Online Journalist Manager
  • BloggerSocial Media Coordinator Mobile Editor Multimedia Producer SEO/Analytics Online Journalist Manager
  • BloggerSocial Media Coordinator Copy Writer Mobile Editor Multimedia Producer SEO/Analytics Online Journalist Manager
  • Student Work
  • New Economic Models: Hyperlocal• Traffic & News at the micro level• Hyperlocal advertising• What are the new challenges represented in hyper local reporting?
  • COM 363: Entrepreneurial Journalism Practicum tinyurl.com/363Syllabus Learning goals:
  • COM 363: Entrepreneurial Journalism Practicum tinyurl.com/363Syllabus Learning goals:•Identifying stories
  • COM 363: Entrepreneurial Journalism Practicum tinyurl.com/363Syllabus Learning goals:•Identifying stories•Understanding publications’ audience and tone
  • COM 363: Entrepreneurial Journalism Practicum tinyurl.com/363Syllabus Learning goals:•Identifying stories•Understanding publications’ audience and tone•Pitching to editors
  • COM 363: Entrepreneurial Journalism Practicum tinyurl.com/363Syllabus Learning goals:•Identifying stories•Understanding publications’ audience and tone•Pitching to editors•Developing sources
  • COM 363: Entrepreneurial Journalism Practicum tinyurl.com/363Syllabus Learning goals:•Identifying stories•Understanding publications’ audience and tone•Pitching to editors•Developing sources•Multimedia reporting
  • COM 363: Entrepreneurial Journalism Practicum tinyurl.com/363Syllabus Learning goals:•Identifying stories•Understanding publications’ audience and tone•Pitching to editors•Developing sources•Multimedia reporting•Ethics of independent journalism
  • COM 363: Entrepreneurial Journalism Practicum tinyurl.com/363Syllabus Learning goals:•Identifying stories•Understanding publications’ audience and tone•Pitching to editors•Developing sources•Multimedia reporting•Ethics of independent journalism•Production and editing
  • COM 363: Entrepreneurial Journalism Practicum tinyurl.com/363Syllabus Learning goals:•Identifying stories•Understanding publications’ audience and tone•Pitching to editors•Developing sources•Multimedia reporting•Ethics of independent journalism•Production and editing•Social Media Campaigns
  • COM 363: Entrepreneurial Journalism Practicum tinyurl.com/363Syllabus Learning goals:•Identifying stories•Understanding publications’ audience and tone•Pitching to editors•Developing sources•Multimedia reporting•Ethics of independent journalism•Production and editing•Social Media Campaigns•Web Publishing
  • COM 363: Entrepreneurial Journalism Practicum tinyurl.com/363Syllabus Learning goals:•Identifying stories•Understanding publications’ audience and tone•Pitching to editors•Developing sources•Multimedia reporting•Ethics of independent journalism•Production and editing•Social Media Campaigns•Web Publishing•Online Revenue
  • COM 363: Entrepreneurial Journalism Practicum tinyurl.com/363Syllabus Learning goals:•Identifying stories•Understanding publications’ audience and tone•Pitching to editors•Developing sources•Multimedia reporting•Ethics of independent journalism•Production and editing•Social Media Campaigns•Web Publishing•Online Revenue•New Buisness Models for Journalism
  • Entrepreneurial Journalism
  • Entrepreneurial JournalismJournalism: The occupation ofreporting, writing, editing, photographing, orbroadcasting news or of conducting any newsorganization as a business.
  • Entrepreneurial JournalismJournalism: The occupation ofreporting, writing, editing, photographing, orbroadcasting news or of conducting any newsorganization as a business. OR:
  • Entrepreneurial JournalismJournalism: The occupation ofreporting, writing, editing, photographing, orbroadcasting news or of conducting any newsorganization as a business. OR:Journalism: Any form ofcommunication that is INFORMATIVE,INDEPENDENT, ACCOUNTABLE andVERIFIED
  • How can we better prepare our students for a new media landscape? Alex Stonehill: Sarah Stuteville:alex@clpmag.org sarah@clpmag.org www.clpmag.org
  • Entrepreneurial Journalism
  • new storytelling techniques+new economic models=entrepreneurial journalism Who tells the news“The only things worth doingare difficult and done with What gets coveredvery few resources.” Where it’s published Entrepreneur When we hear about it “a person who has possession of a new enterprise, venture or idea and assumes significant accountability for the inherent How it’s produced risks and the outcome.” Why it’s changing“A journalist collects and disseminates information aboutcurrent events, people, trends, and issues.”
  • What’s Changed?
  • What’s Changed?•New Economic Models
  • What’s Changed?•New Economic Models• New Media Makers
  • What’s Changed?•New Economic Models• New Media Makers• New Media Techniques
  • New Economic Models:Nonprofit• Foundation grants• “Crowd-sourced” funding• Syndication• How do you maintain editorial distance from your funders?• Is that actually a larger concern for nonprofits?
  • New Economic Models:Freelancing• Public radio/PRX• Promotional films• Huffington Post• Spot.us• CLP! Bonnie & Clyde, c. 1933 “Unknown Freelancer”
  • New Media Makers:#Iranelections• Twitter• Flickr• Hamed Saber
  • New Media Makers:iReport Forest fire video (there is a shot by a firefighter movie hereyou just can’t see it)Tweets sharing news and resources
  • New Media Makers:Disasters
  • New Media Techniques•Social Media and Breaking News•Classic Story, New Tools•Fun and Games
  • The Common Language Project www.clpmag.org • New media • New economic models • New Media Makers • YOU’RE A PART OF THIS ENTREPRENEURIAL MOMENT!!!!• Sarah Stuteville: sarah@clpmag.org• Jessica Partnow: jessica@clpmag.org