Using NVivo QSR Theory and Practice for Qualitative Data Analysis in a PhD
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Using NVivo QSR Theory and Practice for Qualitative Data Analysis in a PhD

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Session from Salford Business School http://www.salford.ac.uk/business-school doctoral school at the Digital Business Centre. This explain the rationale and some of the basic concepts when it comes......

Session from Salford Business School http://www.salford.ac.uk/business-school doctoral school at the Digital Business Centre. This explain the rationale and some of the basic concepts when it comes to using NVivo QSR for data analysis.

NVivo is a tool for helping to you analyse qualitative data but it does not replace the thinking process - there is a need for you to consider the bigger picture of how NVivo will fit into your research project and this presentation offers some themes you should explore before you commit to the use of NVivo.

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  • 1. Using NVivo QSR - Theory andPractice for Qualitative Data AnalysisDr Aleksej HeinzeCentre for Digital BusinessDoctoral Training Programmewww.salford.ac.uk/business-school
  • 2. What specific areas are of interest toYOU?
  • 3. Session outline What NVivo is not.. Why use NVivo or similar tools? Getting your computer ready Preparation of documents The basic process of analysis:– Coding– Developing node trees– Node diagrams
  • 4. What NVivo is not… Solve your data analysis problems Write your thesis Make your argument Useful for a short interview analysis Learn to use very quickly
  • 5. Here is what they saySee - http://goo.gl/kWcdQ
  • 6. Why use NVivo or similar tools?
  • 7. Why use NVivo or similar tools? Organisation of your data Speed of qualitative data analysis Scalability of your research Traceability of your analysis – important for theViva … Use of a ‘standard method’ making groupprojects easier Keeping files electronically available –portability Provides a structure/framework
  • 8. How can we learn to use it? We all have our own styles to choose from, but… Training sessions see their website:www.qsrinternational.com Very helpful help file! YouTube• www.youtube.com/user/QSRInternational Read articles around the area – see references Just get started – learning by doing
  • 9. Some NVivo terminology - Node Node: a conceptual representation ofcodes that the researcher foundsignificant during the analysis processusing QSR NVivo software. Nodes are represented in diagrams andgraphically illustrated with a ball.
  • 10. Some NVivo terminology – Node tree Node tree: logical composition of nodes into a treehierarchy. Tree node diagrams are organised so thatthe root of the tree is at the top.
  • 11. Some NVivo terminology – Sources Source: documents that have been importedinto NVivo for analysis and your own ideas
  • 12. Some NVivo terminology – Sources Source: documents that have been importedinto invivo for analysis
  • 13. Getting the ‘right’ software There are a number of NVivo versions –7, 8 , 9, 10 … Windows Operating System Telephone ILS and ask to be added tothe NVivo user group
  • 14. Preparing your dataVery basic level of document analysisUse MS Word for document preparationUse styles for headings and for paragraphsBreak down paragraphs into smaller sections
  • 15. Example: Q1 Question 1: Thank you very much for making it today. The reason for thisinterview is to follow up the focus group that we had and thensee from the individual students what they think about thecourse. We hope to use these findings in order to improve thecourse. We are going away in June for a staff away day and wewill focus there on the issues arising and hopefully we canimprove this course. We would really like your input so that wecan see what can be done better. First of all I just wondered if you could tell me what was yourimpression of the course overall? A1 AMH:Heading 1Heading 1Heading 2
  • 16. Activity: format this text:AMH: Well it is quite different to me, because it is the first year, eventhough it is the second year running of the course. So, being a new person in,it is really about getting to know everyone, in the first few months, getting intothe system you know the routine using the Blackboard. Because I enrolledsort of on the last day, I was just thrown in really, but I found it OK. Goodlearning curve you know. Lectures I thought were very good, so quite positivefor me really.The only one thing that I could criticise was the computing networkingassignment, where we were all in one room, and unfortunately it was anenormous class to start with, and unless you got the tutor’s attention initially –you were really, you were at a loss in some respects. Now, for me and mypartner in particular, it was a little bit hard to catch on, I found that a little bitdifficult. But that was because of sheer numbers in the class to be honest. ButI think that quite a few have actually left the course, I have seen the numbersgo down quite a bit.One of the bigger headaches was the one that I brought up at the othermeeting, the parking. Absolutely horrendous, if you are travelling a longdistance as well and you can’t park – I have actually been refused entrance ontwo separate occasions. I was told that I could not park across the way unlessI got a permit, although I had no idea that I would have difficulties parking. Iknow that it is difficult for everybody to be in the car park, but if you haveenrolled on the course as a part time student it is extra difficult without adoubt.
  • 17. Inductive vs Deductive ?Inductive approach: look at your data and seewhat it is saying – e.g. Grounded Theory –• Nodes emergeDeductive approach: hypotheses which can betested in order to support the general ideas. –• Nodes are predetermined
  • 18. What is Your PhD Flow – Themes? Research Problem and why it is important foracademic study Research question Literature – what did others say about it? Data sources and types of collection Contributions to knowledge/ practice
  • 19. Analysis processImage source: NVivo help file
  • 20. Import all files
  • 21. Coding process
  • 22. Organise your nodes into trees
  • 23. ActivityGo to this website:www.searchmarketing.salford.ac.uk• Download the content of the pages and save itin MS Word• Prepare the documents for Nvivo formatting• Import the document and code it answering thequestion: What is Search and Social MediaMarketing?
  • 24. Build node models
  • 25. ActivityDevelop a diagram to represent your findings
  • 26. Summary Why use NVivo or similar tools? Getting your computer ready Preparation of documents The process of analysis
  • 27. References Gregorio, S. d. (2000). Using NVivo for your literaturereview. Paper presented at the Strategies in qualitativeresearch: issues and results from analysis using QSRNVivo and Nud*Ist. London Heinze, A. (2008). 4.5 Data analysis. Blended learning: aninterpretive action research study. PhD thesis, University ofSalford, Salford. Pages 96 - 107, Available from:http://usir.salford.ac.uk/1653/ Miles, M., & Huberman, M. (1994). Qualitative DataAnalysis: An Expanded Sourcebook. London: SagePublications.
  • 28. @AleksejHeinzealeksejheinze
  • 29. Using NVivo QSR - Theory andPractice for Qualitative Data AnalysisDr Aleksej HeinzeCentre for Digital BusinessDoctoral Training Programmewww.salford.ac.uk/business-school