9  instructionalstudypaper
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
253
On Slideshare
228
From Embeds
25
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 25

http://alexboswell11.wordpress.com 25

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Boswell 1 Alex Boswell Professor Sawyer/Professor Hickey Secondary English Education Seminar 12/5/2012 Instructional Study Artifacts A­M are from a unit on characterization and essay writing for 7th  graders at Beacon Middle School. The construction of this unit serves as an example of my advocacy for students and democratic citizenship within the classroom by providing multiple modes of learning and an environment in which all students can participate. Students are encouraged to participate on a level in which they can actively construct knowledge, rather than solely reproduce knowledge; make an argument and substantiate it through the use of examples, details, facts, and reasons; and find meaning in class activities beyond earning grades. My baseline assessment for the students was a compare and contrast essay (See Artifacts H1 & I1). The baseline was conducted after the students read two stories and had practiced applying basic characterization methods to the two stories through homework and class activities, in order to compare the characters from each story by assessing their similarities and differences. I also reviewed the parts of an essay in class, using a Promethean board and student participation. The students started their essays in class and were asked to complete them as homework. This essay served as my baseline assessment, specifically, of the students' ability to write an essay and to analyze characterization. My final assessment was an essay re­write after a week and a half of further instruction (See H5 & I5). I found that the most noticeable and consistent weakness within the baseline assessment essays was a lack of evidence for supporting details. For instance, in “Sample H1,” the student, in his first essay, wrote “they both enjoyed the attention given to them for their lies and rudeness” to support the idea that the two characters he was comparing were similar; however, he did not provide any examples. The student seemed to understand that he needed three supporting details to back up his topic sentence, but he did not understand that he needed to follow through with his supporting details by providing evidence. In the student’s final essay, “Sample H5,” he edited and developed his idea by writing: “The final reason they are similar is they both wanted attention for their lies. An example of Great Grandma wanting attention was when she lied to the news crew and reporters about being in the Hindenburg and several other events. She did this so the reporters would put her in the newspaper. An example of Laurie wanting attention was when he spilled his baby sister’s milk, he did this so his parents would listen to him.” The final essays, compared to the baseline assessment, were not perfect, but they marked ample improvement in students’ ability to use evidence to support their ideas. This also enhanced their ability to more fully demonstrate their aptitude to assess characterization in the story by writing more specifically
  • 2. Boswell 2 about the characters, instead of in generalizations. In order to develop and scaffold students’ ability to support their claims with specific details and examples, I facilitated several activities that guided students through going back into the text to support their ideas and connections to their reading. A general overview of the lessons I created between the baseline assessment and the final assessment are provided in “Artifact J,” and three sample lesson plans are provided in Artifacts K­M. First, I introduced an annotation method that I had tried out for the first time with a class of 11th graders at my previous student teaching placement. The annotation method encouraged students to re­read specific passages in a story and to draw a symbol when they thought something in the story was surprising, important, confusing, or funny. They could also draw a symbol when they disagreed with an aspect of the story or when they could make a connection to a part of the story in a personal way or through something they had learned in the past. In addition, they were asked to underline each line of the passage with different colors in order to indicate when and where a particular character was speaking (See “Artifact A”). I modeled the activity for the students on a Promethean board and modeled my thought process for the activity by thinking out loud. I then allowed the students to use the annotation method in groups. The annotation method was meant to help students make connections to specific passages in a story and to encourage them to practice re­reading. The underlining with different colors helped students to visually break down the presence of each character in the passage and to assess what a character actually said, in comparison to what other characters said about or in reaction to that character. After the students annotated a specific passage that was assigned to them in their group, each student was assigned a specific character to analyze in their particular passage (See B & C). This was meant to help students focus on linking their analysis of characters to specific evidence provided in the text. Then, the next day, all of the students gathered together and turned their passages of different parts of the story into skits that they performed. Each student played the character that they were assigned to analyze. They used their character analysis to play their specific character in their passage of the story. The groups also used their annotations to more carefully plan how they were going to interpret and act out their passage. This was one way of giving the annotation and character analysis more of a purpose for the students than just monotonous note taking on worksheets. It also helped students to demonstrate their ability to pay close attention to specific points of evidence in the text through experiencing and acting out their knowledge, instead of just writing it. Secondly, after performance day, students read a new story and practiced finding examples from the text to back up a few key ideas. Then they re­read a passage of the story and made annotations on it; however, this time they annotated the passages silently, as well as individually, and they had to write an explanation for each annotation symbol (See D­G). I, also, once again, modeled the annotation for them before they did the activity on their own; however, this time I asked the class to act as if they were one collective brain that was annotating a passage from the story on the Promethean board. We came up with annotations for the model passage in a unique and organic manner by allowing everyone to participate. Students stated what annotation symbol they would use, where they would put it, and why. Then they were able to come up to the board and draw their annotation symbol on the passage. Next, the students started their own individual annotations of a different passage in class and finished it for homework. After practicing the skills to reread, make connections to specific passages in a text, and provide evidence through using quotes to back up one’s claims about a story, the students were given
  • 3. Boswell 3 back their graded essays that had acted as my baseline assessment. First, the class was asked to discuss the importance of knowing how to win an argument and knowing one’s audience, as a “Do Now” activity, and then they applied this discussion when looking over the rubric that was used to grade their essays (See H2 & I2). Then students were given an essay graphic organizer that broke down each part of an essay and included an extra step to provide evidence for each supporting detail (See H3 & I3). We reviewed the parts of an essay. I modeled for them what a supporting detail with evidence looks like and then we came up with a few examples collectively as a class. Next, the students were finally asked to start a second draft of their essays on the essay graphic organizer. They could work in pairs for about ten minutes in order to ask each other for help or brainstorm with a friend, and then they had to finish their second draft for homework, with the knowledge that they would be trading papers with a classmate for a peer edit the following day (See H4 & I4). The eleven days that it took to work up to an effective re­write was not initially planned and there were a few changes I made in my instruction along the way. First, when I started looking at the essays and noticed a similar weakness in all of them, I set aside my previous plans and decided to focus on building the skills to make direct connections to quotes, to more effectively reference texts, and to back up one’s ideas with sufficient evidence. The students still did not write perfect essays but the improvement in all of the essays is visible. Secondly, one piece of advice that I took from my supervisor was to allow the students to participate in the modeling of the annotation process, rather than being passive spectators. I did this when I modeled the annotation method for a second time and I noticed that the students were more astute and lively. They were motivated to participate with the knowledge that their ideas could be taken into account and that they would be able to write on the Promethean board. Thirdly, I had not planned on discussing the importance of knowing one’s audience when essay writing until the students started to answer the question, “How do you win an argument?”, as their “Do Now” activity. I assumed that the question would smoothly lead into how important it is to back up one’s ideas with evidence to win an argument and that this would then lead the class into comparing the structure of an essay to the real world by thinking about how they could use that structure to win an argument. To my surprise, only a few people said that they would use evidence and facts to win an argument. Most of the 7th  graders in my classroom believed that they could win an argument by confusing the other person, making them feel bad, or overpowering them by talking loudly or being physically intimidating. I responded to these assumptions by asking the students to think about how they were using psychology to win an argument and to focus on how they assess a specific audience to know how to belittle, confuse, or overpower their specific audience in order to win. I added comedy to the conversation by asking the students to imagine trying to win an argument with me by attempting to confuse, belittle, or intimidate me. They would probably need to reassess their strategy with me as their audience and come up with a more effective tactic. This was an unexpected turn in the lesson but it worked out well because I was able to then use the rubric as a way for the students to assess their audience when essay writing. If I were to adjust my instruction for the future, I would extend the duration of the unit and include more structured writing throughout. Students could practice substantiating their ideas in both creative and formal ways through various given structures. This would more effectively establish their skills to be able to demonstrate the expected intellectual quality of their essays and, in addition, prepare them for becoming more college and career ready in the future.
  • 4. Boswell 4